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Unexplained ground heat burns boy's feet

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posted on Jun, 6 2008 @ 04:01 AM
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Unexplained ground heat burns boy's feet


www.koaa.com

There was no fire, but the ground was hot enough in a Colorado Springs park to burn through an eight year old boy’s shoes and cause at least second degree burns on his feet. The boy went the hospital. His Crocs style shoes that were left behind have big holes with burned edges.
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Jun, 6 2008 @ 04:01 AM
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Wow how could this happin? Surely the sun couldnt heat the ground that much to burn holes in leather

www.koaa.com
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Jun, 6 2008 @ 04:16 AM
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They say it's coal on the ground that was ignited by the sun....huh?


What they found has a relatively simple solution according to Kurt Schroeder with Colorado Springs Parks, "What the state representatives indicated to us is that the coal spoil that's been on top of the ground for years and years reacts with the sun, heat of the sun and it spontaneously combusts.


...which sounds absolutely ludicrous to me. Exactly how hot is it in Colorade right now?

Source: www.koaa.com...



posted on Jun, 6 2008 @ 04:22 AM
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reply to post by Evasius
 


Its 65°F | 43°F in colorado right now



posted on Jun, 6 2008 @ 04:35 AM
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Didn't one of Tesla's experiments heat the ground, causing the soles of peoples' shoes to melt?



posted on Jun, 6 2008 @ 04:43 AM
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reply to post by Truther
 


Wow. BTW, crocs are not made of leather, they are made of rubber like material, I think they are the ugliest shoes on earth. About this incident, I have never heard of anything like it, but when I read the story I thought about Atlanta GA, right now, the water in the resevoirs has been heating up too much, causing the cool water to rise and forming stinky algae , the news has been reporting that although it stinks and tastes bad, it is safe to drink, ( I'll be damned if I would drink it). It is not even summer yet, last year we started a record breaking drought, and never came out of it, still under water restrictions we are always praying for rain, but instead we are getting tornadoes. Anyway, my point was that they are also trying to find out why the water is heating up like it is, this story reminded me of it. Great post OP!



posted on Jun, 6 2008 @ 04:47 AM
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Don't wanna be a thread killer but here's the other ATS thread

No oneline this time boss



posted on Jun, 6 2008 @ 04:48 AM
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reply to post by Truther
 


Well their official explanation is ridiculous then. I've heard of solar cooking - even with hot stones in the ground. However for coal on the surface to be ignited by the Sun, there needs to be some sort of magnifier or an open flame and flammable propellant.

Example: Here's a solar oven that 'reaches temperatures of 360 to 400 degrees Fahrenheit!'

www.eartheasy.com...

That's far below the 800 they detected.

[edit on 6/6/08 by Evasius]



posted on Jun, 6 2008 @ 04:56 AM
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reply to post by flice
 


Be silent!



posted on Jun, 6 2008 @ 05:29 AM
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I'm thinking of an undergroung coal or peat fire. There are lot's of cases of such fires burning underground for years, undetected.


Peat has a high carbon content and can burn under low moisture conditions. Once ignited by the presence of a heat source (e.g. a wildfire penetrating the subsurface), it smoulders. These smouldering fires can burn undetected for very long periods of time (months, years and even centuries) propagating in a creeping fashion through the underground peat layer.




Mine fires can burn for very long periods of time (from months to centuries), until the seam in which they smoulder is exhausted. They propagate in a creeping fashion along mines shafts and cracks. Because they are underground, they are extremely difficult and costly to reach and extinguish. There is a strong similarity between mine fires and peat fires.



posted on Jun, 6 2008 @ 05:35 AM
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Already here:


www.abovetopsecret.com...


Please contribute to the existing discussion, thank you

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