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'Ice' found underneath Mars lander

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posted on Jun, 1 2008 @ 02:36 PM
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reply to post by The time lord
 


I'm pretty sure that if the scientists could find everything they ever wanted about Mars in one mission, they would do that. My money is on the fact that their thirst for knowledge outweighs delaying the finding of such knowledge by years in order to scrounge money for another mission.




posted on Jun, 1 2008 @ 02:40 PM
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reply to post by rikriley
 



This is what NASA has to say about that picture.


The bright-looking surface material in the center, where the image is partly overexposed may not be inherently brighter than the foreground material in shadow.



So, to me anyway, it is the bright, smooth character of the substance in the center of the picture that suggests ice, but if that material is the same color of the material in the foreground which is clearly soil, then that would suggest rock.

However, looking to the right of the large bright spot is an area of material that does seem to be pooled as if it might have flowed from the larger area.

Of course, by next week, the lander will have scooped out that material and soon after we should have an analysis. Then we will know. I hope.


[edit on 2008/6/1 by GradyPhilpott]



posted on Jun, 1 2008 @ 03:07 PM
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Just because it walks like ice and quacks like ice, doesn't make it ice. Everyone knows there's no possible way for frozen molecules of hydrogen and oxygen to be found anywhere but Earth. These atoms are so rare the chances are astronomical. And we all know these atoms hate each other.

And it's most definitely not true that in the distant past Earth stole most of the water from Mars when the two planets passed close to one another which caused a great flood on Earth. There is absolutely no geological evidence for that.

So all you people looking to have yourself a Martian Ice Tea will just have to suck it up and enjoy the Earth variety.

Edit: Getting my science right.

[edit on 1-6-2008 by General Izer]



posted on Jun, 1 2008 @ 03:07 PM
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Originally posted by RUFFREADY
Why not just tie a portapotty toilet (like those at construction sites) to the space station?? It makes sense to me. I mean you could make it out-side the space station and inside artificial gravity and go do your business! And I'm not a rocket surgeon or anything ..But if I were aboard the space station I'd welcome a portapotty instead of what those nerds at NASA hooked up inside that don't work worth a crap.

[edit on 1-6-2008 by RUFFREADY]


At first, I thought this had to be a troll post...but reading on, I'm not sure, so (somewhat against my better judgment) here's an answer:

The porta-potty isn't air-tight (as anyone who's ever been on a construction site can attest). On a construction site, that's bad. On the ISS, it's fatal, not just to the user, but to the entire crew. It's also not climate controlled, which has all sorts of amusing implications for use on-orbit. By the time you make it air-tight, climate-controlled, and otherwise suitable for use in zero-g, it's going to cost as much as a small ISS module.

Where in the name of Heinlein did you get the idea that the ISS has "artificial gravity", anyhow?



posted on Jun, 1 2008 @ 03:15 PM
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Originally posted by General Izer
Just because it walks like ice and quacks like ice, doesn't make it ice. Everyone knows there's no possible way for frozen molecules of hydrogen and oxygen to be found anywhere but Earth. These molecules are so rare the chances are astronomical.


Ahh...the aroma of vintage sarcasm. Love it!




And it's most definitely not true that in the distant past Earth stole most of the water from Mars when the two planets passed close to one another which caused a great flood on Earth. There is absolutely no geological evidence for that.


*double-take*
Say what? I don't suppose you have a source for this theory? Links to evidence, perhaps?



So all you people looking to have yourself a Martian Ice Tea will just have to suck it up and enjoy the Earth variety.
:

I beg to differ.

Martian Iced Tea:
1 measure each of Vodka, Tequila, Rum, Gin, and Triple-Sec. Measure and a half of sour mix, and a splash of strawberry Nehi. Mix over ice, pour into shaker, shake once, briskly, pour back into glass, garnish with lemon.
*hic*



posted on Jun, 1 2008 @ 03:26 PM
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reply to post by GradyPhilpott
 


I am by no means an expert in space, planets, and for that matter posting on ATS.

But taking into account the "soil " in the forground shows two distinct shades of gray. It seems to me that the darker shade is obviously the "soil" that was disturbed in the landing.

Taking that into account, in my mind as a gardener, the darker "soil" should be to some degree damp, if not wet. If it were dry "soil", it would appear fluffier than the other, but not a deeper color.

Just my opinion of course. I vote that it is water ice.



posted on Jun, 1 2008 @ 03:40 PM
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reply to post by gottago
 



if NASA finds water ice at somewhere else other than the polar, white, ice caps, then that Proof allows a degree of engineering deviations in the planned Mars habitats.

Its sure not a waste of money to my sensibility,
and besides U of A and ASU have been high profile universities in space & cosmos exploration ove the decades --- its not pork barrel busy work monies awarded to those research facilities



posted on Jun, 1 2008 @ 03:56 PM
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$420 to find water on Mars when you could spend that finding water in Africa maybe?

Or we need to explore Mars because one day our greed and conflicts will drive us out of Earth to a new Planet so we can avoid each other, untill that planet goes into a civil war and they try the next one along.



posted on Jun, 1 2008 @ 03:59 PM
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Originally posted by Brother Stormhammer
*double-take*
Say what? I don't suppose you have a source for this theory? Links to evidence, perhaps?

Absolutely not. That is such a hair-brained theory one can only shake their head at the thought of it. And it would be a fools journey for anyone to attempt to research such a theory on their own. I certainly wouldn't suggest it.



Originally posted by Brother Stormhammer
I beg to differ.

Martian Iced Tea:
1 measure each of Vodka, Tequila, Rum, Gin, and Triple-Sec. Measure and a half of sour mix, and a splash of strawberry Nehi. Mix over ice, pour into shaker, shake once, briskly, pour back into glass, garnish with lemon.

