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Can *anyone* learn to draw well or not?

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posted on Jun, 9 2008 @ 02:16 AM
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So recently I was watching a video online in which an artist drew something live and then showed viewers how to ink/crosshatch it realistically. Things like this have been pretty prevalent on sites like youtube lately.

It got me to thinking. Most of us on this forum live in a very individualistic society. In the 'west' now we are usually told that we can do anything if we try, we are all roughly equal, yada yada. Yet things like drawing seem to break this rule... Or do they?

That was certainly the case traditionally, but is this something like... I don't know, learning to play an instrument? This sort of thing *used* to be "learn as a kid or never!" but nowadays (perhaps thanks to increased lifespans?) people start in their 70's and so forth!

So is it just a skill or nothing sort of situation?

I have an interest in drawing... I always have, I was encouraged to quit though because I'd end up getting distracted by it in school and all that. I acknowledge I'm not good though, I mean I enjoy it and I'd love to improve but I'm not 'good'.

I guess in a way I'm indirectly asking whether I should try and get better over time, or if it's a lost cause.

Thoughts or opinions are welcome. It's a topic I haven't thought about much.




posted on Jun, 9 2008 @ 02:48 AM
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I cannot draw or paint the way an artist can. No matter how many times I have been shown. I may draw when I am being shown but to do a beautiful painting on my own, its not going to happen.

However, my husband did take drawing lessons…. As a child in a book he taught himself. There’s nothing he can’t draw. He’s excellent.

He’s very artistic and talented. He showed me the same book. No good for me. Just don’t work the same not for me anyways.



posted on Jun, 9 2008 @ 09:11 PM
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In my case, due to some color vision problems I typically draw in black and white. On my computer however I work in color. The most important thing that I can tell you is to do this for yourself. Not to please others. I'll admit that none of my stuff is really great but I have fun since it's strictly for me to enjoy.

That's the important thing. Do it for yourself. Have fun!



posted on Jun, 9 2008 @ 09:44 PM
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With practice you can do anything..the question is, do you have the patience to learn without getting discouraged. It is not something that will come overnight if that's what you want to know. It may even take you years of practice to get right, but I believe you can learn to draw if you really want to. I have just known how to draw all my life. But at the same time, I wasn't always as good as I am now. Practice is even necessary for the seasoned artist. But I believe you can learn just about anything if you really want to learn.



posted on Jun, 9 2008 @ 09:46 PM
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reply to post by Duality
 


I was an architecture minor and so I have taken a couple drawing classes. I'm not a natural artist either, but enjoyed drawing nonetheless. I would suggest taking a class. It can be very beneficial and you'll see how talented some people are (get a bench mark).



posted on Jun, 10 2008 @ 04:20 AM
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Anyone can learn how to draw.

What it requires is study and determination. To draw lifelike figures you need to study anatomy and the size relationships between, ie, a leg and an arm to a head and torso. There are wonderful little wooden mannekins, which can be used as a guide.

To draw an object you need to consider the space in which it sits much in the way a sculptor chips a block of stone to arrive at the intended shape hidden inside.

To point out the difference between an artist and a crafter in drawing is the love of the line and a subjective feeling for what is 'right'. Anyone can learn how to draw, but it takes an artist to create meaning and emotion within the drawing.

40 years ago in art school my abilities as a portrait artist surpassed anyone in my class, but over the years, having lost interest in the craft (cameras do it better), I also lost the ability to quick sketch facial features.

Which proves (to me) that drawing a reasonable portrait is a learned 'art' and not an innate ability reserved only for the reborn Leonardo Da Vinci.s out there.



posted on Jun, 10 2008 @ 06:36 AM
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Ahh wow thanks for the input everyone. You make some good points about doing it for yourself not others, as well as knowing it is a long term goal.

I picked up a really cheap but comprehensive/progressive art book that I'm too happy with. It should help out a lot.

I'm thinking of giving myself the challenge of drawing every day during my holidays.
Hopefully in those 3-4 weeks I'll see some improvement (no matter how minor). It's a good opportunity for me to get back 'into' it regularly anyway and it's not exactly a chore for me.

Anyway, thanks for the encouragement. I'd love to get good at it. Here goes nothing...



posted on Jun, 10 2008 @ 08:27 AM
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reply to post by Duality
 


Thats an excellent attitude you have there! and its great your pursuing your interest!!!....

Im an A* art student, but i never created a career out of it, because i didnt want it to become mundane and a chore.... for me though i seem to have just one skill in art.... i can copy images perfectly, for example, if you gave me a picture of something the size of a playing card, i could then draw that picture but on a much much larger scale and get all the proportions correct... and vice versa, i could copy a large image and fit it onto a very small piece of paper..... im not sure what this is called or if it even has a name...

I cant paint to save my life though! and landscapes always amaze me too!



posted on Jun, 10 2008 @ 07:14 PM
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reply to post by cosmicstorm
 


Thanks Cosmicstorm, that's a cool skill you have! I know what you mean about not wanting it as a career, before I chose the degree at university I'm doing now, I was looking at a 'creative industries' degree.

I could've done pretty much anything... concept art work, 3D design/modelling, photography even... I thought I'd try something like that. It seemed like it'd be pretty high pressure though and that wear down any will to 'create' I had pretty rapidly.

Anyway... Best of luck with your own art and thanks. =)



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