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Boeing fires high-energy chemical laser

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posted on May, 19 2008 @ 08:15 PM
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Boeing fires high-energy chemical laser


news.moneycentral.msn.com

The Boeing Co. fired a high-energy chemical laser aboard a C-130H aircraft in ground tests for the first time May 13 at Kirtland Air Force Base in Albuquerque, N.M.

Boeing is developing the Advanced Tactical Laser for the Department of Defense to destroy, damage or disable targets with little or no collateral damage. The laser will be used to support missions on the battlefield and in urban operations.

(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on May, 19 2008 @ 08:15 PM
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Wow, this sounds cool. Hasn't the technology been available a while, though? As in, not new?

And... Really, I thought they just made planes.

news.moneycentral.msn.com
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on May, 19 2008 @ 08:22 PM
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A few questions.

What do they mean by "collateral damage"? Does that mean the target is obliterated? And the surrounding areas are safe from debris?

If so, how does this fit with 9/11 and flight 93?

Or am I off my rocker?

Edit: Oh BTW, wasn't it also a C-130H that was tailing the pentagon flight and flight 93?

[edit on 5/19/2008 by Griff]



posted on May, 19 2008 @ 08:38 PM
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I do wonder if "reduced collateral damage" just means less likely of HITTING something not targeted. I cannot even start to imagine that the whole thing is disintegrated in the air.

C-130H, a prop driven aircraft. I don't think this fits 9-11 and Flight 93 at all... And really, I dont believe that a could keep up with a 757 or 767.
Even with 4 turbo prop engines, the C-130 could not keep up.

"Max cruising speed 914km/h (493kt), economical cruising speed 850km/h (460kt).

C-130H: 366 mph/318 ktas (Mach 0.52) at 20,000 feet " www.airliners.net...

I could be very wrong.
I know nothing of this stuff.



posted on May, 19 2008 @ 08:46 PM
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I was just watching Star Wars tech on discovery or history and apparently if you have hot plasma but like a bazillion degrees would do the trick. but also cold plasma as well but they did not elaborate on that.



posted on May, 19 2008 @ 08:46 PM
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One would think they have had this tec for many years and now are starting to bring out the toys and say look what we have just come up with


I think in the next few years we will see more and more tec come out to the public eye and every one will go wow !! But they have just had it on the shelf for many years IMO



posted on May, 19 2008 @ 09:28 PM
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reply to post by LostNemesis
 

I do wonder if "reduced collateral damage" just means less likely of HITTING something not targeted. I cannot even start to imagine that the whole thing is disintegrated in the air.



How hot is the beam? The laser itself isn’t hot, but it can heat its target to thousands of degrees.
Does the laser sear everything in its path? Yes. If a bird flew into the firing laser’s line of sight— well, no more bird. Fortunately, the weapon will fire for only a few seconds at a time, minimizing the risk.
Does it melt its target or just set it aflame? That depends on what it hits. It will melt metal, but if the target is combustible, it will burn. Source


They're going to start using it in the AC-130 which would be a lot more accurate than the 105mm cannon that that platform uses now. Plus, no exploding shells that send metal fragments everywhere when they impact.



posted on May, 19 2008 @ 09:45 PM
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Boeing has had this technology has beeen around for about 10 years and it has been used before but not in warfare to my knowlodge so far.

It has only come know to the public now as before they couldn't get to work correctly as it wouldn't stay still when firing so it couldn't get the target they were pointing at.

This information was given to me via a work mate who has served in the Australian armed forces and has seen this attached to a C-130 when it was first tested.



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