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The Homeless Survival Guide

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posted on Jun, 12 2008 @ 11:42 AM
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reply to post by fleetwingq8
 


fleetwing,

sounds like you are very familiar with how the underground works. Perhaps some stories of your days traveling with the "Dead" "Phish" and others might enlighten some here as to how groups manage to get along without.

respectfully

reluctantpawn

P.S. work is out there to be had and at the most unlikely places if you can keep your mouth shut. Try strip clubs, biker bars and gay bars. Most will pay in cash and forget who you are.




posted on Jun, 12 2008 @ 08:37 PM
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Let me state that I've never been homeless but I have been so broke that I didn't have money for food. Since pride is now out of the way. Here's something I've learned being very broke: You can pick up enough coins around convenience stores, strip malls and laundry mats on a daily basis to keep yourself fed in ramen noodles and other canned foods. Stay away from any place with a security guard ie Walmart and big shopping malls. Most urban area have aluminum recycling centers. People are still throwing away aluminum cans at a prodigious rate.. They pay $0.66/lb here in Austin at the metal recyclers. . A shopping cart full of them will bring you in some money and keep you off the radar. As far as bedding down some place, I'd look for abandoned lots and/or houses. Keep a sharp out for tools while your walking around. I've picked at least $200-300 worth of tools that have fallen off work vehicles over the years. Most small tools but I found a Sawzall one time just lying on the side of the road while I was jogging. HTH

[edit on 12-6-2008 by crgintx]



posted on Jun, 13 2008 @ 02:38 PM
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probably the best advice I can give to someone facing or is homeless is to put most of your focus into finding a "rescue mission" or "salvation army" in a less dangerous part of the country and then beg or borrow to get enougy for a bus there.Here in PA we have some pretty no really good programs.I just got out of the rescue mission here in lebanon,PA and I have to say the experience wasnt bad.they have a 9 month program and the town/people in the area are pretty nice.after the 9 months they give you 3 to 4 months to save money from working to get on your feet.they also have a salvation army that actually pays you 20 a week to work for them while you stay there rent/bill/ free.then when you graduate their program you are garenteed full time work,and help with housing.I know its not like this everywhere but here in PA it is,so try to get here for a chance to get off the street and get on your feet



posted on Jun, 13 2008 @ 03:13 PM
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I dont know if this will be of any help but ......

I have just watched a TV program on ITV (UK) (tonight) and it showed how much food is wasted without ever being opened.

It was basically all about the 'Sell by Date' that is printed on all foods. A TV presenter spent 2 weeks eating out of date food, all to no ill effects at all.

In the TV program he met someone who is a 'Freegan'. He is someone that goes around all the supermarkets after they have closed and rumages around in their waste bins. You would not beleive the amount of food that was thrown out. Quite a lot of it was through to having damaged packaging or tins having dents in them.

The presenter and the 'Freegan' then took the food around to one of the UK's best loved TV Chefs Anthony Warrell Thompson. He looked at it all and couldnt believe it either and said that he had no problem with cooking it, which he did. There was nothing wrong with the food at all.

The only thing that Chef Thompson said was to watch out for Chicken and Fish. He said that packets like Pasta and Tins he wouldnt worry too much about.

I hope that helps out ........ though I suspect you already knew this.



posted on Jun, 14 2008 @ 12:18 PM
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forgive me if this has been mentioned... but one should also keep in mind that when/if a global cataclysm arrives one should definitely try to avoid the cities and populated places, instead learn how, if possible, to survive in the wilderness areas, roam and stay away from people unless you know for sure that its a survival camp open to helping strangers, remeber to put your faith in God and try to stay as non-violent as possible, in fact because you will be hungry, and in the wilderness you will receive the spirit of God more readily, simplly listen to the small voice inside yourself and dedicate yourself to doing God's will...



posted on Jun, 15 2008 @ 09:57 PM
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reply to post by LordBaskettIV
 


I am curious if you would mind sharing how you built your power station? I am hoping to build an affordable power source for off grid and am finding it difficult to find instructions on building one that is close to being affordable. Thank you.

BTW. Excellent excellent insights from everyone who has shared here. So many people have no idea how fortunate they are and how easily they could find themsleves in this situation.



posted on Jun, 22 2008 @ 05:00 AM
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This is an excellent thread. I am sure that it will be helpful to some people. But if I was facing the situation of homelessness I would just have to kill myself. I am sorry but that is no way to live life. As a matter of fact that is not living, its just existing in a state of death on earth.



posted on Jun, 22 2008 @ 09:18 PM
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reply to post by kj6754
 


Suicide: the permanent solution to a temporary problem. Why on earth would you ever post such a statement? There are far worse situations in this world than being homeless which folks recover from.



posted on Jun, 22 2008 @ 09:49 PM
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Originally posted by crgintx
reply to post by kj6754
 


Suicide: the permanent solution to a temporary problem. Why on earth would you ever post such a statement? There are far worse situations in this world than being homeless which folks recover from.


why would I post such a statement? Well, because it is true. There is no way i'd let myself spend one day on the streets. I'd protect my heart before all else. Some people can't handle that kind of pressure.



