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Global War: Trend, Accident, or Conspiracy?

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posted on Jun, 5 2008 @ 06:37 AM
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reply to post by sweatmonicaIdo
 


I would most likely be at my home in Christchurch watching some of the continues media coverage that hasn't been seen since 9-11. Assuming sheer volume of traffic doesn't bring the net down amongst the people I would want to touch base with would be Justin and Don .

reply to post by Justin Oldham
 


Speaking generally for a moment . The role of modern day media outlets has become a sort of oxymoron . On the one hand the media has a duty to accurately report events and then there is the fact that private companies have the right to do as they wish within the law . Go chew on that one for a while.

IMO we the people haven't gained anything from the move to 24hr news networks that would report anything . Such coverage hasn't held Bush and co accountable for there actions nor has it led to accurate reporting of the Iraq war .




posted on Jun, 6 2008 @ 03:29 PM
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the sentiments experessed by Xpert11 in thismater reinforce my interest in media credibility. I'll be interested to see the next installment, when S.M. has the time for it. I think it may help us answer this question.



posted on Jun, 6 2008 @ 04:35 PM
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3B is almost finished.

Xpert11 has me thinking real hard. He pretty much made a defining statement regarding the legacy of the 24/7 news service and how it has failed to really live up to any of its purported billings. It'd be real interesting to see some university conduct an independent research program to see what kind of effect 24/7 news has had on society.

In regards to my story, the media is like church. It provided people with information and knowledge of what was going on in the world, as well as advice on how to deal with the situation. It was like a pillar of society. it was part of the problem, but in the long run, it was also part of the solution. It was the one thing people were able to count on when the world was otherwise falling down, as the news kept broadcasting even with riots out in the streets.

My last point of contention is the issue of profit. In a state of complete civil disorder, is it even possible for the media to make a profit? A nuclear stand-off with China is The Story of the Decade so it seems like a real meal ticket. At the same time, I find it hard to believe that profit can be made when the federal reserve closes down and Wall Street suspends trading for the day.



posted on Jun, 6 2008 @ 09:05 PM
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Originally posted by sweatmonicaIdo
My last point of contention is the issue of profit. In a state of complete civil disorder, is it even possible for the media to make a profit? A nuclear stand-off with China is The Story of the Decade so it seems like a real meal ticket. At the same time, I find it hard to believe that profit can be made when the federal reserve closes down and Wall Street suspends trading for the day.


I think you would find that the profiteering would begin in the after mouth of the events you described . It would be in the TV networks to perpetrate the climate of fear that lead to higher ratings . Of course higher ratings mean more revenue for the networks. Look for Hailburton and co to deprive people the right to rebuild there own community's. When this happens mercenary's employed by Hailburton and there cronies will be used to police the streets under the guise of providing security for there pet projects .



posted on Jun, 7 2008 @ 05:45 PM
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I think Xpert11 is right o ntaht point. The military industrial compextw ould run wild in this environment. AFter all, we must be better prepared for the next threat, eh?



posted on Jun, 7 2008 @ 06:34 PM
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There would be a continuing cycle of social unrest . People protesting the presence of the corporate gravy train which be a part of gunpowder that triggers the next ugly incident . After a shooting involving mercenary's and a high death toll amongst protesters. Afterwards there would be further protests or riots . Canada would be flooded with a sudden influx of refuges . Those who stay behind would be caught up in the events described in this thread in one form or another .

Canada would then at some stage during the events described above close the US - Canada border .

[edit on 7-6-2008 by xpert11]



posted on Jun, 7 2008 @ 10:11 PM
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Where would the military-industrial complex get workers? If things get too bad people will not be going to work they will be trying to survive any way possible.

As to the media we could well see the collapse of the mega station news outlet.[i.e. USA Today], and the reinvention of the local run and operated newspapers that are independent of the corporate bias. These would report news and what is going on rather than opinion and bias that most people have come to expect. At the local level it will be closer to those that read it for info. It just will not be cost effective for the larger printing establishments to keep abreast of what is going on. No profit no news.

respectfully

reluctantpawn



posted on Jun, 8 2008 @ 02:42 AM
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reply to post by reluctantpawn
 


The jobs you refer to may be the way a minority can afford food , petrol and other basic items that is unless the market bottoms out of overpriced Oil and food. Talking about a awful moral dilemma a person having to choose between feeding there family or taking a stand against the corporate gravy train .



posted on Jun, 8 2008 @ 06:13 PM
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We may need to hear more from S.M. before we can make more sense out of this. Let's see wnat he says on Monday.



posted on Jun, 10 2008 @ 04:03 PM
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I appreciate the input you have all given on this issue. Clearly, if one thing is for sure, the media will play a VERY big role in the course of this world conflict. Its like the one certainty in such a situation: there is always a reason to show, report, and analyze current events.

Here is Part 3B:

2120 EST, Thursday, December 24, 2009: Christmas is being celebrated within one's local communities, indoors, with an air of gravity, fear, and humility. As they celebrate and socialize, some are unfortunate enough to turn on the TV to see some truly horrifying news.

