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IF Obama "goes down" does Bush go back into power?

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posted on May, 11 2008 @ 01:21 PM
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i have read a few theories of Obama being taken out when he becomes president so the NWO can do w/e in w/e way i am sure you have all ready something like that by now

is there laws, or new bills passed or anything like that, that would give Bush power back if something happened to the new president(Obama, Clinton, Ron Paul
)?

would Bush just resume doing what he did until they could have another election?


[edit on 11-5-2008 by OSSkyWatcher]




posted on May, 11 2008 @ 01:22 PM
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As far as I know, the VP takes position if anything happens to the Pres.
Obama isn't a shoe-in for office, so he may never be elected.. but if he is, rest assured it was supposed to happen that way.



posted on May, 11 2008 @ 01:35 PM
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reply to post by OSSkyWatcher
 


hmm, 10 seconds on a google search answers this silly question.

The VP takes over of coarse and if the VP is killed at the same time, then the progression is as follows : (this is also why you won't find all of these folks together at the same time)

Speaker of the House of Representatives Nancy Pelosi
President Pro Tempore of the Senate Robert Byrd
Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice
Secretary of the Treasury Henry Paulson
Secretary of Defense Robert Gates
Attorney General Michael Mukasey
Secretary of the Interior Dirk Kempthorne
Secretary of Agriculture Charles Conner
Secretary of Commerce Carlos Gutierrez
Secretary of Labor Elaine Chao
Secretary of HHS Michael Leavitt
Secretary HUD Alphonso Jackson
Secretary of Transportation Mary Peters
Secretary of Energy Samuel Bodman
Secretary of Education Margaret Spellings
Secretary of Veterans Affairs Gordon Mansfield
Secretary of Homeland Security Michael Chertoff



posted on May, 11 2008 @ 02:13 PM
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10 seconds on google won't answer if there has been any laws/bills/w/e passed that would put bush back into power, which was part of my question(really, do i just type in "if the new president dies has there been any laws passed giving the old president power"....it's not going to work out too well on google or most search engines) you answered what happens if the current president dies, but not if congress passed w/e to give bush emergency temporary power if w/e happens in w/e specific situation, there are many variables that would go into a situation where there might be a law giving bush some kind of power back if something happened to the new president for a temporary amount of time until things can be sorted

but there are posters here (there are a few i know of, and many more) who are into all of the law making and bill passing topics who might have seen something about this or maybe something related to it, which is why i asked here and not google

i dunno if those posters will see this in skunk works though but...what can you do
i have no theory of a conspiracy just a few questions about "what if" and what laws may have been passed (i have been looking over some since 9/11)



posted on May, 11 2008 @ 02:27 PM
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Doesn't the President elect OFFICIALLY become President Jan. 20th? I am not totally clear as to who would be President should a President elect die before attaining office. I'll have to read up on it.

Here we go:


Section 3 of the 20th Amendment:
Section 3. If, at the time fixed for the beginning of the term of the President, the President elect shall have died, the Vice President elect shall become President. If a President shall not have been chosen before the time fixed for the beginning of his term, or if the President elect shall have failed to qualify, then the Vice President elect shall act as President until a President shall have qualified; and the Congress may by law provide for the case wherein neither a President elect nor a Vice President elect shall have qualified, declaring who shall then act as President, or the manner in which one who is to act shall be selected, and such person shall act accordingly until a President or Vice President shall have qualified.




posted on May, 11 2008 @ 02:41 PM
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reply to post by OSSkyWatcher
 


Considering it was a law passed by congress way back in the 1930s-1940s about an individual can only serve 8 years in the white house, and the fact that bush has served his 8, and laws are in place to assign new presidents should any be assassinated, I really don't think you need to worry yourself with Bush getting back into office. The same question could've arose with Bill Clinton, but of course it didn't, that I know of.



posted on May, 11 2008 @ 03:33 PM
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What if President Bush was held hostage before Jan. 20th 2009??? You know something like that can happen...what if?



posted on May, 11 2008 @ 04:13 PM
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reply to post by adkchamp
 



On Jan 20th, the President elected by the Electoral College on December 20th the previous month, will take office, regardless of the sitution of the previous President.