[edit on 23-6-2008 by kj6754]



posted on Jun, 23 2008 @ 08:49 PM
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reply to post by kj6754
 


That is not a wise thing to even think about. I have lived many alternative types of lifestyles. I find that a minimalist self sufficient one that suits me best. If not for family I might actually go back to this type of lifestyle. It really does have some upsides to it. I travelled extensively and actually had plenty of work and places to stay. Yes it does have some drawbacks and pitfalls, but it sometimes beats the stress of working 40 plus hours, bills to pay and schedules to keep. It is apparrent though that you may not have the mental toughness to deal with a changing environmet let alone survive any type of change. Life is change and a journey to be enjoyed. The life I lived was carefree and joyous most of the time. It is all how you look at it. Does image and posessions mean so much to you?

respectfully

relucyantpawn



posted on Jul, 1 2008 @ 11:00 PM
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reply to post by jackinthebox
 


so you are homless, but you have a computer, and graphic editing software?

and the internet??



something sounds strange




on topic: Nice guide, llyod, well written and thought out



posted on Jul, 1 2008 @ 11:15 PM
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reply to post by Andrew E. Wiggin
 


Still following me around I see. Are you lost little doggie?

Yes I am homeless. Yes I have internet access, but no I don't have my own computer.



something sounds strange


I'll bet that happens to you often. Can't figure things out too well can you?



[edit on 7/1/0808 by jackinthebox]



posted on Jul, 2 2008 @ 12:07 AM
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This is an amazing thread. I am impressed with all the advice and incredible stories of survival. I too was once almost homeless (about 3 years ago) but I worked my buns off and burnt the midnight oil for as long as it took to get back on my feet to prevent homelessness. You could say I was lucky, but not so sure luck had anything to do with that. It was pure focus, perseverance and determination that landed me softly into a better situation. I sprouted wings I guess.

Thank you all for keeping this thread alive. I am sure there are many people who could benefit from all the advice here and the feeling is there will be many more in need of it very soon..

"When you come to the end of your rope, tie a knot and hang on. "
~ Franklin D. Roosevelt



posted on Jul, 2 2008 @ 12:19 AM
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reply to post by LLoyd45
 


This is indeed an awesome thread

I've scanned thru all the posts and didn't see anyone post a link to this site

I found this site invaluable when I was homeless for a couple months a few years back...I'm sure a lot of the stuff has been covered in the tons of great posts in here already, but there might be a few little tidbits that might help someone out

Again, great post

Peace



posted on Jul, 2 2008 @ 01:19 AM
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Yes indeed! Great thread Lloyd

While I usually skim around here most of the time, I have spent my last hour or so soaking all of this up into the brain.. very captivating and touching tales.... man, If I could, you would all get a star! This is a prime example of why I love this place.




reply to post by Andrew E. Wiggin
 


Welcome to the digital age my friend, you may want to take a look at this guy... he seems to be getting along just fine... computer and all.


www.chrisdiclerico.com...


T-
[ed fixed who I was replying to.. doh!]

[edit on 2-7-2008 by telemetry]



posted on Jul, 2 2008 @ 01:43 AM
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reply to post by Andrew E. Wiggin
 


Almost every public library in the country offers free high speed internet access these days. There is also plenty of free wifi access out there. There are plenty of 'homeless folks' out there who hold jobs and live on the street because they can't afford to pay rent in places like NYC, LA,CA. , or Chicago. They shower at the YMCA or some other hostel. I 'hosted' a young German couple in the UK that were hitchhiking around the world when I was stationed there from 94-96. They had been hitching for more than a year. Being homeless doesn't necessarily mean being desperate or miserable.



posted on Jul, 11 2008 @ 11:50 PM
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I was on the streets for a while when I was younger and the one thing that kept me safe the most were my road dogs. I fell in with 3 other homeless guys and we made our camp in this little area tucked in between a church and a wall where the pastor stored stuff and didn't mind us back there as we were always polite and kept things neat. Aside from keeping each other's spirits up we had strength in numbers and am pleased to say we never had anyone mess around with us and always felt safe. The church and another church nearby helped us some with showers and food and some clothing too. Maybe I was just lucky to meet up with decent folk who were just in a rut and not the bad types that are out there as we saw plenty of them downtown Phoenix when going to eat at the St. Vincents kitchen.



posted on Jul, 24 2008 @ 12:44 AM
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Great thread, I really enjoyed reading all the advice. I grew up with nothing, and my family was never anything that I could depend on, in fact, I was the resourceful one who helped everyone else out. I have never been homeless, but I spent a lot of years on the edge of being on the streets. One time I found myself without a job, and needing to come up with the rent money soon. I went and hit every business nearby looking for work, and within a week I had three part time jobs. Construction sites are always a good place to find work. Be nice, be honest, kiss butt if necessary, keep your mouth shut about your opinions, agree with what ever these peoples beliefs are unless they are looking for honesty, and show that you can be trusted, and you can find sources of income.

What seems to be common throughout the thread for most people, and what I have found myself, is that good friends and allies are are your best assets in life. There is safety in numbers, and help when you are down, both physically, mentally, and spiritually. If you are a decent trustworthy person, other decent and trustworthy people will want to be friends with you.

