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Let's make this the book review thread:

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posted on Jun, 15 2008 @ 09:29 PM
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As you may know (or not), I am very much in favour of such an idea.


But I still think there should be a board called "Book reviews", with individual threads about each book reviewed - like a "book shelf", you know?

And so, anyone interested in discussing or reading about a particular book could easily find the appropriate thread.
Also, it would prevent a single thread growing out of all proportion.





[edit on 15-6-2008 by Vanitas]




posted on Jun, 15 2008 @ 10:37 PM
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reply to post by Vanitas
 


I am just happy we finally got this board. I don't really want to wait around and hope for another board to get started up. I hope that this thread continues to work. So far there have already been some good reccomendations taht I look forward to checking out.



posted on Jun, 15 2008 @ 11:44 PM
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reply to post by Karlhungis
 



But, Karl, creating a sub-board would - certainly should - be a piece of cake for the moderators.

And transfering - or just plain copying and pasting - all the interesting messages onto would be another piece of cake...

(Certainly now that it's still in its early stages!)

I hope I don't come across as argumentative, because it's the farthest thing from my mind. (And I am only asking because I know how many other people on these boards are quickly ticked off...
)

Of course it's a great idea.
All I am saying is that having a "book shelf" from which to pick and choose and browse without going through all the posts would be even better...



posted on Jun, 15 2008 @ 11:51 PM
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reply to post by Vanitas
 


Oh, I don't think you are being argumentative at all. I just know that it took 100 flags and the support of a mod in order for this one to be created, so I don't have high hopes for another one too soon.

It is a great idea though.



posted on Jun, 16 2008 @ 12:18 AM
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reply to post by Karlhungis
 

The book is a guide for parents and educators geared at children from kindergarten to 8th grade. It's meant to help develop a child's critical thinking skills.

I have personally been having what can be construed as philosophical conversations with my son since he was about four years old. Some of his early questions concerned where he was before he was a baby. At the time these questions were triggered by the expectancy of my second child.


I think that children are natural philosphers at heart. If you've ever had the pleasure of being around a child during their formative years then you have no doubt been hit with a barrage of curious questions. If God is real, then why can't you see him? Why does time move so slow when I'm bored, and so fast when I'm having fun? If Grandpa's in Heaven, how come we can't visit him?

Perhaps a better way to look at it is this: Philosophical questions are already being asked. It's a matter of responding to these questions in a way that is both honest, and indepth.



posted on Jun, 16 2008 @ 12:46 AM
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Journeys Out of the Body: By Robert Monroe
www.amazon.com...


Robert Monroe is the founder of the Monroe institute. He was a naturally gifted Astral Projector. His foundation created systems of helping people project on their own. They still have retreats and conferences about Astral Projection. They created gateway program which is a hemi-sync guided program to help assist you with projecting.

Journeys Out of the Body is his first book which discusses his experiences and how he learned about what it is he was doing. It starts out when he was a respected business man that was confused about what was happening to him. It goes on to cover his confusion and borderline shame about the situation. He seemed to be very reluctant to discuss what he was doing with many people out of fear of being misunderstood, labeled....etc.

At the time I read the book, I was much more interested in learning techniques than reading about peoples personal discovery and how Astral Projection was affecting their real life. So, I didn't personally enjoy the book all that much. But if you are already projecting and not sure if you want to tell people about it, then this would be a good book for you.



posted on Jun, 16 2008 @ 12:55 AM
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Originally posted by Zenskeptical
How is "Zen and the art of motorcycle maintenance"? I've only heard good things but wonder if it worth the time to read...


it's good...being a fictional narrative of a motorcycle road trip across the continental united states and switching back and forth from that narrative to the narrator's philosophical thoughts. it can get frustrating with the constant switch of narration and philosophy. it all correlates and is awesome, though.

one of my favorite quotes from the book...

