The Homeless Survival Guide

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posted on May, 6 2008 @ 08:43 AM
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I know the life all too well. I was lucky though as MI has the 10 cent bottle deposit and the area i was in had regular recycling pickup. Alot of people just put their pop and beer cans/bottles in their recycling bins. Once I figured out which neighborhoods had their pickup on which day I could get enough money to eat. But try and go as early as you can so you dont offend the people living there.




posted on May, 6 2008 @ 08:51 AM
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Originally posted by amorso
Interesting thread, but it's too bad LLoyd45 had to plagiarize the writting of a true homeless person.
I've seen that article too, and I did follow a similar format. It among others, gave me the idea of writing a post about my personal experiences. I'm not a writer, and it followed a logical structure.

I didn't need to plagiarize a homeless guy, because I was homeless guy myself, and had many of the same experiences. Many here have also shared experiences that parrallel those. Im sorry if that bothers you.

I posted a couple of months ago about my experiences too, I just never got around to making them a separate posting. My intent of this post was to help others who found themselves in a bad situation, which many may in the near future.



posted on May, 6 2008 @ 09:46 AM
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I found that being homeless isn't just not having a place to live. You can be trapped as well. Depends on where you live. I think a lot of this thread (BTW THANKS TO THE OP FOR SHARING - S&F'D) is very useful, but it doesn't address the horror of being homeless with children.

My family narrowly escaped this fate in the late 90's. We (6+ people if you count those we allow to stay with us now the we're not homeless) can't simply squat or find a cubbyhole to shelter in overnight. Does any one have some advice for the 'nearly homeless' family unit?

'Causes' notwithstanding, there aren't any 'tent' communities where I am (in the North East) and the locals are very 'upscale' people who make great statements about their sympathy, but in the end think of homeless as a blight on the landscape so to speak. Local law enforcement tends to see things their way.



posted on May, 6 2008 @ 10:07 AM
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Originally posted by Maxmars
I found that being homeless isn't just not having a place to live. You can be trapped as well. Depends on where you live. I think a lot of this thread (BTW THANKS TO THE OP FOR SHARING - S&F'D) is very useful, but it doesn't address the horror of being homeless with children.

My family narrowly escaped this fate in the late 90's. We (6+ people if you count those we allow to stay with us now the we're not homeless) can't simply squat or find a cubbyhole to shelter in overnight. Does any one have some advice for the 'nearly homeless' family unit?

'Causes' notwithstanding, there aren't any 'tent' communities where I am (in the North East) and the locals are very 'upscale' people who make great statements about their sympathy, but in the end think of homeless as a blight on the landscape so to speak. Local law enforcement tends to see things their way.
I'm not sure where you live, but here's a link to The National Center on Family Homelessness Website. It has links to various agencies and services available to at risk families.



posted on May, 6 2008 @ 10:36 AM
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Originally posted by amorso
Interesting thread, but it's too bad LLoyd45 had to plagiarize the writting of a true homeless person.

Go to google and type in "Survival guide for living homeless in your car" go to the 9th link down from the top titled " The Joys (?) of being homeless " which was written by Jerry Leonard.

LLoyd plagiarized his writting as you will all see. LLoyd changed some of it and added little snippets of his own, but clearly plagiarized the majority of his "guide". Just wanted to share this with everyone here. Peace


I went to this website, and checked it out. It appears to LOOK the same, but upon a keyword check, it appears LLoyds work is his own. Like he said, it has about the same format, but thats not plagirism.

Is there anything specific you were talking about? Charging someone with Plagiarism isn't something I take lightly.

If you dont have anything specific in which you are talking about, I'd say you owe him an apology.

Seriously.



posted on May, 6 2008 @ 10:44 AM
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Originally posted by Totalstranger
I know the life all too well. I was lucky though as MI has the 10 cent bottle deposit and the area i was in had regular recycling pickup. Alot of people just put their pop and beer cans/bottles in their recycling bins. Once I figured out which neighborhoods had their pickup on which day I could get enough money to eat. But try and go as early as you can so you dont offend the people living there.


Also, they have this in Oregon., so your not going to find lots of bottles/cans lying around to collect on. Travel North across the bridge into Washington from Portland and you can find cans all over the place to turn in into Portland.
However, the cans have to be made in Oregon. The machines that estimate your can return number knows to dispose of non Oregon cans, and cans it doesnt know.
The #5 Tri-Met bus runs into Vancouver WA, and stops in Jantzen beach where theres a Safeway that has a can return center.
The #5 is stops in Vancouver near FISH, that I mentioned earlier.

