Tuscan 'Excalibur' Mystery to be Unearthed

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posted on Mar, 3 2004 @ 07:10 PM
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Has anyone heard about this...

Known as the "sword in the stone," the Tuscan "Excalibur" is said to have been plunged into a rock in 1180 by Galgano Guidotti, a medieval knight who renounced war and worldly goods to become a hermit.

dsc.discovery.com...




posted on Mar, 3 2004 @ 07:19 PM
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Wow interesting. I hadn't heard of that before. Nice find and Welcome back!
Keep us updated on this. It's really interesting.



posted on Mar, 3 2004 @ 08:07 PM
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Excalibur, in Latin, equates to Ex Calx Liberatus. meaning: From the Stone Freed.

I posted this awhile back and may serve to aid this topic further:
www.abovetopsecret.com...



Interestingly, I have read that the Welsh name for Arthur's sword was Caledfwlch, pronounced Caled-Folk, which meant: Forked Lightning.

I, IMHO, believe that the legend of the Sword-in-the-Stone originated from the Sarmatian's, who were Eastern European and who had a unit, within the Roman occupation army, and who were stationed or posted in Western Britain, when it was still a Roman Province. The Sarmatian's fought mainly on horseback and worshipped an image of a sword-in-a-stone. As such, this may have been adopted as a theme by the British tribes, who were influenced by this Sarmatian cutural belief, living in that area where the Sarmatian unit was posted. Accordingly, they may have adopted the Dragon or the symbolism of the Dragon, which interestingly enough, was one of the images on a legionary unit standard (standard/symbol of a Legion) that was also stationed there. This, later on, could or may have been incorporated into their British themes/stories/myths/legends of "Pendragon".

Information has it that this legend of Arthur and the Sword is mainly influenced and engrained in Celtic legends. Nonetheless, the symbolism of the 'sword beiing pulled from a/the stone' is very powerful.

William/SkepticOverlord had mentioned in my posting of this, that the sword came from the Lady of the Lake. According to myths/legends/stories, this is true, but the Lady of the Lake gave the sword to Merlin, who in turn, embedded the Excalibur in the stone so that the one and true king would be determined by his righteous, indicative of the True King of Britain, and most assurdedly, would be possibly pre-determined or determined by the sword itself when it was grabbed by the 'One' who attempted to withdraw it from the stone.



regards
seekerof

[Edited on 3-3-2004 by Seekerof]



posted on Mar, 3 2004 @ 08:50 PM
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This is probably one of the better things I have seen on ATS. It's plain, simple, no confusing 'aliens did this with a comet because the NWO told them to'...

All that, and the fact that it's just cool! I'd say even better than the finding of Gilgamesh's tomb. Just think, a legend, an act of fiction, possibly true... and it's something we can actually bare witness to.

All Hail Guidotti, King of the Britons!

This may sound sarcastic, but it isn't. This, to me, is a really great find.



posted on Mar, 4 2004 @ 07:50 AM
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Originally posted by soothsayer
All Hail Guidotti, King of the Britons!
This may sound sarcastic, but it isn't. This, to me, is a really great find.


Isn't there also a part of the legend, that when England is in dire need , the "one" as Seekerof put would return to set things right?



posted on Mar, 4 2004 @ 07:52 AM
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I seen it , I didnt think it was ATS worthy.

Guess I was wrong, thats what I get for thinking.


[Edited on 4-3-2004 by SpittinCobra]



posted on Mar, 4 2004 @ 07:57 AM
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don't respond if it isn't worthy


But seriously, I don't much about the Arthur legends to say if this is the return or not... all I know about King Arthur I saw on the movie Excaliber.



posted on Mar, 4 2004 @ 08:17 AM
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Originally posted by NetStorm
Isn't there also a part of the legend, that when England is in dire need , the "one" as Seekerof put would return to set things right?

Yes, though interestingly enough, this is not the only king with the same legends.

Pitt's legends resource has a nice page of them:
www.pitt.edu...



posted on Mar, 4 2004 @ 08:26 AM
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Originally posted by Byrd
Pitt's legends resource has a nice page of them:
www.pitt.edu...


Cool thanks for the link. Lots of sleeping people out there.



posted on Mar, 4 2004 @ 08:33 AM
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DENNIS: Listen -- strange women lying in ponds distributing swords is no basis for a system of government. Supreme executive power derives from a mandate from the masses, not from some farcical aquatic ceremony. ARTHUR: Be quiet! DENNIS: Well you can't expect to wield supreme executive power just 'cause some watery tart threw a sword at you! ARTHUR: Shut up! DENNIS: I mean, if I went around sayin' I was an empereror just because some moistened bint had lobbed a scimitar at me they'd put me away! ARTHUR: Shut up! Will you shut up! DENNIS: Ah, now we see the violence inherent in the system. ARTHUR: Shut up! DENNIS: Oh! Come and see the violence inherent in the system! HELP! HELP! I'm being repressed! ARTHUR: Bloody peasant!



posted on Mar, 4 2004 @ 08:36 AM
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Almost forgot about The Holy Grail!



posted on Mar, 4 2004 @ 12:35 PM
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The link about the find in the first post is dead. Does anybody know if there is a mirror site?



posted on Mar, 4 2004 @ 12:38 PM
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It's working, just tried it... but I'll look if you want



posted on Mar, 8 2004 @ 12:49 PM
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working now! my internet connection has been having alot of trouble lately. sorry.



posted on Mar, 8 2004 @ 12:59 PM
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Originally posted by SkepticOverlord
DENNIS: Listen -- strange women lying in ponds distributing swords is no basis for a system of government. Supreme executive power derives from a mandate from the masses, not from some farcical aquatic ceremony.

ARTHUR: Be quiet!

DENNIS: Well you can't expect to wield supreme executive power just 'cause some watery tart threw a sword at you!

ARTHUR: Shut up!



...now go away, or I will be forced to taunt you a second time, you silly english k-nig-ht...



posted on Mar, 8 2004 @ 01:45 PM
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Hey, that's a really interesting post there!


Stuff like that always fascinated me. I wonder if the sword is really old, if there's really a complete sword (I mean blade) and how the f*ck did it ended being stuck in the stone like that.

A knight would have to have a incredible strenght, and a damn sharp blade to be able to "plant" it in stone like that, am I right?



posted on Mar, 9 2004 @ 07:20 AM
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Behind every myth and legend, there is a piece of truth. It just so happens that the King Arthur legend was based on this sword... maybe.

It is rather cool, though. How would we be able to duplicate it? We could chip and drill into the stone, so that the sword would fit... but imagine the time it would take; I guess if anyone wanted to become famous and find Excalibre, this'd be the way to go. Then, too, there'd be tool marks... I don't know anything about sculpting, but I am assuming it be nearly impossible to smooth out an inside radius that a sword would make.

Will definitly have to keep my eyes open for this one...



posted on Mar, 22 2004 @ 11:33 PM
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Nice find
. Anyone suddenly get the urge to try their hand at pulling on the sword?


I was wondering though if the sword in the stone is just a tombstone. It is straight in like a tombstone cross and the article above stated something about a burial area.


JON

posted on Mar, 23 2004 @ 03:24 AM
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That sword had to get there somhow, And since it's still there dosen't that mean King Arthur never pulled the sword from the stone. Or maybe swords placed in stones were common back then



posted on Apr, 5 2004 @ 09:13 AM
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It's funny how they havent tried to dig into the room...?





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