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Why is the Universe expanding ?

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posted on May, 9 2008 @ 02:02 PM
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This is a question that we still haven't found a definite proven answer for. But I believe questions such as these are the most exciting to think about.


Why is the Universe expanding ? Nowadays most people would tell you that it is because of the repulsive effects of dark energy in the cosmos. This dark energy is supposedly filling up all space and has a particular very small density.
In this post I want to present an idea that I recently conjured up while thinking about this topic.

In school when you're taught about the Universe and the fact that it is expanding, you are often taught that the expansion of the Universe is analogous to an inflating balloon. If you have points on a balloon, as the balloon is inflated, the separation of each of the points increases in the same ratio.
An interesting analogy indeed, and it works very well and explains the situation quite simply. So simply, that for a second lets imagine this is actually the case.
The universe is now a balloon. It is inflating and so the separation of points ( which are analogous to galaxies) is increasing. Now ask yourself what is really causing this expansion. Is it some weird substance residing on the balloons elastic surface that we call dark energy ? Any 5 year old will tell you ; "off course not, the balloon is inflating because of the air that is being blown into the balloon" . This is exactly the point that I want to bring forth. If the universe really was like a balloon, then the entity that is causing the repulsion is not part of the 4 dimensional space-time of the universe. Instead it is a pressure that is exerted on the plane of the universe and it originates outside the universe in some kind of hyperspace. The entity is analogous to air that is blown in, and it exerts pressure on the inner surface of the balloon or universe) and causes an expansion of the elastic of the balloon or spacetime of our universe.

Now to take this wonderful analogy even further. Now that I have established that the repulsive entity is analogous to air pressure on the inside of a balloon. Lets think about how the pressure or force acts ( i'm interchanging these cause pressure is simply force per unit area). The force acts at 90 degrees to the elastic of the balloon and causes the elastic to stretch. If the balloon was the universe and we were part of the milky way galaxy that was a point on our balloon, we would not have any conception of the true direction of the force acting on the universe and causing its expansion. We would be led to believe that a repulsive substance existed on our own 4 dimensional plane and it was this that was causing the expansion. I believe this is the origin of our misguided view of dark energy. The actual force of repulsion causing the expansion of our universe may not dwell within our 4 -dimensional space-time, but may actually exist on a separate 5th spatial dimension of hyperspace that we are not aware of and cannot conceive.

This is my hypothesis so far. The question I still have to find an answer for in my theory, is what exactly is this force in the 5th dimension of hyperspace that is causing an expansion of our own 4-dimensional space-time. In other words what is inflating the balloon ? And what is the balloon being filled with ?

Your thoughts ? What do you think is the cause of this expansion ? Do you think I have a point !? Or do you think i'm talking garbage ? Feedback.




posted on May, 10 2008 @ 04:25 PM
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The universe is expanding as a result of it all being compressed into a single point, and then "Exploding" a long time ago. You throw a ball in space, and it keeps going until it hits something.

It only takes a singular(pun intended) force to cause everything in space to move, and continue moving indefinitely, because there is no resistance.

There is no case for a constantly-involved force, such as what you are implying.



posted on May, 10 2008 @ 05:55 PM
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The universe is expanding because of dark matter/energy which pushes against gravity.

Many thought the universe was expanding because of the big bang but if that was the case the universe would be slowing down not accelerating.

If you shoot a rocket on the 4th of July it will slow down and fall to the ground because of gravity. The only way it will accelerate is if another force pushes it.

Some think we are accelerating from the alpha point to the omega point which is absolute zero. When we reach absolute zero it will be Heaven so to speak or perfect symmetry.

We are actually less than 5 degrees away from absolute zero. There's questions on wether we could reach absolute zero. Also, some of the missing matter could be part of the universe that has reached absolute zero and is beyond our observation. Like a singularity so to speak.

At absolute zero we will have reached zero point and a pure energy state.

Check out this site. It's very interesting.
everythingforever.com...



posted on May, 10 2008 @ 06:40 PM
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Originally posted by polomontana
The universe is expanding because of dark matter/energy which pushes against gravity.

Many thought the universe was expanding because of the big bang but if that was the case the universe would be slowing down not accelerating.

If you shoot a rocket on the 4th of July it will slow down and fall to the ground because of gravity. The only way it will accelerate is if another force pushes it.

Some think we are accelerating from the alpha point to the omega point which is absolute zero. When we reach absolute zero it will be Heaven so to speak or perfect symmetry.

