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Astronomers Detect Shadow Of Water World In Front Of Nearby Star

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posted on Jun, 9 2008 @ 06:07 AM
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Astronomers Detect Shadow Of Water World In Front Of Nearby Star


www.sciencedaily.com

A team of European astronomers led by Michaël Gillon, a researcher from Liege University, has measured the transit of a Neptune-sized planet around another star. For the first time, the size and density of such a small extra-solar planet has been measured, showing that this planet is made up mainly of water.

The star GJ 436, a diminutive star (red dwarf) 30 light-years from the Sun, was known since 2004 to harbour a 22-Earth mass planet, orbiting 4 million kilometers from the star (0.03 Astronomical Units).
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Jun, 9 2008 @ 06:07 AM
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A new Atlantis? A new underwater world that is swimming with with life? This is more interesting than Mars.

www.sciencedaily.com
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Jun, 9 2008 @ 06:43 AM
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if there is life in this planet then it won't quite be the same as the ones that we're familiar with. Here's a quote from the source article:


As the planet is close to its host star, its surface temperature is expected to be at least 300 C (600 F). The water in its atmosphere would therefore be in the form of steam. Inside, the water is crushed under intense pressure and adopts states unknown on Earth, except in physicist’s laboratories. Says Frédéric Pont: "water has more than a dozen solid states, only one of which is our familiar ice. Under very high pressure, water turns into other solid states denser than both ice and liquid water, just as carbon transforms into diamond under extreme pressures.



The boiling point of water is 100 °C (212 °F) at standard pressure. On top of Mount Everest the pressure is about 260 mbar (26.39 kPa) so the boiling point of water is 69 °C. (156.2 °F).


Wiki

So what we might be looking at here is water in the atmosphere in the form of steam and solidified water (exotic ice?) on the surface.



posted on Jun, 9 2008 @ 06:43 AM
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It's only 4 million kilometers from it's star? The water temperature would be several hundred degrees, wouldn't it?



posted on Jun, 9 2008 @ 07:03 AM
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Wow - that's pretty cool, a steam atmosphere at 300 deg C, then it must have liquid water going far deeper than any ocean on Earth, then eventually the water will change into these exotic 'hot ice's' under the extreme pressure.

I'm no expert but that wide spectrum of states of water must have huge potential for life.

Edit:

Originally posted by toreishi
if there is life in this planet then it won't quite be the same as the ones that we're familiar with.


Show me a planet (besides Earth) with life that I would be familiar with and I'll be you bestest friend!

[edit on 9/6/2008 by Now_Then]



posted on Jun, 9 2008 @ 09:45 AM
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I would suspect there would be possible life on a water world.

But we need to think outside of the box and realize that life on Earth has adapted for this environment. Raise the temperature of earth a few hundred degrees and eventually there will be other life forms we perhaps have not seen or heard of at all.

Who's to say life cannot exist at 1000 degrees on another planets? Science? nah - i think not!



posted on Jun, 9 2008 @ 09:55 AM
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Before we start saying it's too close to it's star, remember, we know barely anything about how the sun works, not to mention the ice caps found on mercury few years back. Hope to hear more from this.



posted on Jun, 9 2008 @ 10:43 AM
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Originally posted by shearder
I would suspect there would be possible life on a water world.

But we need to think outside of the box and realize that life on Earth has adapted for this environment. Raise the temperature of earth a few hundred degrees and eventually there will be other life forms we perhaps have not seen or heard of at all.

Who's to say life cannot exist at 1000 degrees on another planets? Science? nah - i think not!


Like those critters who live in the deep sea vents. The ocean floor has some intensely strange things, I don't doubt at all that there's life on this water planet.



posted on Jun, 9 2008 @ 11:04 AM
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Originally posted by Now_Then

Show me a planet (besides Earth) with life that I would be familiar with and I'll be you bestest friend!

[edit on 9/6/2008 by Now_Then]


With a surface temp +/- 300 degrees I think the chicken/egg debate would be moot on this planet as eggs as well as water usually boil at 100 degrees centigrade and the chicken would be just about half-cooked at that point. methinks if there is liquid water to be found on this planet then it will be between the steamy outer atmosphere and the diamond-hard "surface" (if that makes any sense
).

@ Now_Then

Can't show you a planet with life as I haven't seen one just yet, but if you'll be patient just a little longer
... I think that we'll be able to assess whether an extrasolar planet has life or not in the next half century or so.



posted on Jun, 10 2008 @ 09:17 AM
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It would seem from this threads reply posts that quite a few people have the same belief as most scientists that for life to exist it requires certain things to be present.
Water and a "comfortable" temperature are the pre-requisites for life on earth, buts as we are discussing non-earth lifeforms then what makes people believe that they would require the same things as we do to live.

In other words what is to say that an alien lifeform couldn't survie without water? why wouldn't they be say liquid methane "drinkers" and hydrogen "breathers"?
Where is the difinitive proof that alien life would need anything like what humans need to surivive.
Maybe aliens would die in our atmosphere due to it being too cold, or too hot, perhaps their atmosophere is one composed of nitrogen or their planets ambient temperature is minus 200 degrees celesius.

