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These Boots were made for walking - Boots Guide

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posted on May, 15 2008 @ 07:44 PM
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Military Gurus! Some (or maybe all?) of this is suck eggs

It's also a bit UK orientated kitwise.

Lets face it, in a brave new world where cars and the like are scarce those of us that are on the move will be doing a hell of a lot of walking about.

Trainers are cool for the street, you can run fast and they can, in a pinch do the long distance thing.
Trouble is they are useless in wet-weather, on rough terrain/hills/mountains you've typically got minimal foot and ankle protection and carrying weight wearing them is risking a twisted ankle/blisters.

A good pair of army boots will do nearly everything trainers can't. They are cheap, do the job, and with a good lick of polish will keep out the water. Brush off the excess for to be shiny and look good or keep the polish thick to waterproof it and give off no shine. With gaitors and gortex socks you can reap the benefits while slogging though unpleasant and miserable weather conditions.

The standard issue Brit Army ones from 1983ish to 1994ish was BCH or Boots Combat High.



These are a pretty decent boot but the heel is hard edged - Good for parade noises but can damage the knee when running on hard surfaces as it takes the shock more than the heel area. It's not as comfy IMO either as others.
You can grab these boots cheap on fleabay.
The American Army Jungle Warfare Boot (not sure of years) is a good boot too. I knew a few guys who owned them and heard pretty good things.
Lightweight and good for hotter climates.

1995 onwards is the Boots Combat Assault of BCA. These are what I wear and to honest I've yet to wear better. They are neither too light or too heavy, running isn't difficult and some come with steel toecaps fitted. They have the heel issue fixed when it comes to hard impact injurys on the knees and shin splints. Yes I will rave about these as they are the real deal.
Plenty of surplus store on Fleabay etc stock these and they are a bit dearer than BCH but still cheap.



Always good to check the tread on boots, especially if you are buying 2nd hand. If they're cracked or split walk away. For survival you want something that'll last you a while.
A good pair of boots will last a long time if used in the country. In urban areas on hard surfaces they will wear a bit faster.

Some wear is ok, mine that are about 1/4 worn out in the tread. They are worn-in though and that is the first rule of thumb when it comes to preventing blisters.

Setting the pace.

What pace should you set is up to yourself and the dangers faced.
Assuming everything looks ok and theres no nearby danger then a fastish pace that means you're out of a city or town by nightfall is the best bet.
Personally I'd be wanting to reach that cache, strongpoint or RV point with your friends, wherever that might be.
If say the place is about 50 miles then you're looking at getting their as soon as possible. Your rations will be diminishing the longer you tarry so...
A good rule of thumb would be 15 minutes for every mile you'd pass. Not too hard but carrying a Bail-Out Bag and possibly a shoulder slung weapon while negotiating your way out of a city or town into the boonies makes things a little interesting.


Ignoring the TA soldier catching up with his mates. These guys are going at about 10-12 minutes for every mile, jog-running will drop this down a bit.

If you've got a backpack you'll move faster than someone who is carrying a duffle bag by hand. It's that simple as both your arms can be used for generating forward momentum via a pendulum action side to side. Also the weight will be distributed evenly too.
You'll want to be leaning forwards to offset the weight on your back.

Thats it for this part.




posted on May, 15 2008 @ 08:01 PM
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good post, combat boots are a must if things escalate.
What about the old Dr martins?
surely there good for something....

[edit on 15-5-2008 by Dar Kuma]



posted on May, 15 2008 @ 08:46 PM
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Docs are ok, but I've never worn them, so for long distance work they might be lacking.
I'd imagine they're good for urban type stuff.

You want a boot that isn't too rigid and over-strong as Docs always appear too OTT. But thats just me.

I bought a really tough set of work boots (I still have them!) they were too strong and heavy!

They weighed twice what my BCA weighed, had steel all over them! In the toes ok cool, in the heels! In the sole!
I tried breaking them in but they were a big pain to walk any distance in them. 3 miles and your feet would ache and cry out to be released.
I think they would be perfect for a knight wanting replacement foot armour!
Too good for me though.

I forget the brandname (I'll check tomorrow).



posted on May, 15 2008 @ 09:10 PM
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Originally posted by WatchRider
Docs are ok, but I've never worn them, so for long distance work they might be lacking. I'd imagine they're good for urban type stuff.

You want a boot that isn't too rigid and over-strong as Docs always appear too OTT. But thats just me.