We are actually less than 5 degrees away from absolute zero. There's questions on whether we could reach absolute zero. Also, some of the missing matter could be part of the universe that has reached absolute zero and is beyond our observation. Like a singularity so to speak.

At absolute zero we will have reached zero point and a pure energy state.

Check out this site. It's very interesting.
everythingforever.com...


The universe is, on the whole, at about 3 kelvin. It won't really get any significant amount colder, and it certainly can't reach absolute zero. Eventually, all the stars will burn out, and the whole universe will reach equilibrium temperature. At that point, the universe will be over, for all intents and purposes. There will be no useful energy left, only the constant, ~3k background radiation. Life of any and all kinds will be impossible. Some enterprising civilizations could survive past the point at which most of the universe undergoes this, by saving up energy and living in extrordinarially energy efficient systems, but that would only net them an extra paltry few trillion years or so to live. Entropy will get you eventually, no matter what you do. The only way to survive is to exit the universe itself for greener pastures.

After even longer (in fact, a ridiculously unfathomably long time) , through various quantum effects, all the matter in the universe will decay away, and all that will remain is the background radiation.

Of course, mankind as we know it almost certainly won't be around for any of that, whether it's because we blow ourselves up, get annihilated by a disaster, or we continue on, stronger than ever, into an age of transhumanism.



posted on May, 11 2008 @ 12:11 AM
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There is no case for a constantly-involved force, such as what you are implying.


A constant force is required Sharker, because the universe is expanding at an accelerating rate.

After the Big Bang, the Universe was expanding, the rate of expansion then slowed down as matter began to accumulate from all the energy at a lower temperature. Then for some mysterious reason, the expansion began to speed up again. Many people attribute this to dark energy.
What i'm saying is that it could have been caused by a force that does not exist on our own 3-brane universe ( borrowing a term from M -theory), but may have been a result of a force in the greater hyperspace outside our universal brane. I have suggested a possible mechanism for this kind of interaction in my first post in this thread.




Also, some of the missing matter could be part of the universe


Now that you have mentioned the missing matter. Another suggestion to this problem :
You see physicists have come to the conclusion that there is missing matter that we have to account for in order to explain expansion, etc. Now it may be possible, that they have come to an incorrect conclusion, because they have not taken into account the effects that the greater hyperspace may be having on our universe.

[edit on 11-5-2008 by siddharthsma]



posted on May, 11 2008 @ 01:12 AM
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Siddharthsma,

Kudos for the thought you've put into framing your question about the mysterious force that's expanding the universe. But I invite you to consider that there is no such thing as an expanding universe.

The Big Bang theory came about from the observation of an allegedly expanding universe. That evidence was, simply, that light coming in from an ever-increasing distant source showed an ever-increasing "redshift". The redshift was presumed to be caused by the expanding "fabric" of spacetime -- the proverbial balloon.

But, if an expanding universe expands "space", but not the galaxies that occupy it, then why would it stretch the frequency -- but not the amplitude -- of the light traversing it?

Take a look at the "Hubble Deep Field" photograph. They're the furthest objects ever photographed. Galaxies and galaxies, millions of light years apart, photographed just as they existed billions of years ago.

Yet these are not "proto-galaxies". They look just like all of the other galaxies we've photographed that are (relatively) close to home.

As for the redshift meaning an expanding universe: Also consider that there exists a measurable "gravitational redshift". It's caused by light traveling through gravitational "fields". And light that travels long distances is constantly traveling through gravitational fields. However weak they may be at any given inter-galactic moment, they add up over time.


Edited for puncutation, grammer, spelling, clarity... you know the drill...


[edit on 11-5-2008 by Tuning Spork]



posted on May, 11 2008 @ 03:06 AM
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The Dark Energy/gravitational-red shift question is one of the more fascinating debates. It will be interesting to see which one gains more acceptance.

(I'm routing for DE, so I can continue to defend flat earth theory)




[edit on 11-5-2008 by _Del_]



posted on May, 11 2008 @ 08:56 AM
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As for the redshift meaning an expanding universe: Also consider that there exists a measurable "gravitational redshift". It's caused by light traveling through gravitational "fields". And light that travels long distances is constantly traveling through gravitational fields. However weak they may be at any given inter-galactic moment, they add up over time.


Looks like your a supporter of Zwicky's theory of "tired light". However, this cannot be the case for a number of reasons. Firstly, I don't think the gravitational redshift is enough to cause the shifts observed in the emission spectrums. Also there is the problem of uniformity ; Hubble's law tells us the recessional velocity ( measured from redshifts ) is proportional to the galaxies distance from us ( if i'm not wrong distance of stars from us is estimated from observations of stars called cepheid variables). If Gravity is responsible, then it suggests the density of matter is completely uniform in space, this is obviously not the case.