Sorry my advice is centered around Portland, but MANY homeless kids wind up near there, and that where I spent my time as a homeless guy. (I was ACTUALLY homeless, not homeless by choice)



posted on May, 6 2008 @ 11:08 AM
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reply to post by kthulu
 


I am sure Oregon's bottle return is 5cents, and not 10. Although you probably meant about the bins in front of peoples' homes for the recycle to be picked up every week? That still happens.


That plagarism thing... Isn't there a 10% rule? Your work must be at LEAST 10% different than anothers' work in existence, or something? Either way, if I was going to do a huge helpful thread, I'd probably do some searching online to see if there was anything else relevant that could be added to help... Just a thought.

And no offense, but these days if someone has kids and ends up homeless, wouldn't they be charged with neglect or something and have the little ones taken away? Seriously, it takes a lot less to get CPS on your arse.



posted on May, 6 2008 @ 11:43 AM
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very interesting post.... in fact it's flagged for me just in case...cause you never know what might happen in the near future!



posted on May, 6 2008 @ 12:22 PM
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I have a question fro those that are/have been homeless. Michael Medved often talks about the homeless and claims that the majority fit into one or more of the following categories:

Mentally ill
Drug addict/Alcoholic
Criminal
Don't want to better themselves/IE: Bums
Have problems with adapting to mainstream
Can't hold a job, due in most part to their own issues

I have to say that I have noticed one or two in this thread that fit and the ones that seemed like just having bad luck made it a point to avoid most other homeless people.

So, is he correct?



posted on May, 6 2008 @ 12:33 PM
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Here's another helpfull item for cold weather.

Concrete blankets! The type that are black on one side and silver on the other. Very warm and stiff enough to form a tent like structure.

During one of the coldest winters here in denver, I was caught in a snowstorm away from camp. "found" a comcrete blanket and a short 2X4 and made my shelter for the night. By body heat alone it warmed enough so I could take off my boots and jacket. Lol, when I woke in the morning and opened up my "tent" there was about 4" of snow on my roof.

Speaking of boots for those unaware, take them off while you sleep! Frostbite is a VERY real threat to homeless folks in the winter.

All in all, my 1-1/2 years were an eye opening experience.



posted on May, 6 2008 @ 12:35 PM
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Originally posted by jbondo
I have a question fro those that are/have been homeless. Michael Medved often talks about the homeless and claims that the majority fit into one or more of the following categories:

Mentally ill
Drug addict/Alcoholic
Criminal
Don't want to better themselves/IE: Bums
Have problems with adapting to mainstream
Can't hold a job, due in most part to their own issues

I have to say that I have noticed one or two in this thread that fit and the ones that seemed like just having bad luck made it a point to avoid most other homeless people.

So, is he correct?


I think one of the major causes of homelessness is due to psychological issues. I have traveled all over the country homeless a few times and the majority of the people I met who seem to be perminent citizens of the streets have some sort of psychological disorder. The next biggest thing I have noticed are the younger kids who are homeless seem to be products of broken families, usually a father who was never there and or a mother who had drug issues and or was abusive or anything along those lines.

Anyway, yes alot of those do fit homeless people but its not as simple as just that.



posted on May, 6 2008 @ 12:52 PM
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I almost regret having posted the earlier comment about being homeless with children. I appreciate some of the advice, but the immediate propensity for people to scrutinize the 'why you are homeless' thing just irks me.

There are as many reasons for being homeless as there are people. As a parent, my concern is for my children. You needn't worry on my or any other homeless families behalf. The specter of having your family separated 'for the good of the children raises far too many issues to take lightly. I'm sure there are those who think the government (state/fed/county whatever) can 'care' for them. But some of us have actually seen the form that care can take. I won;t bother explaining.

It's enough to say that I won't be troubling with this thread any longer. In this arena, I will be the lurker I should have remained all along.

(Medved - Oh yeah, he's a REAL humanitarian.)



posted on May, 6 2008 @ 01:02 PM
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reply to post by LostNemesis
 



Just wish there was some way I could help people directly.


The time will come.

I sense pangs of guilt over your station in life. Put them aside. It is enough that you genuinely recognize the truths of poverty, without having to live them. That is precious. So few who have not lived it can understand, or empathize. When the time comes, I have no doubt that you will be one of the few who might actually make the difference.

May good fortune shine on you.



posted on May, 6 2008 @ 01:02 PM
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Here goes some of my tips for those that may become homeless.

Cooking, heating, and light.

Items needed:


Tuna can or can of similar dimensions.

Cardboard

Candles

lighter/Matches


Rip off a strip of cardboard to fit into the can roll it into a spiral and stuff it into the can. Take your candle, break the wax into small bits and sprinkle that on top of the cardboard inside the can. Light the wax aflame and you will have yourself a little makeshift stove, heat source, and light source for a couple hours.