"Mountains should be climbed with as little effort as possible and without desire. The reality of your own nature should determine the speed. If you become restless, speed up. If you become winded, slow down. You climb the mountain in an equilibrium between restlessness and exhaustion. Then, when you're no longer thinking ahead, each footstep isn't just a means to an end but a unique event in itself. This leaf has jagged edges. This rocks looks loose. From this place the snow is less visible, even though closer. These are things you should notice anyway. To live only for some future goal is shallow. It's the sides of the mountain which sustain life, not the top. Here's where things grow. But of course, without the top, you can't have any sides. It's the top that defines the sides."



posted on Jun, 16 2008 @ 04:43 AM
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The portable Jung
A nice compilation of the works and life of Carl G. Jung, haven't finished it yet but it's a nice read and most of the subjects he touched are in there and it tells about the life of Jung.

Critical mass
A very nice book about mass psychology and explains how people think in groups. It is not only mass psychology but also scientific theories about the concept criticall mass. Nice if you are curious about how the world could be ( and is being? ) influenced on a grand scale.

Life after death Chopra tries (and imo succeeds) in making a case about the reality of life after death, reincarnation and other concepts of that nature. If you have a fear of death this is a good read to shake it
.

Conversations with God Personally one of my favorites in regards of the message it sends out. See the link to check what it says, he claims that he has a direct link with the entity that some may call god (just like anybody else but he figured out how to listen
). If you do not like new agey luvy duvy stuff this may want to make you hurl at some points but still; even if that writer just talks out of his behind the message he gives about how to live your live is a good one, so nothing lost i'd say.



posted on Jun, 16 2008 @ 04:54 AM
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reply to post by melatonin
 


yes you may suggest some stuff from the scientific angle as it serves to balance out our wildly esoteric tastes



posted on Jun, 16 2008 @ 05:04 AM
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posted on Jun, 16 2008 @ 05:07 AM
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Originally posted by Vanitas

As you may know (or not), I am very much in favour of such an idea.


But I still think there should be a board called "Book reviews", with individual threads about each book reviewed - like a "book shelf", you know?

And so, anyone interested in discussing or reading about a particular book could easily find the appropriate thread.
Also, it would prevent a single thread growing out of all proportion.




There already is....sort of



posted on Jun, 16 2008 @ 04:36 PM
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Originally posted by Skyfloating
yes you may suggest some stuff from the scientific angle as it serves to balance out our wildly esoteric tastes


Cool. I may well make some psychology threads in time, but I'm going to be damn busy for the next few weeks (they'll take a bit of research to make them robust and interesting) and it'll allow me to wait to see how the subforum pans out.

Esoteric's fine, but I suppose it would be good to 'balance' it out. Just not sure anyone will be that interested in the moves I have. Also, I'm still smarting from when you said - '"soft science" of psychology', rather than '"soft" science of psychology' or just 'science of psychology' in your opening thread*.

:shimmy:

*
lol

[edit on 16-6-2008 by melatonin]



posted on Jun, 16 2008 @ 05:23 PM
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reply to post by Karlhungis
 


Astral Dynamics is the only book I've read on AP. Can you tell us the difference in a purist perspective and Robert Bruce?



posted on Jun, 17 2008 @ 12:17 AM
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reply to post by Novise
 


Not being a purist myself, I can't say. I only mentioned it because I heard people be critical of him on forums that I used to go to. Most people like him, but there were a few detractors, so that is why I put that in there.



posted on Jun, 17 2008 @ 03:34 AM
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Originally posted by melatonin
Cool. I may well make some psychology threads in time, but I'm going to be damn busy for the next few weeks (they'll take a bit of research to make them robust and interesting) and it'll allow me to wait to see how the subforum pans out.



Your additions are welcome, even if they go against the general speculative tone of the Forum. Dont take what is already in the Forum as an example of "how and what to post", set your own standard.

Having read many of your posts in other Forums I have an idea of what to expect


[edit on 17-6-2008 by Skyfloating]



posted on Jun, 17 2008 @ 10:15 AM
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Originally posted by Skyfloating
Having read many of your posts in other Forums I have an idea of what to expect


Ahhh! But nobody expects the Spanish inquisition!

I haz the comfy chair!