As far as food is concerned, I say forget the top ramen, and go with potatoes, yams, and eggs. Chicken broth and beef broth also do wonders to spice up a meal. A meal of a raw yam and a couple of eggs are about the most nutritious things you can eat, and the cheapest as well. Don't want to eat things raw, I understand. I suggest anyone about who winds up on the street, or is living on the street with a little bit of money to spend, go to a camping store, or the sports department of someplace like Walmart, and get yourself a stearno stove and a mess kit. Stearno stoves are very efficient, easy to pack up and carry, and can cook most meals easily and quickly. Slice up half a yam or a potato, throw in a couple of eggs, some cinnamon, or salt and pepper, some vegetable oil, or those butter packets from KFC, and you have yourself an extremely rich vitamin and protein fuel source for the body. Limes are another great food source. Limes pack the most punch in vitamin C, and also work as a great spice for cooking. Squeeze a slice of lime into a cup of water daily, and you can avoid getting sick. Also, if you have any cuts or sores, or acne problems, rubbing the lime on the affected area after squeezing most of the juice into your cup of water will avoid any infections and clear up such problems faster than any medications you can buy that cost a whole lot more money. Sure it will sting like hell, but it will also cure the problem much more quickly. Instead of buying Top Ramen, buy a big cheap bag of pasta, and flavor it with chicken broth. Raw vegetables are also a great food source. Buy a bag of mixed vegetables and eat that as a snack, you will get far more nutrition than you will from about any other food source.

Also, if you are young enough, and you don't have a criminal record, the military is a good way to go. Join the Navy of the Air Force if you don't want to be on the streets of Baghdad. If you get good test scores on your entrance exam and make it through boot camp, chance are good that you can learn a trade to help you throughout your life. That is how I succeeded at life. Also the military teaches you discipline, and gives you confidence in yourself. Not only that, but you will be forced to learn to tolerate other cultures and ways of life, and probably have quite a few excellent adventures and make some great friends. I highly recommend the military to all young people, it is an incredible learning experience.

For families who are homeless or facing homelessness, I feel for you, as a father that is the greatest nightmare I can think of. Finding other families that you can trust is probable the most important thing that you can do. If you don't have family that you can rely on, find a good group, or an association that will help you. You will need help. Swallow your pride, learn to be a good judge of character, and seek out good help. Obtaining and maintaining a good vehicle is probably one of the most important things a family facing dire straits can do. A vehicle can be a home, and will always be better than being on the streets with children. Obtain tools and learn how to work on your vehicle. Keep it filled with the proper fluids, let it warm up a few minutes before driving, and don't push it hard. Being careful not to push a vehicle too hard when driving, it is one of the most important things to keeping a vehicle running properly. If I was facing homelessness with a family, I would head south before the winter. Single parents should be very leery about partners, but a good partner could be the best thing for hard times. You need someone to look after your children while you are working, or looking for work. As a last resort, I would turn my children in to child services rather than try to live on the streets with them, without a vehicle.

From my understanding, even if you don't have rent money, in most states, the Landlord still must give you at least thirty days notice before eviction. It would be worth it to seek out free legal assistance if facing eviction. If the landlord shows up telling you that you have to leave immediately, with out prior written notice, chances are that you can call the police, and they will not force you out of your home without prior written notice, especially if you have children. Most places offer families in such dire times assistance in order to avoid kicking them out on the streets. Be proactive, find out what resources are available to you ahead of time.



posted on Jul, 24 2008 @ 05:50 AM
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Jack

If you don't have anyone who depends on you where you are currently living, I highly reccomend a trip down south before winter arrives. You can probably find work down there easily, camp out on the beach, fish, and live the good life for awhile, and it will probably be better for your health. You could probably use a change of scenary.

BTW, I been meaning to ask, not sure if I haven't already, but are you Freedom from the ole NYT forums, cause your story is very similar to his, and your writing and attitude reminds me of the same poster. If not, you've got a personallity twin out there somewhere.



posted on Jul, 24 2008 @ 03:41 PM
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Here in Canada rents have risen so much in just a few years that I can't see even a middle class family being able to pay 1200 plus for an apartment, in Kelowna BC, where my son is going to college, and their are higher, or a house 1600 to over 2000, anywhere, or a townhouses going for over 1400 everywhere. The poor are being systematically murdered as far as I'm concerned, but even the middle class are being squeezed to death. Many small businesses will feel the pinch, as nearly everyones last dollar goes to necessities, and who can save for ownership. Anyone without a paid off home of their own, is in danger of becoming homeless themselves. Yes, I have family, but who knows what lies ahead. And I have children. I'm going to buy a tent real soon, and then try to save up for a tent trailor, and study survival things a bit. Especially interested in studying winter habitats and ways of staying warm in a pinch. Need to print out and make solar cooking oven plans and slowly get ready. Sling shots and fishing rods. Thank you for this thread, it gives a small glimmer of hope in an area that gives many near heart attacks contemplating this. I think finding a kindred spirit and forming a small community might be a good idea too, especially if it happens to many in the future and they took to the woods.






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