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Bouncing Solar System killed the dinosaurs

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posted on May, 9 2008 @ 12:27 AM
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Was the demise of the dinosaurs 65 million years ago somehow linked to our Solar System's journey through the galaxy? The way our Sun and its retinue of planets bounces through the galactic plane may occasionally send comets hurtling to Earth, say researchers.


This is very interesting. We have been lloking to out outer solar system to try and find rogue asteroids and have still only discovered a tiny %
Now if we allow for the fact that the solar system is also travelling possibly towards other asteroid or commet fields the chances of coming across another huge object (or even a collection of huge objects) is greatly increased.


Astrobiologist William Napier and his team ran simulations of the Solar System's two directions of motion, while also factoring in the Sun's random encounters with giant molecular star forming clouds. Napier said that passages through these denser parts of the galaxy are responsible for the Oort cloud disturbances.


This being the case, not only are we constantly in threat of coming across some rogue interstellar object, but out own system (and oort cloud) is effected as we pass by other large objects.

This got me thinking that not only might we encounter other 'object' but it has been suggested that external cosmc rays have an effects on our global weather. If we are passing other suns and solar systems that would greatly impact the amount of cosmic debris reaching us. We have all argued about the solar cycles and our weather patterns in the GW/GC discussions but this is something that never gets a look in but probably should be considered. Which is something I suggested in this thread a while back with this link




posted on May, 9 2008 @ 03:25 AM
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Originally posted by VIKINGANT
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This got me thinking that not only might we encounter other 'object' but it has been suggested that external cosmc rays have an effects on our global weather. If we are passing other suns and solar systems that would greatly impact the amount of cosmic debris reaching us. We have all argued about the solar cycles and our weather patterns in the GW/GC discussions but this is something that never gets a look in but probably should be considered. Which is something I suggested in this thread a while back with this link


Yes once our Sun rises up on the flat pane of Milky way galaxy and start orbiting it, sure we will have to face the consequences of intergalactic radiation and cosmic rays. It is very unlikely we will encounter other objects while we orbit Milky way galaxy as everything else also moving forward at the same pace. Yes we might go through the thick area of cosmic cloud and that will have great impact on our solar system.

I read some where that the same bounce effect will help life to spread; scientists suggest the impact may have thrown debris containing micro-organisms out into space and across the universe. Chances life on earth might be a result of an impact somewhere else.



posted on May, 9 2008 @ 04:04 AM
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I suppose the answer to the question is: No

Because the Chicxulub impact (and other possible impacts) were only one contributory factor in the demise of the dinosaurs etc at the end of the Cretaceous - climate change, sea level changes, changes in vegetation and the massive Deccan Traps volcanic eruptions being other contributory factors.

The idea that a meteorite impact alone was responsible has been largely discarded by most geologists now.



posted on May, 9 2008 @ 05:49 AM
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Originally posted by Essan
I suppose the answer to the question is: No

Because the Chicxulub impact (and other possible impacts) were only one contributory factor in the demise of the dinosaurs etc at the end of the Cretaceous - climate change, sea level changes, changes in vegetation and the massive Deccan Traps volcanic eruptions being other contributory factors.

But could the impact have triggered the other factors? they all seemed to be around the same time. If not the impact the cosmic ray factor perhaps?


The idea that a meteorite impact alone was responsible has been largely discarded by most geologists now.

It is amazing how all the differnent disciplines can come up with different results given the same facts. Geologists discard this but astrologists suport it.



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