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Evidence of a parallel universe?

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posted on May, 25 2008 @ 12:00 AM
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You know, I know that there was a thread on this, and it just fizzled out. Maybe it didn't have the proper POP, or maybe it's because it came from some sort of paternity site. Either way, I'm re-launching this topic because it seems fairly important and it astounds me that it didn't get more attention.


IN AUGUST, radio astronomers announced that they had found an enormous hole in the universe... One team of physicists has a breathtaking explanation: "It is the unmistakable imprint of another universe beyond the edge of our own," says Laura Mersini-Houghton of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. “Standard cosmology cannot explain such a giant cosmic hole”


people.tribe.net...

But it's more than just the hole...

If the cosmic cold spot was all that Laura Mersini-Houghton and her colleagues had chalked up in the way of a prediction, it might be possible to dismiss it as a fluke. However, they claim they can explain two other anomalies in the WMAP measurements of the cosmic microwave background too.
The standard model of cosmology cannot explain why the hot and cold spots of the quadrupole and octupole are much closer in temperature than they are in other multipoles. But Mersini-Houghton says that the squeezing of our universe by neighbouring ones in her team's model leads to repulsive gravity and suppresses the quantum fluctuations that seeded matter. "This is turn depresses the temperature variations at the quadrupole scale, exactly as WMAP has seen," she says.

Also, the team has two other predictions that, if proven, would make an essentially rock solid case for us mere humans having actually observed the effects of a nearby universe.

They predict that there should be not one such giant void but two: one in the northern hemisphere corresponding to the WMAP cold spot and one in the southern hemisphere. "We are hoping that a southern void will turn up in the data soon," she says.

The other prediction is that the The Large Hadron Collider WILL NOT have the energy required to produce supersymmetric particles

They hope to test what happened when the universe cooled below a certain temperature and underwent a phase transition, which broke supersymmetry. According to string models, the energy released during the phase transition drove inflation, and went on to create supersymmetric particles. Since the energy had to be sufficient to ensure the growth of our piece of vacuum, Mersini-Houghton and her colleagues can make an estimate of the energy scale of supersymmetry breaking. "We find it is about 100,000 times greater than generally believed," she says. "Therefore we predict that the LHC will not detect supersymmetry."




posted on May, 25 2008 @ 12:14 AM
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I heard this might have been a mistake.

SOURCE

Now you see it, now you don't. A giant hole in the cosmos that shocked astrophysicists last year may not exist after all. A re-examination of the area has found that the "void", which supposedly contained far fewer stars and galaxies than expected, could be a statistical artefact.


Thought I should add this:
One thing is they only record galaxies in the void above a certain luminosity, meaning even if its there, if its too faint its not recorded as being their at all. I wish the rest of the article wasn't from a commercial magazine, means I cant link to the whole article. It explains in more detail. Oh and I must say although there is not a void, there is a cold spot.. still curious.

[edit on 25-5-2008 by CuriosityStrikes]



posted on May, 25 2008 @ 12:25 AM
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reply to post by CuriosityStrikes
 


Does this really surprise you?

I mean just when I was ready to point to that giant hole and claim that is where all my missing socks went, scientist lose the hole!

I guess it's back to the black hole theory for those socks.



posted on May, 25 2008 @ 12:34 AM
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reply to post by garyo1954
 

I don't quite understand how you mean, it doesn't surprise me in that if you look at what they class as a void is different to the common sense approach to a void. One thing is they only record galaxies in the void above a certain luminosity, meaning even if its there, if its too faint its not recorded as being their at all. I wish the rest of the article wasn't from a commercial magazine, means I cant link to the whole article. It explains in more detail.

Oh and I must say although there is not a void, there is a cold spot.. still curious.

(Decided to add this to my first reply also..)

[edit on 25-5-2008 by CuriosityStrikes]



posted on Jul, 28 2008 @ 11:51 AM
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Just found this thread, seems interesting.

It reminds of the His Dark Materials trilogy of books written by Philip Pullman. I've read the first, The Northern Lights (or in America, The Golden Compass) and now I'm up to the second one, The Subtle Knife. But part of the story is that there are different universes side to side. This thread just reminded me of that


Sorry if I give anything about the story away (you should probably stop reading if you don't want to know), in the story the main character's father makes a whole in our universe that is able to bridge to another universe. That's in the first book. In the second book, a boy discovers accidentally, a small rip in our universe near a round-about near a busy road, and he's able to come and go through it with ease.

I'm just wondering if this story has anything to do with what's written in the OP. Hmm...

Edit: spelling errors

[edit on 28/7/2008 by Sparkly_Eyed777]




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