In Saudi Arabia, firefighters, emergency crews, and American soldiers pull and all-out effort to fight an out-of-control blaze that threatens to engulf the entire Ras Tanura refinery. A huge portion of the refinery has been destroyed, hundreds already killed. It is an absolutely hellish scene and the heat emanating from the fire is so intense it can be felt up to three miles away. Overshadowed by this fire is the suicide bombing of the housing complex that harbors the American troops sent to protect the oil facilities.

The news media, U.S. intelligence services, and the military once again kick it into high gear. The military goes to DEFCON 3, although CENTCOM refuses to go as far as declare a Defense Emergency. Initial coverage and investigation focuses on damage control, but there is no doubt on anyone's mind that this is the work of the Saudi insurgency and Khalid al-Aziz.

2130 EST, Friday, December 25, 2009: A UH-60L Black Hawk on the southern sector of Ras Tanura, conducting its routine night patrol, witnesses the explosions and is subsequently shot down by an RPG. The helicopter crashes 1.5 miles from Ras Tanura, and the surviving crewmembers are immediately ambushed by insurgents. The firefight lasts a little over an hour, but the U.S. troops are overwhelmed. The lone survivor, an embedded reporter from The Associated Press covering the deployment of troops to Saudi Arabia, is taken hostage by the insurgents.

2330 EST, Thursday, December 24, 2009: For the umpteenth time in the last year or so, the Cabinet and the National Security Council reconvene for an emergency meeting on the latest attack against U.S. interests. The prognosis is not good. The Secretary of State reports that this terrorist attack will undoubtedly force Saudi Arabia to reconsider its assistance to the U.S., as well as the sensibility of having U.S. troops on its soil. The Secretary of Energy states that the U.S. is now on its way to an energy crisis of “epic, perilous proportions.” If the U.S. to make it through the winter and into next year, he asserts, the U.S. has to find oil and it has to “get it fast.” Both the Secretary of State and Energy seem to agree that making concessions with oil-rich Canada and Russia is likely to be unsuccessful, and the instability in the Horn of Africa will make it impossible for any sort of abundant and secure flow of oil to be established in the region for years to come.

Meanwhile, the Secretary of Defense, along with the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, state that “U.S. forces are more vulnerable now than ever” and if a military response is in order, the forces in the Persian Gulf must form the core of the response. Obama feels his staff is implying a specific course of action and asks them to be fully honest. The Vice President steps in and says that the U.S. must now make a decision regarding its military presence in the Persian Gulf and that if there is ever a time to implement the strike against Iran, it is now. Phone calls expressing condolences begin to arrive from most every nation around the world, except from Iran, North Korea, and, unusually enough, from Russia. Unusual because even China is decent enough to call.

After the meeting, Obama briefly writes a new journal entry, ending it by stating "Whoever is behind all of this is picking us off one part at a time."

0000 EST, Friday, December 25, 2009: Christmas comes to a screeching halt. People once again gather around televisions or log onto the Internet, following the horror unfolding in Ras Tanura. Others are too overwhelmed to pay attention anymore. Those with family in Saudi Arabia let loose their emotions, all of them quite sure that their family members were involved in the attack. This is a Christmas to remember, and the reasons for it being so are rather forgettable.

0031 EST, Friday, December 25, 2009: Just a little over three hours since the fire began, there are no signs of the fire being brought under control. There is persistent conflict among the authorities, from the Saudi police, to the firefighters, to commander of U.S. troops on the ground, since there is no unified command of the situation. Local hospitals are overwhelmed with casualties and the heat, as well as the possibility of powerful secondary explosions has forced the evacuation of much of the Ras Tanura complex.

1000 EST, Friday, December 25, 2009: After thirteen long hours, the fire has been brought under control at Ras Tanura. The body count is high and the damage excessive. King Abdullah calls for an emergency session to discuss the national security situation as well as the status of the country's oil reserves. The conclusions are quite sobering. Saudi Arabia is forced to accept the fact the insurgency has essentially declared war on the country and that the presence of American troops and civilians on their soil is a major contributing factor to the increasing violence. The Royal family begins to become paranoid, as it has become concerned over dissent within its ranks, as well as the numerous links between the government and the insurgency.

1145 EST, Friday, December 25, 2009: The Cabinet and the NSC reconvenes for an update on the situation. The meeting opens with the casualty figures: 142 American troops have died, 261 injured, and nine missing. The Secretary of State is next, reporting that the Saudi government estimates the damage to Ras Tanura would take 36 months to repair and oil production would take a huge hit. Without citing numbers, the Saudi government has concluded it will not be able to meet global production demands. A global energy crisis is just days away at this point.