Shelter.

I would suggest not sleeping in the open where people can see you, people are mean.

If you have a car or vehicle to sleep in a good place to go to park your vehicle is a store parking lot. I would advise not staying all day long or for days on end. Park your car only later in the evening when the store is either closed or not very busy. Most places wont give you any trouble, if they do just move to another.

If you have a tent try to find a nice secluded area in the woods not to far from the town or city you are nearest.

If you have no shelter of your own I would suggest a bridge that obviously has room for you to fit at least somewhat comfortably under. This will protect you a great bit more from the elements and other people.



And my last suggestion would be to befriend other homeless people that you feel comfortable around. You will be more secure in numbers, have someone to talk to, and somebody possibly move into your squat and hold down the fort with.

Thats it for now, if I think of anything else i will post again.



posted on May, 6 2008 @ 01:23 PM
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I spent times when i was homeless, but by some choice of my own. Back in Florida, as much as i do abhor the place, heat, humidity, traffic, people, not much nature left, and the police state, i was able to live easily on the beach. I'd swim out to the reef everyday with a Hawaiian sling, and spear me some fish. I'd also get coconuts, citrus, mangoes, cocoplums, and various plants/herbs that were grown as ornamentals. I'd carry a net hammock and set it up concealed in the bushes on the beach at night.

Most of the time it was homelessness by choice, as i really didn't want to live indoors, a roof overhead is overrated, but can be very convenient. I'd rather just go live off nature (even in the city) rather than play the slave game. It just made more sense to work for myself. If you do become homeless, make sure you treat your daily routines as your "job", apply good work ethic (if you have it) and make sure your boss (yourself) remains pleased with your performance. Strive for excellence in the occupation of being homeless, and it can become just as comfy, if not more so than trying to not be homeless.

Out of all the time i've spent in the craphole that is florida, the best times i've spent there were the times that i owned my spear, a snorkel, mask, fins, a shirt, some shorts, and a pair of inline skates. Skates would get me around on land quick, and i could also skate for recreation, there was plenty of stuff to skate, stairsets, handrails, walls, ledges, and lots of skaters. I'd fish most of the day, and skate until late night, then sleep in the bushes somewhere with my hammock (or just on the sand sometimes if i find a good spot).

One time i went from homeless to making a very solid 6 figures, i got a penthouse on the beach and filled it with fly gear like stereos and bigscreen tv's, and all kinds of toys. I'd still find myself living on the beach, spearfishing, every chance i didn't have to work, occasionally glancing up at the penthouse pad i had, and wondering why the hell i decided to go make the big bucks. It was just a complete waste. I don't really want to live in some silly box, even if it is a penthouse on the ocean.

Right now i live in government subsidized housing, AKA the Projects, but it's in a small town and i pretty much spend all my time outside of my little room. I mainly use it as a place to keep the stuff that won't fit in my backpack and on my bike. I'm working on reducing my load down though now so that i can easily be homeless and mobile, and i'm almost there. I've got a closet full of worldly possessions which i'm going to try to reduce down to about 6 milk crates full of stuff i own, that i can easily find a place to store without having to have a residence. I just hate being attached and obligated to belongings.

Being homeless in the city and trying to live the life off the streets is just nuts, there's a lot easier ways to do it if you adopt the attitude that you're going to do what it takes to stay off the streets and out of that scene. Be inventive and resourceful, ad also don't be lazy. Lazy homeless people are miserable, but if you put a little bit of hard work into your "job", then being homeless can be great. You're truly free when you have nothing. There's been times i've gone months without ever coming in contact with money. I just didn't want it, not a single dollar, i'd live off my surroundings and nothing more. Everybody's out hustling for cash, i'm harvesting fruits and fish, with no competition except that of other animals.

It's not easy when you think you've got to get out of being homeless, but where do you really have to go? Slave for someone or something that could care less about you as long as you're productive and make profit for the slavemasters, or work entirely for yourself for your existence.

I will admit though that a good compromise is a part time job for a person or organization that you believe in and that does good things, combined with low cost simple accommodations. Such is my situation right now, i make about about 9k/year during a good year, yet i live a life of abundance and happiness. I work a couple days a week doing something i absolutely love, and i'm extremely good at, cooking four star cuisine. I actually enjoy work so much i feel guilty about accepting money for it, and oftentimes will lie about my hours and "forget" to write a day or two down here and there. I'll work for 25-30 hrs but only take pay for about 20-25.

