ATS: Schools Using Biometric Tracking on Students

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posted on Mar, 1 2004 @ 10:33 AM
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A school district in Florida will begin biometric tracking of students by having them scan their thumbprint as the board and leave the bus. This system is tied to a global positioning so they will be able to track what students are where. Is this policy being protective or is it teaching our children to accept government tracking as a way of life?
 

St Petersburg Times
The Pinellas school system is ready to approve a new technology that uses student fingerprints to keep track of who is riding school buses. If the School Board approves the proposal March 9, Pinellas will become one of four Florida school districts in the process of implementing Global Positioning Systems with a student-tracking system. Under the Pinellas plan, the district's nearly 700 buses will be equipped with GPS transponders, student identification devices and communications equipment and software.

The school’s ability to track the students on this level opens up a whole array of questions. When this is hailed as a great success, will they also track students entering each class? Since this data will be saved in a database, it will be possible for the government to pull this data up with ease. These students may find that in a job interview 20 years from now, an employer will say, “I see here that you missed a lot of school in the 5th grade.” Or, “Why did you skip your math class every other Thursday?”
Barry Steinhardt, director of the American Civil Liberties Union's Program on Technology and Liberty, is quoted saying “We are conditioning these children to understand that they have no personal space, no personal privacy.” Nancy McKibben, mother of three teenagers at Palm Harbor University High School and president of the school's PTSA said, "This is probably a really good idea, but in my mind it was just this terrible feeling, like they're watching my kids wherever they go." Others see this a necessary to ensuring the safety of the children, saying that parents want to know that their children are getting to school safely.


[Edited on 1-3-2004 by SkepticOverlord]




posted on Mar, 1 2004 @ 06:49 PM
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Maybe it's just me having gone to school in the country, where houses were spread out, thus bus stops were, as well, but only so many kids can fit on a bus. My bus drivers in my youth always recognized who was supposed to be on the bus, and wouldn't allow anyone else on unless they had a note. In highschool it wasn't like that, but at that time, it's not as big of an issue.

My daughter is in kindergarten right now, and she has to switch buses to go to a different school because of overflow problems, but each morning, and each afternoon, there is someone there to escort her and the others to the other bus.

I just really don't see the need for this, at all, whether it be for younger children, or older children.


School bus safety has been getting more attention since a January 2002 bus hijacking in Pennsylvania. A Berks County school bus carrying 13 students was overtaken by a man with a rifle, and found in Maryland six hours later when the hijacker turned himself into police.


To clarify this... the person who hijakcked the bus was the usual driver of the bus. Overtaken? hah. Now tell me how the hell scanners are going to prevent that?




BUS HIJACKING STORY



posted on Mar, 1 2004 @ 11:24 PM
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As a student myself a fully support this. The school traspostation systems in many schools has lagged behind in adapting to the future and it is time that they steped up.



posted on Mar, 2 2004 @ 08:50 AM
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i really don't see a need for this as well, and i do feel it's conditioning kids to get used to being tracked on a daily basis. it's kinda scary to think ahead 20 years and wonder what new devices they're be using to track the rest of us...for our own safety of course!



posted on Mar, 2 2004 @ 08:58 AM
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Originally posted by enomus
i really don't see a need for this as well, and i do feel it's conditioning kids to get used to being tracked on a daily basis. it's kinda scary to think ahead 20 years and wonder what new devices they're be using to track the rest of us...for our own safety of course!


As long as it is used for what it is for, then I would be for it. Just like the cams in school buses, had it not been for one of those cams, a student would have gotten away with beating the crap out of another much younger kid



posted on Mar, 5 2004 @ 10:31 PM
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Personally, I don't see how this can hurt anyone. There is no harm in using safe, effective methods to keep track of students, in the effort to keep them safe and secure. If there is an effective method of preventing a problem before it happens, all the better.



“We are conditioning these children to understand that they have no personal space, no personal privacy.”


To the best of my knowledge, being a student myself, teacher's/personnel keeping track of bussing and classes do take attendance and still monitor whether or not students are present. They still know the number of classes you skipped or were absent/late from. So basically, the school still knows when your in class or not, not really changing the amount of privacy you would have under this sort of system.

If students are worried that possible employers are going to bring up their attendance records, perhaps it will promote better habits among youth. There isn't any harm in having students that are more convinced to attend their classes. It would also seem very strange if you're refused a job because you were absent a lot in the 5th grade. Personally, I don't see how being absent in the 5th grade a lot could affect how you would act taking on a job as an adult.

If this is only used for school than I don't see the harm in monitoring students, it just helps to ensure that they are safe, knowing that the school can find them easily should something go wrong.





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