The Pentagon, which has been constantly updating and revising its war plan over the past few months, proposes a bold plan: the seizure of the Khuzestan Province of Iran, in addition to the air campaign aimed at toppling the regime. The Secretary of Defense states that Khuzestan “holds more oil than the U.S. will ever need for a while” and that inside of two weeks, enough aircraft, airborne troops, and Marines could be assembled to swoop in and capture the oil fields. Unfortunately, through their latest revision, the Defense Department also reveals that the U.S. has become logistically handicapped and that “no margin for error exists any longer.” The Secretary of Defense echoes the Vice President’s sentiment that if these military forces are ever to be used, the time is now. The fuel shortage, as well as limited supplies has given the U.S. only one shot at making this work. The Secretary of Defense assures the president this is not the execution of a major war plan, which calls for a full-scale invasion of Iran, complete with a post-war occupation. Rather, this is an assault, aimed at eliminating Iran as a regional power, securing energy supplies, and “getting the hell out of there, letting the chips fall where they may in regards to the post-war situation.” The National Security Council collectively concurs, noting that the logistics for a major theater war are non-existent.

With an invasion and major war out of the question, the president asks the CJCS for the latest casualty estimate. It is not much better than a few months before, as casualties are estimated to close to 50,000, especially if biological and chemical weapons are used by Iran. The president expresses concern that China may become involved once again, along with Russia, which gives no upper limit to the number of American and Coalition casualties. The CJCS notes, however, that China is not likely to get involved again, nor is Russia, as both countries would want to assert control of the oil fields.

As the meeting concludes, a phone call arrives from President Medvedev. Everyone is wary of the delayed call from Russia, but the president, decides to accept the call. Medvedev expresses his condolences and offers his help and support in recovering from all the disasters the U.S. has suffered during the past year. Obama replies by saying Russia can start by being more open with the U.S. intelligence community on the missing Russian warhead. Medvedev simply answers by saying "We will deliver to you what we can when we can." Obama and his staff are not pleased with Russia's recent behavior and contemplates what role they may or may not have played in both the missing warhead and the Saudi insurgency's activities.

1200 EST, Friday, December 25, 2009: Half of Christmas day has gone by and every town and city is a ghost town. Everyone is indoors to avoid the cold and have gathered around TV sets to watch continuing coverage of this newest attack on Americans and their interests. They mourn, but in the back of their minds, they also understand the implications of this attack. Gas will be unaffordable and this winter will be long, cold, and incredibly painful. America is at its lowest point ever in history and the average American cannot see what can be done to bring the country out of this mess. Academics and media personalities are hard at work, trying to provide perspective on the problem. For much of it, they have no words.

And Part C will come up in a few days.

[edit on 10-6-2008 by sweatmonicaIdo]



posted on Jun, 10 2008 @ 07:43 PM
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SweatmonicaIdo are you after feedback on your latest instalment ?

Cheers xpert11.



posted on Jun, 10 2008 @ 07:57 PM
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I'm always looking for feedback on my posts. Reactions, assessments, as well as predictions as to what may happen next.



posted on Jun, 10 2008 @ 08:56 PM
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reply to post by sweatmonicaIdo
 


OK IMO unless I have missed something when it comes to the demand for Oil the logical question concerning your scenario is why existing untapped Oil reserves in the US haven't been utilized under some kind of emergency measure .

Has social unrest or political opposition prevented such a measure ?
Going into to much detail would take away from the story but some explanation might be a good idea. Maybe as a writer Justin can give a better perspective on this matter .



posted on Jun, 10 2008 @ 09:22 PM
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That issue will be addressed in the next installment.

However, I will say that while I did not mention it earlier, one of President Obama's initiatives in his first year (and what a first year it has been!) is to increase the Strategic Petroleum Reserves. But their ability to do that will be strained by the Ras Tanura attack.



posted on Jun, 14 2008 @ 02:49 PM
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Originally posted by sweatmonicaIdo
However, I will say that while I did not mention it earlier, one of President Obama's initiatives in his first year (and what a first year it has been!) is to increase the Strategic Petroleum Reserves. But their ability to do that will be strained by the Ras Tanura attack.


that's an important point to leave out. Yo uneed to be thorough and complete with these things. Let's see what happens next.



posted on Jun, 18 2008 @ 09:39 PM
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Are we done with this excersize? Or, is there more? I'm just curious. I'be been working in my yard all day, and I've got a nasty sun burn.



posted on Jun, 18 2008 @ 09:55 PM
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We are nowhere near done. I've just been occupied with Life.

I'm also trying to set the proper sequence of events. Things really start to pick up again, so need to get the timing accurate.



posted on Jun, 19 2008 @ 03:39 AM
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Okay, then. Let's break out the popcorn and talk about this for a while. Until the next installment comes in. What are your thoughts? Can you guess what S.M. has coming next?



posted on Jun, 19 2008 @ 11:25 AM
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That's actually another reason why I have so much time between installments. I'm not sure whether its the small number of readers of this thread or what, but I'm not seeing much discussion on the matter.

What I am looking for is critique of particular trends and themes, as well as paradigms that are at work. Everyone thinks that large-scale warfare is a thing of the past - not necessarily true. They are still likely in today's world, its just that they manifest themselves in a radically different form.

Just an example.



posted on Jun, 19 2008 @ 06:23 PM
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I am sure that there are many readers out here that are monitoring this thread just as I am. I for one am waiting to see how things unfold. So far I am all ears with little to criticize.

respectfully

reluctantpawn



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