The Real question is what happens if the Winner of the Presidential Election dies before the Electoral College vote on Dec. 20th? The Vice President on the Winning ticket is not assured the Presidency should the Electoral College vote for someone else. They could vote for someone else at that point hypothetically.


[edit on 11-5-2008 by pavil]

[edit on 11-5-2008 by pavil]



posted on May, 11 2008 @ 04:59 PM
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Originally posted by pavil
reply to post by adkchamp
 

The Real question is what happens if the Winner of the Presidential Election dies before the Electoral College vote on Dec. 20th? The Vice President on the Winning ticket is not assured the Presidency should the Electoral College vote for someone else. They could vote for someone else at that point hypothetically.



The Vice President Elect would become President Elect and someone else (I think Nancy Pelosi?) would become Vice-President Elect. I'm not sure what you mean about the electoral college voting again after the general election though.



posted on May, 11 2008 @ 05:06 PM
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Originally posted by adkchamp
What if President Bush was held hostage before Jan. 20th 2009??? You know something like that can happen...what if?


The transfer of power from the President to the Vice President is not contingent on the death of the President, but on the President's inability to conduct the affairs of his office. If President Bush were taken hostage (and therefore unable to perform his official duties), Vice President Cheney would assume the office until President Bush was returned to office, or until Jan 20, 2009, when a new administration would be sworn in in any event. This particular aspect of Presidential Succession has actually been tested several times during recent administrations (when Reagan was being operated on after being shot, and on at least two occasions when President Bush was having medical procedures performed that required the use of general anaesthesia), so while the exact circumstance you're positing is unique, the precedent to deal with it is already established.



posted on May, 11 2008 @ 05:16 PM
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Originally posted by beaverg

Originally posted by pavil
reply to post by adkchamp
 

The Real question is what happens if the Winner of the Presidential Election dies before the Electoral College vote on Dec. 20th? The Vice President on the Winning ticket is not assured the Presidency should the Electoral College vote for someone else. They could vote for someone else at that point hypothetically.

Article II, Section I:



The Vice President Elect would become President Elect and someone else (I think Nancy Pelosi?) would become Vice-President Elect. I'm not sure what you mean about the electoral college voting again after the general election though.


He's referring to the fact that the people don't (and never have) voted directly for the President.


Section 1. The executive power shall be vested in a President of the United States of America. He shall hold his office during the term of four years, and, together with the Vice President, chosen for the same term, be elected, as follows:Each state shall appoint, in such manner as the Legislature thereof may direct, a number of electors, equal to the whole number of Senators and Representatives to which the State may be entitled in the Congress: but no Senator or Representative, or person holding an office of trust or profit under the United States, shall be appointed an elector.The electors shall meet in their respective states, and vote by ballot for two persons, of whom one at least shall not be an inhabitant of the same state with themselves. And they shall make a list of all the persons voted for, and of the number of votes for each; which list they shall sign and certify, and transmit sealed to the seat of the government of the United States, directed to the President of the Senate. The President of the Senate shall, in the presence of the Senate and House of Representatives, open all the certificates, and the votes shall then be counted. The person having the greatest number of votes shall be the President, if such number be a majority of the whole number of electors appointed; and if there be more than one who have such majority, and have an equal number of votes, then the House of Representatives shall immediately choose by ballot one of them for President; and if no person have a majority, then from the five highest on the list the said House shall in like manner choose the President. But in choosing the President, the votes shall be taken by States, the representation from each state having one vote; A quorum for this purpose shall consist of a member or members from two thirds of the states, and a majority of all the states shall be necessary to a choice. In every case, after the choice of the President, the person having the greatest number of votes of the electors shall be the Vice President. But if there should remain two or more who have equal votes, the Senate shall choose from them by ballot the Vice President.