Oh yea, right. Next your going to tell me we can drink alien secretions.



posted on Jun, 1 2008 @ 04:15 PM
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lol..this is not new

NASA is the complete loss..we have known about ice for a long time.


do a google search on "mars pictures"

they need to start droppin some real knowledge...i'm getting pissed



posted on Jun, 1 2008 @ 04:23 PM
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Originally posted by General Izer
Just because it walks like ice and quacks like ice, doesn't make it ice. Everyone knows there's no possible way for frozen molecules of hydrogen and oxygen to be found anywhere but Earth.
[edit on 1-6-2008 by General Izer]



You are obviously wrong, and most likely a troll.


If you were right and "everyone knows there's no possible way for frozen molecules of hydrogen and oxygen to be found anywhere but earth", then NASA wouldn't be sending missions to mars to look for any.

And, by the way, on what axioms do you base this wild and outlandish claim that there can't be frozen water anywhere but on earth? Sure is a big Universe last time I checked.


Bah... Another troll.

[edit on 1-6-2008 by Quazga]



posted on Jun, 1 2008 @ 04:25 PM
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Originally posted by The time lord
$420 to find water on Mars when you could spend that finding water in Africa maybe?

Or we need to explore Mars because one day our greed and conflicts will drive us out of Earth to a new Planet so we can avoid each other, untill that planet goes into a civil war and they try the next one along.



That's pretty much the idea. We are consumers, so we must find new worlds to consume. Gotta problem with that?



posted on Jun, 1 2008 @ 04:25 PM
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Dupe, please delete.

[edit on 1-6-2008 by Quazga]



posted on Jun, 1 2008 @ 04:32 PM
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Originally posted by Quazga

Originally posted by The time lord
$420 to find water on Mars when you could spend that finding water in Africa maybe?

Or we need to explore Mars because one day our greed and conflicts will drive us out of Earth to a new Planet so we can avoid each other, untill that planet goes into a civil war and they try the next one along.



That's pretty much the idea. We are consumers, so we must find new worlds to consume. Gotta problem with that?


Depends if we ever escape this world because once we realise we can only go so far we have people on this world who will be a bit angry about all the money spent on nothing when more could have been done to help its own human race.

Of course there is water like substance on Mars is that not the idea of Satellites detecting it? Or is that a lie and then they need to send a probe to be even more sure that white patch on Mars is not ice cream. If they wanted to send a probe they could send 5 at the same time all landing in different areas, must be cheaper than doing single landings.

Not just saying this at you but for all to hear.

[edit on 1-6-2008 by The time lord]



posted on Jun, 1 2008 @ 04:37 PM
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Originally posted by Skipper1975
..we have known about ice for a long time.


I think this is the first time NASA has been in a position to test water for evidence of life.

The polar caps have been observed for many a decade.


Sharp new images received Saturday from the Phoenix lander largely convinced scientists that the spacecraft's thrusters had uncovered a large patch of ice just below the Martian surface, team members said.

That bodes well for the mission's main goal of digging for ice that can be tested for evidence of organic compounds that are the chemical building blocks of life.

www.foxnews.com...



posted on Jun, 1 2008 @ 04:39 PM
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reply to post by The time lord
 



We have two hopes.

1. World wide cataclysm, serious culling of the human race.

2. Explore other worlds to make room for different modes of human existence.


I'm all for spending money on #2.

Hopefully I won't have to experience #1.



posted on Jun, 1 2008 @ 04:47 PM
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Originally posted by St Udio
reply to post by gottago
 



if NASA finds water ice at somewhere else other than the polar, white, ice caps, then that Proof allows a degree of engineering deviations in the planned Mars habitats.



So you're saying that this is a first step in drawing up guidelines for terraforming Mars? Seems way ahead of the game--any info on that you could point to for further reading?

[edit on 1-6-2008 by gottago]



posted on Jun, 1 2008 @ 04:50 PM
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Originally posted by The time lord
$420 to find water on Mars when you could spend that finding water in Africa maybe?

Or we need to explore Mars because one day our greed and conflicts will drive us out of Earth to a new Planet so we can avoid each other, untill that planet goes into a civil war and they try the next one along.


Hi time lord, I think you meant to say $420 million dollars U.S. spent on the Phoenix Lander mission by NASA to find water and this figure equates to approx. $1.00 U.S. per mile spent for the mission. Lets hope we get the biggest bang for the buck with the tax payers money.

Yes we humans are prone to making war and sometimes peace but it is not a bad idea to look for an alternative place to live in case the Earth has a catastrophic event including a nuclear war. Rik Riley



posted on Jun, 1 2008 @ 05:03 PM
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reply to post by General Izer
 





And it's most definitely not true that in the distant past Earth stole most of the water from Mars when the two planets passed close to one another which caused a great flood on Earth. There is absolutely no geological evidence for that.


Interesting idea. I have never heard of this one before. Is it possible for such an event to have happened in our distant past? I mean it would seem that the two planets would have had to have been so close to one another in order for water to relocate from one to the other, that the gravitational pull would have caused a massive colision of sorts. Also, if that did happen, then it begs the question regarding the origin of Mars, and if it was actually the great usurper, or Niberu? What about the astroid belt? So many unanswered questions, but plenty of ideas...



posted on Jun, 1 2008 @ 05:07 PM
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Originally posted by gottago
So you're saying that this is a first step in drawing up guidelines for terraforming Mars? Seems way ahead of the game--any info on that you could point to for further reading?


I don't know about terraforming, but manned missions are in the works and since the planet is so far away, having some available nutrients on-site would make things go more smoothly, but that could be a long time in the future.

www.theregister.co.uk...

en.wikipedia.org...

news.bbc.co.uk...

news.bbc.co.uk...

/63xbyf




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