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Smallest unit of time?

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posted on Feb, 28 2004 @ 03:56 AM
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I read a couple of months ago a book. It wasn't a very special book, just Theif of Time by Terry Pratchet. It's a fictional work, if none of you have read any of his Discworld series. Anyway, although the story is fictional, Terry Pratchet suggests an interesting theory: That there must be a smallest unit of time - the time it takes to go from now to then, or from before to now. It kind of makes sense. If time was just one slur, then every time would be the same moment, so does anyone else think that there must be a smallest unit of time? I reckon there is, but that it is just way too small for us to measure accurately, although if we could it would be even more accurate than those super-atomic clocks we have floating around the planet.




posted on Feb, 28 2004 @ 04:12 AM
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id say this is pretty damn close
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posted on Feb, 28 2004 @ 11:26 AM
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And what does make that those small units of time go over in one another? Exactly, there has to be another action-reaction which takes time, so there is time between those time units. So time is a flowing line.



posted on Feb, 28 2004 @ 11:26 AM
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edit: doublepost



[Edited on 28-2-2004 by LeenBekkemaa]



posted on Feb, 29 2004 @ 01:41 AM
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Well, that depends on what you think is smallest. If with smallest, you mean the smallest accurately measurable, then there is a smallest unit of time. It's called Planck time and it is 5.4 x 10^-44 s. It is similar to the Planck length in that below those times and lengths everything becomes fuzzy and not really measurable. Quantum fluctuations take over.



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