Truthfully, dignitywise, i think i'd consider fast food jobs as a VERY last resort, i'll keep my pride and not assemble burgers full time for $150 a week, there's no pride in being a wage slave, i'd be more proud digging through their dumpsters and feeding myself without selling my soul to the corporation. One note on dumpster diving though, you can fully build and furnish a house if you dumpster dive for the stuff. Construction materials, furniture, appliances, and even computers can be had from dumpsters. Pay attention and learn which dumpsters people regularly use for bulk trash. Dumpsters around short term rentals are promising, with enough units on the block, at least one ce a week somebody's abandoned belongings end up in a pile by the dumpster. I've furnished places starting from an empty room this way several times.


Also, if you're going to dumpster dive for food try to find food transfer stations and dive there. I used to dive in a dumpster next door to a frito lay warehouse. Anything that would expire within a week (too quickly to get it to the store and sell) would get tossed, unopened. I'd come back with full cases of chips and such, and stockpile 'em. I don't mind if they're a bit out of date, they stay good in the bag for a lot longer than the label says, and it beats diving for half eaten Whoppers.

Should you need money, it's everywhere, at least enough to feed yourself daily. Just look on the ground, you'll find change. Look around closed drive through windows of fast food places, banks, and anywhere where people are likely to drop money and not bother to pick it up if it's only a few cents. You can quickly acquire a few bucks this way. We did this all the time when we were kids, as well as other forms of hustle. If you decide to operate outside of the law, there's several low risk high payoff ventures that you can engage in. Don't rob anybody, don't deal drugs, ....CONTINUED



posted on May, 6 2008 @ 02:08 PM
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But use opportunities to skim a bit off the corporate structure. Soda machines contain a lot of change that can be had with a slight amount of ingenuity, i won't tell you how, but with some saltwater and a squeeze bottle, you can make a lot of money in a short time. Up to hundreds of dollars a night if you're a ninja about it and are smart about your tactics. It's also pretty hard to get caught unless you're a dumbass.

A step further from this concept, make yourself an ACE lock master key. It's VERY easy to construct and use, and you can actually pen the machines and take the dollars as well as the change. With a well planned route and sensible opertaional protocols, you could obtain several thousand dollars a night, hitting the right spots. Of course it's illegal, but sometimes you just NEED to do what you need to. This route though deviates from homeless survival a bit though as it's more of a ghetto survival tactic. If you're already living somewhat of a Gangsta street life then this isn't much of a stretch, but i'd advise against this sort of tactic unless you really need serious cash. If your mom's gonna be homeless unless she comes up with $2k for a payment by tomorrow, then it's worth it to operate using these methods.

Somewhat along these lines, if you're not averse to living on that side, you could always hook up with gangs. I've found myself in LA, screwed out of a contract by a major corporation, and broke. I hooked up with SouthSide 13 (VNE) out in East LA and had a place to stay, food to eat, stuff to puff, and a crew to roll with who truly OWNED the hood. There's downsides, like rival gangs, cops, and living in the hood, but it beat the hell out of my other options at the time. I'm not advising you join a gang for no reason, but having a team of thugs on your side is a helluva lot better than having them against you. It's also kept me out of some altercations with other southside cats, tossing up your set and block would break the ice. It's better to end up sippin 40's with thugs than to get your ass beat down. The real gangstas were some of the kindest and warm people i met in LA, they're tight knit, real family, not this pretend to like your neighbor crap. The Vatos are real stand up cats. And, even though i'm white, they treated me without prejudice, which is a lot more than i can say for the white folks i dealt with who tried to rob me and treat me like crap.

Again, i don't recommend it, but if you're already outside the law, wanted, or need to disappear, hooking up with this element of society can be a viable option. Try to hook up with the hood bosses, rather than the street level thugs, and you can get by without getting jumped in or shooting rivals, or other initiation rites. Bring a technical skill like hacking cellphones or credit cards and you'll get treated well, and not have to war on the frontlines like the foot soldiers, war from the science lab. Also counterintelligence is a good thing to bring to the table. Bring the knowledge of how to set up and use communications equipment like scanners and such to keep tabs on cops and rivals.

Stay off the frontlines though, let the ones who want to be street soldiers for hood glory sell crack and do collections, bring intelligence and knowledge to benefit the organization and you'll climb the ladder faster, get better protection, and better "working conditions".

Again, unless you're a special case (wanted by law, in need of protection from other street elements, on the run, been a thug for years already, etc.) and can take care of yourself in the hood, don't even think about it.

