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The Medal of Honor (MOH)

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posted on May, 25 2008 @ 07:43 PM
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The Medal of Honor is often called the Congressional Medal of Honor because it was first awarded by Congress. Today, it is still authorized by Congress but is awarded by the Department of Defense. It is awarded to those who distinguish themselves by gallantry in action at the risk of their own lives. See below for official definition.

The Medal of Honor is awarded by the President, in the name of Congress, to a Service member of the U.S. Army, U.S. Navy, U.S. Air Force, the U.S. Marine Corps and the U.S. Coast Guard, who distinguish themselves conspicuously by gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his or her life above and beyond the call of duty while engaged in action against an enemy of the United States; Go to link for complete requirements. www.uspharmd.com...

A monthly stipend is paid to living veterans who received the Medal of Honor. Effective December 1, 2007 the 2008 rate is set at $1,129 per month tax free. www.history.army.mil...

The website below lists 20 combats - wars - and 2 “other” categories in which the awards were made. 3,466 medals have been awarded as of April 10, 2008. I am surprised that “ONLY” 619 of the recipients died in the process. 19 men received 2 Medal of Honor awards. The Air Force received 4 medals in the Korean War and 13 in the Vietnam War. The Air Force was part of the Army in World War 2 and its awards are not broken out of the 324 medals awarded to the Army.

Here is a list of engagements during which the medal has been awarded.

Civil War 1861-1865
Indian War Campaigns1866-1870
1871 Korean Campaign
Second Indian Wars 1871-1898
War with Spain 1898-1899
Philippine Insurrection 1901-1903
China Boxer Rebellion 1900
Interim Period 1901-1911 (US Navy for heroic acts in dangerous events)
Action Against Philippine Outlaws 1911
Mexican Campaign (Vera Cruz) 1914-1915
Haiti 1915
Interim 1915-16 (US Navy for heroic acts onboard ships)
Dominican Campaign 1916
World War I 1917-1918
Haiti Campaign 1919-1920
Second Nicaraguan Campaign 1928-1932
Interim 1920-1940 (US Navy heroic acts including with Byrd expedition to the Arctic)
World War II 1941-1945
Korean War 1950-1953
Vietnam 1962-1974
Somalia 1993
Afghanistan 2001-ongoing. 1 MOH was awarded in 2005
Iraq 2003-Ongoing

The medal of honor was not awarded during the Revolutionary War, 1775-1783; The Barbary Coast War, 1804-1805; The War of 1812, 1812-1814; The Mexican War 1846-1847. It was first awarded in the American Civil War 1861-1865.
www.history.army.mil...

[edit on 5/25/2008 by donwhite]




posted on May, 25 2008 @ 07:53 PM
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Thanks for the post, Don! Star & flag for you. Very informative...you should create a TinWiki article about the Medal of Honor!


Only $1129 per month stipend as an award for displaying uncommon courage and valor, and for probably getting severely injured doing so?

Yet another reason for me to be ashamed of my government (but not my country!).



posted on May, 25 2008 @ 08:52 PM
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reply to post by ezziboo
 



Only $1129 per month stipend as an award for displaying uncommon courage and valor, and for probably getting severely injured doing so? Yet another reason for me to be ashamed of my government . . . but not my country . .


I'm glad to see someone else who knows the difference between the administration in office and our country. Thank you for the nice words!

Actually, that issue was debated in Congress. If you followed the links you will note the first stipend was $10 a month (1900) then it was raised from time to time but now it is under the provisions of COLA.

As you have suggested, some Members of Congress wanted more, others wanted less or none. The argument is over the issue of the inadequacy of any monetary reward and the issue whether we want to create an image of paying for bravery. Something we really expect from everyone of us. It was not penury that kept the dollar amount low but rather, the fear too much money would send the wrong message.

[edit on 5/25/2008 by donwhite]



posted on May, 25 2008 @ 10:54 PM
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In my time in the service I met only one MOH winner. Sgt. Pittman from Jackson, Ms. I served with his son at NATTC, Millington, Tn. in 1990 and used to drive down to his house in Jackson on weekends. He won the Medal for jumping on a grenade thrown by a Chinese Regular in Korea. He received the MOH from Pres. Truman. Also was on the cover of Life Mag.