This was later modified by the 12th Amendment:


Amendment XIIThe electors shall meet in their respective states and vote by ballot for President and Vice-President, one of whom, at least, shall not be an inhabitant of the same state with themselves; they shall name in their ballots the person voted for as President, and in distinct ballots the person voted for as Vice-President, and they shall make distinct lists of all persons voted for as President, and of all persons voted for as Vice-President, and of the number of votes for each, which lists they shall sign and certify, and transmit sealed to the seat of the government of the United States, directed to the President of the Senate;--The President of the Senate shall, in the presence of the Senate and House of Representatives, open all the certificates and the votes shall then be counted;--the person having the greatest number of votes for President, shall be the President, if such number be a majority of the whole number of electors appointed; and if no person have such majority, then from the persons having the highest numbers not exceeding three on the list of those voted for as President, the House of Representatives shall choose immediately, by ballot, the President. But in choosing the President, the votes shall be taken by states, the representation from each state having one vote; a quorum for this purpose shall consist of a member or members from two-thirds of the states, and a majority of all the states shall be necessary to a choice. And if the House of Representatives shall not choose a President whenever the right of choice shall devolve upon them, before the fourth day of March next following, then the Vice-President shall act as President, as in the case of the death or other constitutional disability of the President. The person having the greatest number of votes as Vice-President, shall be the Vice-President, if such number be a majority of the whole number of electors appointed, and if no person have a majority, then from the two highest numbers on the list, the Senate shall choose the Vice-President; a quorum for the purpose shall consist of two-thirds of the whole number of Senators, and a majority of the whole number shall be necessary to a choice. But no person constitutionally ineligible to the office of President shall be eligible to that of Vice-President of the United States.


External text quoted from here:
The Constitution online, in hypertext

In short, until the Electoral College elects a President, the election isn't 'won' or 'lost' by either candidate. While it's theoretically possible for the College to revolt and elect whomever they please, as a practical matter, any delegate doing so should be prepared to face extraordinary scrutiny. It's never happened, and it's not likely to happen this time either.



posted on May, 11 2008 @ 05:27 PM
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It really doesn't matter who gets elected, nothing will change. The dems got control of the house and what has changed? nothing.

There's nothing different between Bush or Obama, they are both just puppets for whoever is pulling the strings.

Allthough if Mccain gets elected it would pretty much be Bush, they are one in the same.



posted on May, 11 2008 @ 05:37 PM
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reply to post by Brother Stormhammer
 


Quite Accurate.

Take this Scenario though. I use it only because of the threads that have been posted here. Obama wins the election, but dies prior to the Dec 20th Electoral College. His running mate is John Edwards. Hilliary starts to claim "Hey, I finished second by a very close margin in the Democratic Primary, I should be the next Presidential Choice". Talk about fireworks blowing up!!!!!



posted on May, 11 2008 @ 06:03 PM
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reply to post by pavil
 


"Fireworks" is an understatement :-D.

There isn't any precedent for this one, but from what I have read on the subject, here's my 'best guess':

Since the electors are bound by nothing more (or less) than tradition to follow their pledged votes, the eventual outcome of the election will depend on just how close the election was (in terms of electoral votes). The electors pledged to McCain will probably follow their traditional mandate and cast for McCain.

On the Democratic side of things, the simplest outcome (which, given politics, isn't necessarily what we'll get) would be that the electors pledged to the Obama / Edwards ticket vote their pledges, Obama posthumously becomes President in this case, then, since he can't perform the duties of office, Vice President Edwards becomes President Edwards, and chooses a new V.P. for himself. Senator Clinton would be a logical choice. Yes, that's the *simple* version.


Given the acrimony in the Democratic party, there's another scenario that's almost guaranteed to set off pyrotechnics from coast to coast, and probably wind up with its own forum in some hypothetical future version of ATS. If the Democratic electors *don't* vote their pledges (after all, who would vote for a dead man, outside of Chicago?), things get ugly. The Democratic electors will probably wind up split between Obama loyalists hoping for the "simple" scenario above, in a coalition with Edwards supporters, and opposed by Clinton supporters. The split nature of the Democratic vote could (if the election were as close as the last few) could then result in President John S. McCain, even if he lost the popular and electoral vote to the Obama / Edwards ticket. Mayhem ensues.



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