Nature is my preferred place to be homeless though, and finding water isn't that hard, there's ways. Here in the desert i can find clean water by digging fairly easily. I can hike for days and not have any trouble finding water if you know your earthsmith skills, and how to do what the animals do. Hopefully i can get rid of the last of the little bit of stuff i got this year and further free myself.



posted on May, 6 2008 @ 02:10 PM
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reply to post by jbondo
 



Mentally ill
Drug addict/Alcoholic
Criminal
Don't want to better themselves/IE: Bums
Have problems with adapting to mainstream
Can't hold a job, due in most part to their own issues

So, is he correct?


Yes. Most homeless people do fall into these categories. What difference should that make?

My problems with criminality, drugs and alcohol were born of neccesity. Most people would much rather work a descent job where they weren't looking over their shoulder every minute in fear of prison and death around every corner. But when you have no choice, you adopt the "# it" mentality. The rapper Redman once said, "If you gonna be a monkey, be a motha#in' gorilla." And that pretty much sums up the mentality of thuggin'.

I however did not become blinded by the mentality, and took every opportunity to get out of that lifestyle. I also kicked regular substance abuse fairly easily compared to most, because of my want to change my lifestyle at the first opportunity. And this I was able to do for many years. I "sold out" and even eventually went to work wearing a uniform with a shiny shield pinned to my chest. I've had many jobs over the years, doing whatever I had to do to make sure that I was never homeless again.

And now I am homeless again.


As far as the mentally ill go, it is important to keep in mind that the state used to maintain wards for these poor people. But they shut them all down by time the 90's got rolling. So it's really no wonder the mentally ill wound up living on the streets. Where were they supposed to go? This is no fault of their own, but the fault of the state who would rather spend the money on something else, while getting away with throwing these people out like last week's trash. And who cares? No one cares about them anyway, so who's gonna complain?

As far as not being a "part of the mainstream" there could be many reasons for this, including one's belief system, their mental state, what they have already been forced to endure in life, etc.

Not being able to hold a job due to "their own issues" is a loaded statement. You have to ask yourself where the root of those issues lay. Most often times, you will find that those issues stretch all the way back to childhood, and therefore it is a social problem, not a personal problem.

[edit on 5/6/0808 by jackinthebox]



posted on May, 6 2008 @ 02:33 PM
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reply to post by Maxmars
 


Advice on homeless with children?

Don't wind up homeless. They will take your kids, especially if they aren't teens yet.

I was still a kid when the financial troubles struck, and had to look out for myself and do a lot of things that I was told were wrong when I was growing up. Things that my mother would be severly pissed off about when she found out from time to time. But what could she say really? We had to eat. We had to pay the mortgage.

Bringing other people in dire straits into your household can be a way to get by. We let street kids come stay with us from time to time. Being able to buy and cook in larger bulk certainly lowers everyone's cost of living for example. But you have to be careful with that too. Teens in that position are in a very fickle mindset and can quickly become more of a burden on your household than a contributor. Then of course you feel terrible kicking them out.

I had a gun put to my head by someone who had been a good friend, because he didn't want to leave when I told him to. He had no place to go, so I can understand where he was coming from. But I helped him with a place to stay by putting him in the hospital for a long time. Once he started racking up more bills than what he was contributing, and hanging around the house all day, I knew my friend had to go. And trust me, people like this are the kings and queens of smooth talking. If they feel the hammer coming down, they'll talk themselves into staying for months more, all the while setting you up to get stabbed in the back.

I've got stories I could tell, believe me.



posted on May, 6 2008 @ 04:09 PM
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Originally posted by LostNemesis
reply to post by kthulu
 


I am sure Oregon's bottle return is 5cents, and not 10. Although you probably meant about the bins in front of peoples' homes for the recycle to be picked up every week? That still happens.

I didn't specify an amount. The guy I quoted did.
And I Dont know what you mean by the recycle bin. I am aware of people putting out Recycle bins. What still happens?



That plagarism thing... Isn't there a 10% rule? Your work must be at LEAST 10% different than anothers'

I think its up to a court to decide, IIRC. But it doesn't matter because I said that he DID NOT plagiarize. I' not sure what you mean by it. Did you look at the provided link? maybe you can decide if he plagiarized, but I don't think he did after giving it a cursory glance, and doing a couple of word searches.




And no offense, but these days if someone has kids and ends up homeless, wouldn't they be charged with neglect or something and have the little ones taken away? Seriously, it takes a lot less to get CPS on your arse.

If the child is of a certain age, maybe 15 and up (I'm guessing here because I couldnt find it on a google) Authorities wont do anything about it. Maybe if the kid files charges,I dunno. We need an expert in here to answer that.
Anyone?



posted on May, 6 2008 @ 04:37 PM
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I double posted... Shame on me.


[edit on 5/6/2008 by eye open doors]





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