Take a look at the "Hubble Deep Field" photograph. They're the furthest objects ever photographed. Galaxies and galaxies, millions of light years apart, photographed just as they existed billions of years ago.


This is something I've got to see ! If this is the case it will indeed lay doubt on the Big Bang theory.
As far as I knew, the furtherest observed galaxies are primarily Quasars. Which would fit the Big Bang theory.




But, if an expanding universe expands "space", but not the galaxies that occupy it, then why would it stretch the frequency -- but not the amplitude -- of the light traversing it?


Why would it affect amplitude ? Simply Doppler shift isn't it ?



posted on May, 11 2008 @ 09:09 AM
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Originally posted by siddharthsma

This is a question that we still haven't found a definite proven answer for. But I believe questions such as these are the most exciting to think about.


Why is the Universe expanding ?

Your thoughts ? What do you think is the cause of this expansion ? Do you think I have a point !? Or do you think i'm talking garbage ? Feedback.


I think the universe is expanding because God is expanding.

peace

Duncan



posted on May, 12 2008 @ 11:33 PM
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Originally posted by siddharthsma


Take a look at the "Hubble Deep Field" photograph. They're the furthest objects ever photographed. Galaxies and galaxies, millions of light years apart, photographed just as they existed billions of years ago.


This is something I've got to see ! If this is the case it will indeed lay doubt on the Big Bang theory.
As far as I knew, the furtherest observed galaxies are primarily Quasars. Which would fit the Big Bang theory.


That's what I remember learning, too. But here ye go:

www.youtube.com...



posted on May, 13 2008 @ 11:45 AM
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Well watched th video, so .... no mention of any normal galaxies or absent quasars.



posted on May, 13 2008 @ 11:51 AM
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Originally posted by siddharthsma
Why is the Universe expanding?


The universe is expanding because the living things in it (us, as far as we know for now) are getting more imaginative. Living consciousness and imagination bring things out of virtuality and into reality. That's basic quantum mechanics as elucidated by Pauli, Heisenberg, et al. And since whatever is imagined occupies a bit of real spacetime, the more things that are imagined the more spacetime must expand to accommodate it.



posted on May, 18 2008 @ 06:54 AM
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I think the most pressing question here is not 'why is the universe expanding?', but 'what is the universe expanding into?'. I have never been quite able to put my finger on that one...

If anyone can shed any light on it I might be able to start sleeping again, as it tends to keep me awake at night



posted on May, 18 2008 @ 08:21 AM
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reply to post by siddharthsma
 


What you have said totally agrees with my own personal theories on expansion of the universe. Something is 'inflating' the very fabric of space/time. Something we cannot detect because it lies outside of our observable universe, just like the 2 dimensional dots on a balloon cannot conceive the existence or the 3rd dimensional air acting upon them.

I also think that the universe is not expanding at an increasing rate, just that the fabric between matter (galaxies) is growing therefore creating the illusion that the further things are away, the faster they are moving. They aren't so much as moving within space at an accelerated rate, but space itself is growing and pulling them with it. So the more space between objects, the fast and further they appear to be moving away.

Just my thoughts.

Just want to add that also the expansion of the fabric of space is only observable on very large distances. I believe the ALL space is affected by this expansion, including the space between atoms. But it is very small and can only be observed when the 'chunks' of space are huge, like between galaxies.



[edit on 18-5-2008 by Toasty]



posted on May, 19 2008 @ 03:01 AM
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You might want to first prove the universe is actually expanding before you try to rap you head around this one.

So far there is no 100% valid proof that the universe is expanding.



posted on May, 19 2008 @ 07:31 AM
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I know it may it may seem like i'm arguing with myself. But here is a problem I see with my own theory ;
It seems to answering less questions than it creates. Because now one has to start thinking about the nature of the hyperspace outside our own universe brane.




I think the most pressing question here is not 'why is the universe expanding?', but 'what is the universe expanding into?'. I have never been quite able to put my finger on that one...


An interesting question indeed. Yesterday I got an idea that may answer this question. However, I haven't had much time to think about this properly. Plus I have my A level exams , so I really shouldn't be thinking of such things now ! Perhaps after exams and some thinking I will present my idea on ATS. The idea makes some big proposals, and at the moment seems to completely contradict Hawking when he came up with Hawking radiation. It also attempts to explain the origin of mass and such things.
I'll soon be back with my answer.



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