Doc Martens...I can't think of a better all-rounder, I wear 'em all the time as me day-to-day footwear and once you've gotten them broken-in are as good as any boot for long-distance foot-slogging.

They're light enough for running in, the sole has enough flexibility and softness to enable silent walking, and offer enough ankle support to prevent sprains

The only problem with them is the direct-moulded sole which means the boot has to be replaced once it wears out, but you'll have to have been walking for a couple of years in 'em to get to that point...I've had mine since last August as a daily workwear and the treads are still fine and hardly worn

[edit on 15-5-2008 by citizen smith]



posted on May, 16 2008 @ 10:26 AM
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I've had a pair of hiking boots since my boyscout days. They've taken me through the Appalacians, the Wind River Range, the Tetons and Alaska. Obviously not the same pair, in all I've probably had 20 different boots over the years. I'm on my second pair of Vasque hiking boots right now. Luckily I purchased them when they were still made in Italy and not China. Awesome boots. As far as Doc's are concerened I've had three pair over the years and are by far my favorite every day walkers and once the're broken in ya can't beat em. Haven't tried their boots yet but I plan to be in G.B. next month so maybe I'll look into a pair. Imo, the two most important attributes in a boot are Gore-Tex, and support. The military boots posted don't have either as far as I know. Raichle makes a decent boot as well. The OP is correct you have to protect those feet when the shtf.

Good luck to you all.

The Undertaker



posted on May, 16 2008 @ 11:39 AM
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For me a cheap army boot like the BCA (costs about £20 - £25) does everything a more expensive one does. You just gotta make sure it fits well, make a few mods like a comfy inner sole and gaffer tape the stitching.
Then, with a tin of polish and waterproof socks you're on the par with the wonder boots.
I'm not knocking your choice in boot though.
I agree they are a good buy and tend to be lighter, but normal army boots that are churned out by the dozen dance to their tune as well for less coin.
You just gotta mess around until you get it all comfy.
But don't listen to me too much as the armies probably got me all biased


[edit on 16-5-2008 by WatchRider]



posted on May, 16 2008 @ 11:47 AM
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*cough*

Tracking 101;

What kind of boots is the prey wearing?



posted on May, 16 2008 @ 02:12 PM
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?????

Sorry wrong thread mate, this is just about boots not tracking someone.



posted on May, 16 2008 @ 04:52 PM
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Originally posted by Anti-Tyrant
*cough*

Tracking 101;

What kind of boots is the prey wearing?


Actually, that's a damn good point!

I've read of strips of vehicle tyre being used to resole boots...perhaps this method would enable someone to throw a tracker of their trail if they were using that method of boot-print-tracking?



posted on May, 16 2008 @ 10:15 PM
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Walking a mile every 10-12 minutes with a pack on is ridiculous. Let's see you keep that pace for anytime let alone do it at all. That's a light jog actually. And even a 15 minute mile is a pretty brisk pace.



posted on May, 16 2008 @ 11:10 PM
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Actually, that's a damn good point!

I've read of strips of vehicle tyre being used to resole boots...perhaps this method would enable someone to throw a tracker of their trail if they were using that method of boot-print-tracking?


Thats propably not going to work unless you dont plan on picking up your feet when you walk.
And if you walk like that your not going to go that fast.



posted on May, 16 2008 @ 11:25 PM
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What's your opinion on spring steel in the sole?

On the up-side, it cushions the step a bit, which reduces fatigue, and it will protect better that just rubber against sharp pointy things you may accidentally step on. Injuring your feet in a survival situation is something to be avoided at all costs.

On the down-side, it's a bit of added weight (not much, but every ounce counts when you have to carry your life on your shoulders). Many serious hikers will go to great lengths to trim an ounce here and an ounce there, to go faster, longer, and conserve energy.

What are your thoughts on this?



posted on May, 17 2008 @ 12:01 AM
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I have a pair of Magnum tactical combat hikers (side zip type). They are the most comfortable boots Ive ever owned and worn. I did security for 2 yrs and have chased many intruders. The boots are very light and extremely durable.



posted on May, 17 2008 @ 12:51 AM
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Always a good topic.
Here are some discussions we had last year about footwear.

boots

another follow up

enjoy



posted on May, 17 2008 @ 05:32 AM
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Originally posted by WyrdeOne
What's your opinion on spring steel in the sole?

On the up-side, it cushions the step a bit, which reduces fatigue, and it will protect better that just rubber against sharp pointy things you may accidentally step on. Injuring your feet in a survival situation is something to be avoided at all costs.