Any way thanks for such a great thread. Starred and flagged.



posted on May, 25 2008 @ 10:58 PM
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Took a little research but I found it:




posted on May, 26 2008 @ 12:25 AM
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The stipend is equivalent to a 70% disability pension. A Medal of Honor recipient would also be eligible for retirement pay or disability payments according to various regulations.

The stipend for the award is significant when coupled with other payments for which a recipient might be eligible to receive.

Considering that lesser medals such as the Navy Cross and its service equivalents and the Silver Star, which are not handed out willy-nilly, receive nothing.

I sincerely doubt that any MOH recipient has ever complained about this benefit.



posted on May, 26 2008 @ 12:36 AM
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Originally posted by US Monitor
In my time in the service I met only one MOH winner.


The Major is perturbed.

No one has ever "won" the Medal of Honor, they are recipients.

Dismissed.



posted on May, 26 2008 @ 12:46 AM
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Well done, DW. Well done, indeed...

Only 619 died in the process of deserving to recieve the MOH? That surprised me, too. Then I realized that's nearly one fifth, that's actually quite a few.

Still and all, don...great thread. Thanks.



posted on May, 26 2008 @ 12:56 AM
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Originally posted by ezziboo
Thanks for the post, Don! Star & flag for you. Very informative...you should create a TinWiki article about the Medal of Honor!


Only $1129 per month stipend as an award for displaying uncommon courage and valor, and for probably getting severely injured doing so?

Yet another reason for me to be ashamed of my government (but not my country!).


Er, I'm not a Yank, so you can take this or leave it, but I think the important part you missed there was


Originally posted by donwhite
A monthly stipend is paid to living veterans who received the Medal of Honor. Effective December 1, 2007 the 2008 rate is set at $1,129 per month tax free.


So, a serviceperson can take up any post-service employment they want and will continue to receive a tax-free benefit on top of their salary OR, should they be incapacitated by their service, they receive a military pension ("Army Benefit", correct terminology, anyone?) plus veteran's medical PLUS their tax-free eleven hundfred a month.

Do the children of CMH-winners (deliberate use of terminology) still get a straight entry to West Point should they wish it?

edit: bold mine

[edit on 26-5-2008 by HowlrunnerIV]



posted on May, 26 2008 @ 01:05 PM
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posted by HowlrunnerIV
So, a serviceperson can take up any post-service employment they want and will continue to receive a tax-free benefit on top of their salary OR, should they be incapacitated by their service, they receive a military pension ("Army Benefit", correct terminology, anyone?) plus veteran's medical PLUS their tax-free eleven hundred a month. Do the children of CMH-winners (deliberate use of terminology) still get a straight entry to West Point should they wish it?


Yes, it’s in addition to. The MOH stipend - not a pension or retirement but a stipend. You did this, we’ll do that. The Army does not retain or pay disabled soldiers.

They are discharged. It then falls to the Veterans Administration to rate their disability and to make payments according to the amounts established by Congress and to furnish appropriate medical care.

All veterans are (theoretically) entitled to free health care, however due to the vast under-funding of the VA over many years, it has become necessary to categorize veterans so the “most deserving” get care first. The final category, just a vet who needs help, gets put on “space available” awaiting list.

The current VA budget is $34 b. The private DAV - Disabled American Veterans - says the budget ought to be $51 b. Recall it was the Washington Post that “discovered” the terrible conditions at Walter Reed Hospital - the No. 1 hospital for the Army - although the DAV had been urging a general overhaul and upgrade for a decade. Not then named for the Spanish American War Army medic Walter Reed, Abraham Lincoln visited the Army hospital almost daily after the War began. It helped him to keep his feet on the ground.

Do families or dependents of MOH recipients get anything? Not to my knowledge. Somewhere on the ‘net is a minimum pension benefit for dependents of deceased vets. But it is so small that SSI exceeds it. Aside: Security Supplemental Income - SSI is a Great Society program that tried to make welfare uniform throughout the country. (Nearly impossible to do here). To get SSI if under age 65, you must be totally disabled for work. Over 65, it is the base amount payable under SS if you are entitled to less based on a low earnings record.

[edit on 5/26/2008 by donwhite]



posted on May, 26 2008 @ 03:38 PM
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Originally posted by HowlrunnerIV
Do the children of CMH-winners (deliberate use of terminology) still get a straight entry to West Point should they wish it?


Since the CMH does not exists, then no.

However, children of Medal of Honor awardees gain automatic entrance into any service school provided they meet the physical requirements.



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