Anyway, some other good recommended books which certainly speak to mind and behaviour. Also fairly neurobiological in nature but written for a general audience by well-respected neurologists:

Oliver Sacks - 'The Man who mistook his wife for a hat'


Synopsis
"The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat" is populated by a cast as strange as that of the most fantastic fiction. The subject of this strange and wonderful book is what happens when things go wrong with parts of the brain most of us don't know exist ...Dr Sacks shows the awesome powers of our mind and just how delicately balanced they have to be' - "Sunday Times". 'Who is this book for? Who is it not for? It is for everybody who has felt from time to time that certain twinge of self-identity and sensed how easily, at any moment, one might lose it' - "The Times". 'This is, in the best sense, a serious book. It is, indeed, a wonderful book, by which I mean not only that it is excellent (which it is) but also that it is full of wonder, wonders and wondering. He brings to these often unhappy people understanding, sympathy and respect. Sacks is always learning from his patients, marvelling at them, widening his own understanding and ours' - "Punch".


and also:

V.S. Ramachandran - 'Phantoms in the mind: human nature and architecture of the mind'


Amazon.co.uk Review
What would you say about a woman who, despite stroke-induced paralysis crippling the entire left side of her body, insists that she is whole and strong--who even sees her left hand reach out to grasp objects? Freud called it "denial"; neurologists call it "anosognosia". However it may be labelled, this phenomenon and others like it allow us peeks into other mental worlds and afford us considerable insight into our own.
The writings of Oliver Sacks and others have shown us that we can learn much about ourselves by looking closely at the deficits shown by people with neurological problems. VS Ramachandran has seen countless patients suffering from anosognosia, phantom limb pain, blindsight and other disorders, and he brings a remarkable mixture of clinical intuition and research savvy to bear on their problems. He is one of the few scientists who are able and willing to explore the personal, subjective ramifications of his work; he rehumanizes an often too-sterile field and captures the spirit of wonder so essential for true discovery. Phantoms in the Brain is equal parts medical mystery, scientific adventure, and philosophical speculation; Ramachandran's writing is smart, caring, and very, very funny.

Whether you're curious about the workings of the brain, interested in alternatives to expensive, high-tech science (much of Ramachandran's research is done with materials found around the home), or simply want a fresh perspective on the nature of human consciousness, you'll find satisfaction with Phantoms in the Brain. --Rob Lightner

Dr Francis Crick, Nobel Laureate
'If you are at all interested in how your brain works, this is the book you must read.'


Both blurbs from Amazon.co.uk. I'd give my own review, however most of these books are long read but I can't help but recommend them (and those Damasio books) as real standout pieces of work. All contain elegant descriptions of interesting and influential scientific findings in an easily accessible manner.

The Gladwell book is more pop psych, but still a worthwhile read.

[edit on 17-6-2008 by melatonin]



posted on Jun, 18 2008 @ 05:12 AM
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Olaf Stapledon / Star Maker


This is a rather old science-fiction-classic but would be better suited in the "philosophy" book section as it offers a comprehensive and enlightening cosmology-of-everything.

Insider Recommendation.



posted on Jun, 19 2008 @ 02:20 PM
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There already is....sort of


Indeed there is; and it's a very good one.


May I suggest here that it be moved to ATS?
I think many more people would make use of it.

Meanwhile, I am going to post my suggestions (if any) here AND there.
Not exactly reposting, but close.
(I hope nobody minds?)




[edit on 19-6-2008 by Vanitas]



posted on Jun, 19 2008 @ 02:22 PM
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I recommend the "Philadelphia Experiment Murder" which talks about NAZIs, greys, interdimensional flux and the Montauk Experiments.

[edit on 19-6-2008 by 420prajna]



posted on Jun, 19 2008 @ 02:28 PM
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Parallel Universes of Self



It IS extraordinary, both in insight and in practicality (which is a rare virtue).
I wish many more people would know about it.
Cynthia Larson has listed it in her May issue of "Realityshifters".
Considering the size and geographical scope of her readership, it is reasonable to expect that many more people will get to know it.



The Holographic Universe


One of my most often read books - and that's despite its many, many flaws.
I'd love to write a recension (if I had the time), but since it's rather well known, perhaps we could just discuss its merits and flaws?









[edit on 19-6-2008 by Vanitas]





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