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Did Mars Phoenix pop a spring, lose a screw or what?

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posted on Jun, 2 2008 @ 02:23 PM
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Originally posted by easynow
what are the odds of a screw falling into that little hole it seems to be in ?




you are not serious?

are you?




posted on Jun, 2 2008 @ 02:29 PM
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Originally posted by InfaRedMan
No matter when the image was taken, it definitely appears to be a bleached shell from some type of sea snail. All I can surmise is that Mars once had an atmosphere that shielded the surface from the UV that current bombards it today because that kind of snail (which usually lives in shallows) both in and out of the water would not last a minute being hit by so much radiation etc.

Image Sourced From seashellworld"





IRM


S&F 4 U!

[edit on 2/6/08 by InfaRedMan]


No, it really doesn't. It resembles the sea shell you posted, but the opening on the end of the shell is half as wide as the object in the sand. This to me is a much better match:








posted on Jun, 2 2008 @ 02:32 PM
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Originally posted by gormly

Originally posted by easynow
what are the odds of a screw falling into that little hole it seems to be in ?




you are not serious?

are you?



The odds are exactly the same as those meteors that seem to always fall into those huge craters.



posted on Jun, 2 2008 @ 02:45 PM
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looks like flexible pvc tubing to me. but yeah that is only possible if it is a picture taken on earth where it is under the sand and is sprung up accidentally.



posted on Jun, 2 2008 @ 03:20 PM
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and they wonder why we have not landed man on the moon, when they get there there will be no ship left, all the screws on the planet and a few dead corps floating around the place. Good old NASA, they can't even get this one right.



posted on Jun, 2 2008 @ 03:34 PM
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Daft question, but how do we know this picture isn't a hoax?



posted on Jun, 2 2008 @ 03:36 PM
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Originally posted by Essan
Daft question, but how do we know this picture isn't a hoax?


It is from NASA.

We know it's a hoax!



posted on Jun, 2 2008 @ 03:39 PM
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reply to post by skibtz
 


Well exactly, people don't believe anything NASA produce .... so if it's a NASA image we should ignore it. But (I may have missed the link) on the other hand, is this image actually on a NASA website?



posted on Jun, 2 2008 @ 04:18 PM
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Before they could use the arm and bucket im sure they said that they had to remove the restraints that were used to hold it in place while in transit.So could this not be a part of that??

Im finding it hard to beleive its a fossil as its sat in a layer of dust on top of the ice i would have thought any fossil would be in the top of the ice if anywhere.

just a thought



posted on Jun, 2 2008 @ 04:37 PM
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If it's a fossil it could verry well be an organism that has the reputation of surviving the most hostile climates. Like the tubeworm for instance.




Looks a lot like a spring too.



posted on Jun, 2 2008 @ 04:44 PM
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Obviously a spring, it's perfectly round on the top and perfectly horizontal on the side and you can clearly see that it is hollow through the center, what kind of fossil is going to be hollow like that and perfectly symmetrical. Last night I heard on the radio some nasa guy talking about the progress and he just barely slipped in that one of the instruments was damaged and not working properly but it was so minor and in no way inhibiting their progress that it isn't even worth focusing on.



posted on Jun, 2 2008 @ 05:01 PM
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Originally posted by Essan
...is this image actually on a NASA website?


Lo Essan

These images did originate from the official NASA Phoenix website.

However, I am totally appalled at the ridiculously small resolution and low quality.

Millions of US tax dollars and many years in the making yet they didn't even stick a decent camera on the thing!

Smart guys over at NASA eh?!!



posted on Jun, 2 2008 @ 06:21 PM
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Originally posted by skibtz

Originally posted by Essan
...is this image actually on a NASA website?


Lo Essan

These images did originate from the official NASA Phoenix website.

However, I am totally appalled at the ridiculously small resolution and low quality.

Millions of US tax dollars and many years in the making yet they didn't even stick a decent camera on the thing!

Smart guys over at NASA eh?!!


