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So if the buildings where brought down by explosion

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posted on Jul, 4 2008 @ 06:47 AM
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Originally posted by Damocles
cuz, as a "demo guy" in the army, we didnt use "thermite cutters" and honestly had never heard of them.


Did your job in the Army ever concern briging down buildings?

Have you ever heard of or seen chemical and mechanical beam cutters?

You do know that fire rescue teams have the equipment and knowledge to cut beams for rescue work?




posted on Jul, 4 2008 @ 12:47 PM
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reply to post by ULTIMA1
 



Did your job in the Army ever concern briging down buildings?

Have you ever heard of or seen chemical and mechanical beam cutters?

You do know that fire rescue teams have the equipment and knowledge to cut beams for rescue work?


Did your job as a crew chief in the air force ever concern bringing down buildings? Have you ever used a chemical or mechanical beam cutter?

I guess I didnt realize crew chiefs in the air force has more knowledge on the workings of demolitions than someone in the field. Interesting.



posted on Jul, 4 2008 @ 08:45 PM
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Originally posted by Anonymous ATS
Did your job as a crew chief in the air force ever concern bringing down buildings? Have you ever used a chemical or mechanical beam cutter?


I never claimed to be a demo expert. But i have had some basic explosive training and had a friend that was EOD in the Army.

What is your explosive or demo experience?



posted on Jul, 4 2008 @ 09:22 PM
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I have to say the towers where brought down by Demolition
Here is video.

thewebfairy.com...

We all would have to be blind to think it was anything else.



posted on Jul, 4 2008 @ 10:19 PM
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Originally posted by ULTIMA1
Did your job in the Army ever concern briging down buildings?

no, and you would be hard pressed to find where i ever said i did. however, cutting an I beam or box column attatched to a bridge wouldnt be any different than cutting one attatched to a building. its just a matter of which ones and in what order to cut. its going to take the same ordinance calculations and so forth.


Have you ever heard of or seen chemical and mechanical beam cutters?

heard of them, yes. read anything that would indicate that they are of any use in dropping a building? no. most of what ive seen for them is in cutting pipes for oil drilling uses. if you have more info on them, id love to read it.


You do know that fire rescue teams have the equipment and knowledge to cut beams for rescue work?

yes, i was trained as a paramedic and did a lot of work with fire depts in addition to doing some WMD terrorism response training with fire and police from around the country...most notably guys from NYPD and FDNY and while they/we were trained to do such things for rescue work, no one mentioned any training in brining down buildings...even in my IC training it was never mentioned.

i asked this of you before cuz i know youve had some IC training as well, which particular publication or manual covered having the authority to drop buildings? i must have missed it and while im no longer in the field id like to read it just for my own knowledge. which manual was that?



Originally posted by cashlink
We all would have to be blind to think it was anything else.

well then i guess im blind. ive yet to see anything that makes me think it was done with high explosives so if you have something that would prove it to me, cool, ill stand corrected. but knowing how much ordinance it would take to cut even a single column in the core much less enough of them to bring the building down im going to stick with my opinion that it wasnt done with HE.

and since ive also never seen anything that would indicate that thermite can cut horizontally through 2"+ steel, im going to remain unconvinced it was thermite either.

again, just my opinions



posted on Jul, 4 2008 @ 10:29 PM
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Originally posted by Damocles
i asked this of you before cuz i know youve had some IC training as well, which particular publication or manual covered having the authority to drop buildings? i must have missed it and while im no longer in the field id like to read it just for my own knowledge. which manual was that?


Well i have to see if i can find it, but i do believe that fire marshalls / fire chiefs have the authority to bring down a building.

Plus you know that the incident commander at WTC would not have been alone in deciding to bring down a building.



posted on Jul, 4 2008 @ 10:54 PM
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Originally posted by ULTIMA1


Plus you know that the incident commander at WTC would not have been alone in deciding to bring down a building.



probably not, by why keep it a secret? theres no reason i can think of...

not a one liner



posted on Jul, 4 2008 @ 11:41 PM
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Originally posted by Damocles
probably not, by why keep it a secret? theres no reason i can think of...


Well maybe becasue it would no go along with the story that it was all done by terrorist hitting the towers and causing building 7 to collapse.



posted on Jul, 5 2008 @ 12:38 AM
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reply to post by ULTIMA1
 


i suppose its as good of a theory as any really.

im just unconvinced.



posted on Jul, 5 2008 @ 02:34 AM
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reply to post by Pilgrum
 


WTC follow up discussion on uses of thermite/thermate. Read carefully. More importantly demand that the the WTC new investigative panel reviews ALL evidence previously found at site....the same site that was cleaned up before investigators had a chance to properly examine all the evidence which is a violation of proper crime scene investigative procedures.
[edit] Military uses
Thermite hand grenades are used as incendiary devices to destroy enemy equipment quickly. Additionally, thermite grenades are used by friendly forces to destroy their own items and equipment when there is imminent danger of capture. Because standard iron-thermite is difficult to ignite, burns with practically no flame and has a small radius of action, standard thermite is rarely used on its own as an incendiary composition. It is more usually employed with other ingredients added to enhance its incendiary effects. Thermate-TH3 is a mixture of thermite and pyrotechnic additives which have been found to be superior to standard thermite for incendiary purposes. Its composition by weight is generally 68.7% thermite, 29.0% barium nitrate, 2.0% sulfur and 0.3% binder (such as PBAN). Addition of barium nitrate to thermite increases its thermal effect, creates flame in burning and significantly reduces the ignition temperature. Although the primary purpose of Thermate-TH3 is as an incendiary, it will also weld metal surfaces together.

A classic military use for thermite is disabling artillery pieces and it has been used for this purpose since the Second World War. Thermite can permanently disable artillery pieces without the use of explosive charges and therefore can be used with a reasonable amount of stealth. There are several ways to do this. By far the most destructive method is to weld the weapon shut by inserting one or more armed thermite grenades into the breech and then quickly closing it. This makes the weapon impossible to load. An alternative method is to insert an armed thermite grenade down the muzzle of the artillery piece, fouling the barrel. This makes the piece very dangerous to fire. Yet another method is to use thermite to weld the traversing and elevation mechanism of the weapon, making it impossible to aim properly.

Thermite was also used in both German and Allied incendiary bombs during WWII. Incendiary bombs usually consisted of dozens of thin thermite-filled canisters (bomblets) ignited by a magnesium fuse. Incendiary bombs destroyed entire cities due to the raging fires that resulted from their use. Cities that primarily consisted of wooden buildings were especially susceptible. These incendiary bombs were utilized primarily during night time air raids. Bomb sights could not be used at night, creating the need to use munitions that could destroy targets without the need for precision placement.
en.wikipedia.org...



posted on Jul, 5 2008 @ 07:21 AM
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reply to post by oceanaut1
 


I was familiar with thermite well before 9/11 and the main uses were, as confirmed in your post, welding and incendiary devices but I've never seen it used for demolition purposes. I think it would actually be a very bad choice for breaking up a complex steel structure for reasons of timing & unpredictability so the only reason I see for it even being suggested as an explanation for the collapses is the absence of large explosions (I mean large enough to destroy massive steel beams & columns) as it's quiet.



posted on Jul, 7 2008 @ 01:39 AM
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Originally posted by Damocles
i suppose its as good of a theory as any really.


Well maybe if NIST would have been professional enough to recover steel from buidling 7 for testing and do a proper report we could have some answers but since that have made many mistakes and thier reports are contidictory we will have a hard time finding actual evidence.





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