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The WORD and Speculative Masonry

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posted on May, 31 2008 @ 05:46 AM
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What has always interested me about "Secret Societies" is, well, the "secrets" that were being held and the way in which these secrets were being woven into popular culture. Since my interest was in the hidden philosophical side of the Illuminatus, as it were, what interested me was "the speculative arts".

Speculative Masonry has many definitions, and I am not wanting to get into an argument as to which is "THE" acceptable and "approved" definition: it is good that a discussion ensue that brings to the surface the many used definitions such that the concept becomes more openly known and discussed.

The more time I spent in research, the more often I came to be introduced to the "conspiracy theorists" who make their living peddling their own fears and paranoia's. What becomes obvious to anyone versed into the Masonic system is that the "conspiracy theorists" quite often do not have a comprehensive understanding of the Speculative Arts, and so often are led down paths built on known deceptions that the "conspiracy theorist", not versed in the tactical use of the Speculative Arts. is too uneducated to grasp.

The "speculative arts" remain a critical key to the larger puzzle defined as "the Construct".

Well, "The Fetch" at his blog, The Illuminatus Observor, has released a new article called "The WORD as a Function of Speculative Masonry" wherein he goes into some of the very basic elements of Speculative Masonry.

The primary theory he puts forward is that the "LOST WORD" is a code for Pi, and that the Alphabet remains a hyper-dimensional representation of this Lost Word.

He quotes Albert Mackay as follows:


The mythical history of Freemasonry informs us that there once existed a WORD of surpassing value, and claiming a profound veneration; that this Word was known to but few; that it was at length lost; and that a temporary substitute for it was adopted. But as the very philosophy of Masonry teaches us that there can be no death without a resurrection,--no decay without a subsequent restoration,--on the same principle it follows that the loss of the Word must suppose its eventual recovery.


He then goes on to show how this WORD is an esoteric construct set against Pi by quoting Blavatsky in "The Secret Doctrine",


But this last ratio is but a modified form of light or 20612 to 6561, as a '[[pi]]' value, being only a variation of the same (that is 20612 to 6561 is 31415 to one, or Alhim or God) -- and in such a manner that one can be made to flow into and be derived from the other, and these are the three steps by which the Unity and sameness can be shown of the divine names. That is, the two are but variations of the same ratio, viz., that of '[[pi]].'


In this article, Fetch links into the actual Candidate's Ritual given to candidates seeking entry into the Ancient, Accepted and Esoteric Freemasons (A., A.E.F).

What is fascinating is that the good will often found in Freemasonry at many levels is completely ignored by so called "researchers" who proclaim themselves "conspiracy theorists".

Dennis Fetcho, aka The Fetch, is perhaps the one of the few authors working in the conspiracy space that has been able to transcend the fear mongering lunacy of the typical conspiracy theorists plodding along and who has been able to penetrate the inner core of the Illuminatus System and deal with it in a rational and focused presentation.

His latest work at the Illuminatus Observor is another effort to take back from the conspiracy theorists their wild eyed speculation and return to the discussion the core meanings that were and remain fused to the inner core of Speculative Freemasonry.

You may not agree with him, but no one can argue that few work as hard to rationally deal with a complex subject.




posted on Jun, 1 2008 @ 05:04 PM
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It is always refreshing to read the work of a conspiracy theorist who appears to be somewhat interested in truth, and not fear mongering and sensationalism. It is most unfortunate that so many of them are not interesting in anything more than a scapegoat when they look at freemasonry.

However, I note his article still has the typical populist propaganda which is required to lure in the rabid section of conspiracy theory sowed throughout it, but I still thought it was a interesting read. I do note much of it is drawn from the "International Lodge of Esoteric Freemasons," which smacks of being a clandestine and unrecognized body.

I think the writer is incorrect, but it is still a refreshing change from a typical anti-mason essay.



posted on Jun, 2 2008 @ 02:14 AM
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Originally posted by ALightinDarkness
It is always refreshing to read the work of a conspiracy theorist who appears to be somewhat interested in truth, and not fear mongering and sensationalism. It is most unfortunate that so many of them are not interesting in anything more than a scapegoat when they look at freemasonry.


You and I agree here. The format has to be enticing, otherwise, no one is going to read it. Even so, this article has done little in views compared to the others here that have been put up by me, so from a marketing point of view, the bogeyman hiding under every pixel of the standard self proclaimed conspiracy experts gets a little old and tiring to read, but often is what the audience is either conditioned or wishes to read.

It is clear that not all Secret Societies can be organized and structured around "evil" and the subjugation of the human race, and our Western culture has benefited richly from the actions and works of more than a few Secret Societies.

The real truth is that there are two systems in play, and one seeks to destroy the good works of the others. Those "conspiracy theorists" who focus on the latter are too ignorant of the former and so are not refined enough to deal with the subject in a rational and educated manner, which is fine when your audience is even less informed than the typical conspiracy theorist.

The problem is, the tactics employed by the typical conspiracy theorist is not refined and lacks insights into the philosophy that both are using, and this creates the conditions where the masses wish to go after the good side of the equation, and the negative side would like nothing better than to see such.

So the conspiracy theorist often, by failing to comprehend the larger game in play, often comes to the aid of the "side" he thinks he is trying to defeat.




I think the writer is incorrect, but it is still a refreshing change from a typical anti-mason essay.


Fair enough. Thanks and appreciate the feedback.

[edit on 2-6-2008 by android1296]

[edit on 2-6-2008 by android1296]

[edit on 2-6-2008 by android1296]



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