They may just not be using it right now. I'm hoping they do have a hi-res camera on board. Still, you gotta give NASA props for safely landing a lander on the Mars surface where so many other attempts have failed.



posted on Jun, 2 2008 @ 07:43 PM
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I have posted a 300 % increase of the spring like artifact seen next to what NASA believes to be the ice. I would like to point out that this object looks like it would be rather light weight so i would suppose a light object when dropped would create a rather shallow hole or impression on the surface of the hole. If this were a rather heavy object I could see where it could drop into a sandy like surface and partly burier itself in the sand. Also there is a dark hole in the ice that seems to pretty much match the size of the artifact I find this very interesting also, what was in the hole as the lander was descending blasting it with hot rocket exhaust? All food for thought.

openfuelresource.com...



posted on Jun, 2 2008 @ 07:50 PM
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Flag & Star

That's certainly an odd looking something. It's something WE ALL would be interested in knowing more about.

It's too bad that we're all JUST AMATEURS. The REAL SCIENCE is actually somewhere else. The EXPERTS don't bother with anything remotely similar to stuff like this. The REAL SCIENCE is in investigating stuff like the TOTALLY ORDINARY rock on the other side of the picture. That's where THE EXPERTS at NASA will probably look.

What are we doing looking for water at the north pole of Mars anyway? Is NASA turning into a bunch of lawyers? Lawyers try not to ask any questions that they don't already know the answers to. The polar cap looks like it's covered with ice.



Hmm I wonder if we'll find water? Let's spend a few hundred million and answer that question.


Why aren't we going someplace where we don't know what we'll find. If I worked at NASA and had any say about where a mission would go I know exactly where I'd go.



Seems to me that they don't want to really discover anything. Wonder what that means?


[edit on 2-6-2008 by LazyGuy]



posted on Jun, 2 2008 @ 08:07 PM
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reply to post by LazyGuy
 


It means the lander is not on mars its at s-4. Its a spring all right, probably left behind by some technician from his tool box.
It means they already know what is going on on mars, have known since the early 60's, possibly even sooner.
It means they are not about to tell the serfs anything, because the true financers of the secret space program, the Rothschilds, believe it is none of our business, just the same as a farmer doesn't tell the cows in the barn that there are other farms, with other cows, in other places.



posted on Jun, 2 2008 @ 09:01 PM
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It looks to me on the enhanced image that it is almost hollow, like a tube or a hose of some kind. Of course, what would something like that be doing on the surface of Mars? You got me man. Whatever it is, it doesn't look natural. It's either a fossil of some kind or a piece of equipment no one wants to admit losing. If it was my job on the line, I'd keep my mouth shut too.



posted on Jun, 2 2008 @ 09:25 PM
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Springs were used to pop off the protective barrier on the arm.

www.popularmechanics.com...

I have a little trouble accepting this, but it is plausable. My hesitation to accept this is because the two objects we have spotted are both half buried. How do they get half buried if they are deployed after landing?

Maybe wind half buried them.

Another problem with this is that according to this article
www.space.com...
There is only 1 spring involved, and we have spotted appears to be two spring like objects.


The first step of unstowing the arm, expected to occur this afternoon, involves moving the scoop towards the arm with the wrist joint, which will release a spring-loaded pin that kept the arm restrained during Phoenix's August launch and Sunday landing, Goldstein said.



These articles may be talking about two different spring mechanisms. The second article was talking about a detention pin for locking the arm down, and the first article was talking about a sanitary barrier.

It really seems like the lander shot springs out all around it.

[edit on 2-6-2008 by Cyberbian]



posted on Jun, 3 2008 @ 01:35 AM
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To tell you the truth it looks like something live crawling out of the ground...

LOL

I really think it does.



posted on Jun, 3 2008 @ 04:18 AM
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Originally posted by Cyberbian
www.popularmechanics.com...

I have a little trouble accepting this, but it is plausable. My hesitation to accept this is because the two objects we have spotted are both half buried. How do they get half buried if they are deployed after landing?


One would assume that they used pretty strong springs so as to guarantee that the arm was released correctly. They only get one shot at it and if the force of the spring release is not enough, or there was slight damage to the arm then no release. So strong springs are the order of the day.

Now imaging a coiled up spring being released suddenly. If you've even taken apart a door lock or something with a spring inside, you will know that often they can ping off and get totally lost due to the force.. that should easily be able to bury it. (I am assuming that the ground below is not solid rock)



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