Basically my point is who can say for sure that our idea of life requirements are correct when applied to other lifeforms and other planets.
We won't know till we go, and thanks to the backwards tech nasa insists on using (at least in the public eye) we won't be going for a very long time.

[edit on 10-6-2008 by smokey101]



posted on Jun, 10 2008 @ 09:44 AM
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Originally posted by smokey101
It would seem from this threads reply posts that quite a few people have the same belief as most scientists that for life to exist it requires certain things to be present.
Water and a "comfortable" temperature are the pre-requisites for life on earth, buts as we are discussing non-earth lifeforms then what makes people believe that they would require the same things as we do to live.


psssst... nope! You are making assumptions. No one said water HAD to be present. The mention of life living in water was based, IMO, on the OPs posting on a "Water World" - as it mentions in the title. Not sand world or glass world or gas world. Regardless if it is frozen - solid as a diamond or filled with steam - it is said to be a "water" world. This would typically, and i say typically, fluid water or it would be mentioned as a Gas world or an Ice world. Again just MO.


In other words what is to say that an alien lifeform couldn't survie without water? why wouldn't they be say liquid methane "drinkers" and hydrogen "breathers"?

OR sulphur based life exists. I don't think anyone knows enough and for anyone to assume life can exist only with water is just basing that idea on earth science


I may be wrong but perhaps you made hasty assumptions on what is or is not being said?



posted on Jun, 10 2008 @ 09:47 AM
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reply to post by shearder
 


Agreed, wasn't this settled when we discovered all the extremophiles.



posted on Jun, 10 2008 @ 09:56 AM
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Sorry guys,
I was a little hasty in my post, but it really reminded me of this documentary i saw on the national geographic channel about possible e.t. life and all the scientist on there went on about was neededing to find water.

I was hasty, i was wrong and i do appologise.
I am one of those who belives in life on other worlds and hates narrow mindedness, but through that i became slighty narrow minded and missed the op's point so i am sorry.
Smokey.



posted on Jun, 10 2008 @ 11:56 PM
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reply to post by smokey101
 


Hey smokey101, no harm done mate! We all do this from time to time and because it is, or can be, a sensitive subject between believers and non believers it can get a touch out of hand and off topic.

I take my hat off to you for the way in which you responded. That is the making of a GREAT ATS member and would class you in my books as someone selectable as a "friend" because you could have come back with a very different approach to your post!!



posted on Jun, 11 2008 @ 01:18 AM
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reply to post by shearder
 


Thank you Shearder,
It was reading great posts by people like you that helped me make the decision to join ATS after a being a "lurker" for a year or so.

And to go back to the topic a little bit, I think it is a great thing that with current technology that we can find planets orbiting stars light years away and even make an educated guess at their composition.
I realy do hope that there is life on that planet, i can only imagine the form it would take and the type of interstellar ships and technology they would of developed.

I wonder if we can find planets orbiting other stars then has a civilisation on a distant world who are at the same technological level as us, found our planet orbiting our star the same way we have with this one.



posted on Jun, 11 2008 @ 03:11 AM
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Originally posted by smokey101
Thank you Shearder,
It was reading great posts by people like you that helped me make the decision to join ATS after a being a "lurker" for a year or so.


I am honoured by your statement and i am pleased you did join. It is always good to hear a new "voice" that adds quality! I hope you have a great time here.


I wonder if we can find planets orbiting other stars then has a civilisation on a distant world who are at the same technological level as us, found our planet orbiting our star the same way we have with this one.


Well the possibility is always there!! Something i posted some time back and it makes one think:

Read it here...


The earth is a mere spec in the universe at 4billion miles and think that further away does not even feature. Based on info from the HST (hubble) and its new camera - it is estimated there are 125 billion galaxies in OUR universe (if there is a multiverse - imagine the enormity)

Now our galaxy, the Milky Way, contains 100,000,000,000 stars multiply that by (ok not exactly so we could get technical so i will humour those technical junkies in a second) 3000 galaxies that we CAN see would contain 300,000,000,000,000 stars. Ok for the junkies, lets divide that by 1000 and we get 300,000,000,000 stars. Now put that all together and hold it up and find earth amongst all of that. Now consider this, theoretically there are 10 trillion planetary systems in the universe. Now even if there were only 1 million planetary systems we are one and we are a mere spec. Hell, if we have a picture of the milky way we don't even feature and we wouldn't be seen just by looking at it. We would be able to point out an approximate position but pointing to a spec that is earth would be virtually, if not totally, impossible.

So to conclude:

there are at least 100 billion stars with planets in our Galaxy alone
and we have people who still don't believe that possibly on ONE other planet there is life like ours - and perhaps an even more diverse life forms


Makes one think. Sorry Andro_59227 - this is not meant to go off topic but i am sure it does add to the possibility of life on that planet


Please feel free to U2U me Andro_59227 if you would prefer i remove that info - not a problem at all.



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