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Net video lands US man in prison

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posted on May, 16 2008 @ 04:16 AM
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Net video lands US man in prison


news.bbc.co.uk

Rudy Villanueva, 31, last year filmed himself waving guns in the air, inviting police to "come get some".
Police took Villanueva up on the offer in January, seizing several weapons and hundreds of rounds of ammunition from the flat where the video was made.
He later pleaded guilty to firearms charges, but said he had meant no harm.
Villanueva argued that the video, posted on video-sharing website YouTube, was a misunderstanding.
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on May, 16 2008 @ 04:16 AM
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I am actually very interested to see some of the facts for this when the U.S. press inevitably picks this up. I fail to see what someone does legally in the privacy of their own home, and then is voluntarily watched by the public, can be construed as a crime or reason for a warrant. Unless it proves they knew his guns illegal. What about violent rap videos? or films that are anti police. Or raving about your GTA skills online?

news.bbc.co.uk
(visit the link for the full news article)

Edit to go on a rant.

[edit on 16-5-2008 by jasonjnelson]



posted on May, 16 2008 @ 04:59 AM
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I doubt you're going to see any more facts for the MSM. He has 15 prior convictions which is the kind of candidate just ripe for the business the courts, cops & prisons. More than likely the firearms violations are because he's an ex-con and just having a weapon is a crime. Pretty stupid move on his part, allowing the system to get him again for practically nothing.

[edit on 16-5-2008 by verylowfrequency]



posted on May, 16 2008 @ 05:02 AM
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reply to post by verylowfrequency
 


I agree with the idiotic behavior of the man in question, as I read more of his rap sheet myself. However, I do find the idea that this kind of move can be made by law enforcement. What if the man had only replica weapons? What if, in fact, the warrant was issued and nothing found? What kind of precedent does this set?



posted on May, 16 2008 @ 05:04 AM
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reply to post by jasonjnelson
 


He was inviting the police to come round to his house.

They did.

They might have thought they were going to get a beer as well, and of course arresting people is what police do.

A "Misunderstanding"?

The only misunderstanding is that he thought he was clever when he bigged himself up against a perceived police state - the fact that he didn't respond to the police with his "some" makes him nothing more than a fraud who attempted to curry favour with certain radical elements of society.

In otherwords, he's a douche.



posted on May, 16 2008 @ 05:18 AM
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reply to post by Anti-Tyrant
 


Once again, there is no argument that this man is an idiot. I am however, questioning the method by which our police are monitoring us.



posted on May, 16 2008 @ 05:23 AM
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reply to post by jasonjnelson
 


Most likely, it was some "Good Citizen" who saw the video and tipped off the cops.

Another possibility is that the fellow made an enemy of someone, and that someone was just waiting for him to slip up.

Or yeah, it could just be that the cops have some sort of "Internet division" which monitors the internet for signs of potential criminal activity.

What's important to remember however, is that all of the above are possibilities.

We can continue speculating, if you want.




posted on May, 16 2008 @ 05:26 AM
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reply to post by Anti-Tyrant
 


I think that we are having two separate conversations. I am talking about the fact that you can post a youtube video, a short film about whatever, and if it were to be a fake event staged as real, here come the cops. Then we start once again down the slippery slope of thought policing... I am not speculating how they got this idiot, I'm asking where the line in the sand is. And don't say that it is obvious...



posted on May, 16 2008 @ 05:31 AM
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reply to post by jasonjnelson
 


Why would i say that it is obvious?

I'm not even certain there's a line in the sand to find.

What i find even more disturbing is that the police seem to be keeping tabs on people for the purpose of monitering their activities - they did it with the GPS tags and now it seems they've qualified to social activities too.

Kinda like zero tolerance for extremism, if you get my meaning.



posted on May, 16 2008 @ 05:41 AM
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reply to post by Anti-Tyrant
 


Well exactly. I think that we should be worried about this new internet bill, the one that bans "subversive" groups. What the hell is a "subversive" group? Who gets to decide that one? What if the Ron Paul campaign was declared a "subversive" element?



posted on May, 16 2008 @ 10:12 AM
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reply to post by jasonjnelson
 


I don't see what the issue is here. They merely need to have a reasonable suspicion that a crime is in progress. When this idiot waved a gun around in a video for the world to see, he gave them that reasonable suspicion.

IMO, it doesn't really matter how they acquired the evidence, because the criminal in this case is the one that put the evidence into a public forum. He was quite literally just asking for it.

Had the gun been a fake, the police would've had no case on that count. They might still have been able to prosecute him for the threat, however.



posted on May, 16 2008 @ 10:55 AM
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Here's just a little more about this man and his troubles with the law.

I'm not sure why the BBC is covering this story and I'm not sure why they decided not to provide more facts about the case.

From what they've written, it would seem that some aspiring movie director/producer/actor made a little video which he posted to YouTube that offended the mean old police who arrested this ambitious, law-abiding young man who was just exercising his First Amendment rights.

The case is just a bit more complex than that.


Rudy Villanueva, 31, had pleaded guilty in February to being a convicted felon in possession of a firearm.

A multiagency task force arrested Villanueva -- the leader of the Bird Road Boys gang -- and Anthony Logan, 22, in January, days after The Miami Herald reported on several YouTube videos featuring the men.

In one video, Villanueva and Logan pointed assault rifles and handguns at the camera in a message directed at Miami-Dade's gang unit -- taunting police to ``come get some.''

www.miamiherald.com...



''We were offended, obviously,'' said Lt. Israel McKee, head of the gang unit. "They were threatening our lives. I didn't take kindly to that.''

...South Florida's law enforcement community, which has seen four officers killed in the past six months, didn't take the video lightly.

www.policeone.com...


Google Search


[edit on 2008/5/16 by GradyPhilpott]



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