On the down-side, it's a bit of added weight (not much, but every ounce counts when you have to carry your life on your shoulders). Many serious hikers will go to great lengths to trim an ounce here and an ounce there, to go faster, longer, and conserve energy.

What are your thoughts on this?



To be honest I've never factored in the sprung steel into boots.
Going off the CBA and CBH I found them pretty decent boots even though they haven't got sprung steel in the sole.
But I wouldn't be against the concept of wearing boots with them in.



posted on May, 17 2008 @ 07:20 AM
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Watchrider mate you seem pretty knowledgeable about boots in general. (Ex forces perhaps?).

What boot was standard issue for the SAS around the 2000 mark? Ive got a full set of DPM soldier 95 with those boots (for OTC), but I dont know what the boots are called.

Theyre heavy and can handle anything you throw at them, but do tend to make mincemeat of my feet after a day's worth of combat exercises.



posted on May, 17 2008 @ 07:50 AM
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The best pair of boots I've ever worn are my Rocky 10" Paratrooper side-zip boots. They're lightweight, tough, and as comfortable as a pair of tennis shoes. I bought them about 2 or so years ago and they still look and feel great, plus the tread lasts a really long time. Rocky also makes a boot just like them but with a waterproof inner lining. Rocky Paratrooper Boots . Great for long walks in the country or chasing criminals through the woods
.



posted on May, 17 2008 @ 09:28 AM
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Originally posted by jjstile
Walking a mile every 10-12 minutes with a pack on is ridiculous. Let's see you keep that pace for anytime let alone do it at all. That's a light jog actually. And even a 15 minute mile is a pretty brisk pace.


I never said WALKING a mile in 10-12 minutes! Read my post properly mate before you jump on me.

You could speed march at that pace!
I have done it mate, got the T shirt, the medal and the blisters to prove it.
Even got a medal for doing a marathon with a pack, boots etc in under eight hours, all on tarmac and ashalt roads in Switzerland. Called the Berner Distance March. Only supposed to do a fraction of a marathon but the OC figured us being Brit Army should set and example for the other Europeans to see, and see they did.
It's not a light jog, its a fast march. Someone fast marching is going about the same, or slightly faster than a light jog.

Its called Tabbing, or Tactical Advance to Batle. Not a natural thing for the human body to do but it can if you have the level of fitness.

You're right, it is ridiculous for a civilian to comprehend, but if you train yourself and keep fit the ridiculous becomes the possible and achievable.

This is what you have to do in the forces, if you can't do it you get downgraded and your career suffers, can't deploy overseas etc etc.
In the Falklands war the Paras and Commandos had to do it cause they lost the Chinooks on board the Atlantic Conveyer.

Back in the forces humping 20 kilos plus a weapon etc is a reality and once you have a good pace with a few of you together you'd be suprised how far you can go. SF guys have to do it, some normal soldiers can do it, so can civilians, it just takes time, effort and dedication.
Be cool and mind those blisters


[edit on 17-5-2008 by WatchRider]

[edit on 17-5-2008 by WatchRider]



posted on May, 17 2008 @ 09:38 AM
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Originally posted by 44soulslayer
Watchrider mate you seem pretty knowledgeable about boots in general. (Ex forces perhaps?).

What boot was standard issue for the SAS around the 2000 mark? Ive got a full set of DPM soldier 95 with those boots (for OTC), but I dont know what the boots are called.

Theyre heavy and can handle anything you throw at them, but do tend to make mincemeat of my feet after a day's worth of combat exercises.


Yo dude, yeah I'm ex-forces, some folk probably figure me to be a keyboard warrior but thats just the way it goes on here


I never served SF, but was in the forces then.

At a good guess I'd say they would have the liberty to wear whatever was good for them. Guys going on P Company and Commando courses often would recommend Britton boots.

Britton boots are slightly lighter than BCA, in fact they look identical but weigh less. They are not cheap either. About £75 a pair.

For just routine camp sht like regimental duties some guys would wear Hi Tec Magnums. These were comfy but some would say they weren't good for CFTs/Pack runs etc.
I never wore a pair so can't really speak on their rugged qualities really.

I think some UK and US police like to use these.

[edit on 17-5-2008 by WatchRider]



posted on May, 17 2008 @ 09:52 AM
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I got a pair of Alt-Berg Fremingtons for my girly-wussy blister-feet.

Made in Yorkshurrrr..harrr.

They're light,comfy and a decent bit of ankle support.
Waxed to hecky thump too.



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