Help ATS with a contribution via PayPal:
learn more

Got Beef, read this and you won't want it for dinner

page: 1
0

log in

join

posted on Feb, 27 2004 @ 11:35 AM
link   
Here is the website of the guy who put the last mad cow in the US down. He says that the last test done on any beef in the US was 12/24/03. He also explains how their finding that cow was more or less a fluke. Its an interesting read also check out the broadcast on Whitley Streibers website. www.davelouthan.org...

[Edited on 27-2-2004 by goose]




posted on Feb, 27 2004 @ 11:46 AM
link   
I heard Howard Lyman, an ex-cattle rancher who won't eat meat, one night discussing the ins and outs of it all. And I must say, very disgusting! Check out MadCowboy.com for his story and information.



posted on Feb, 27 2004 @ 11:51 AM
link   
hmmmm, maybe those Hindus' knew something after all.

we're having salmon for dinner, no beef or pork in my body.

but I'm still worried about those chickens.



posted on Feb, 27 2004 @ 11:58 AM
link   
Interesting stuff. Just remember, currently (unless there is a large epidemic), eating beef is like flying in a plane. Your chances are actually lower of dying in a plane, than driving a car.

In this case, chicken has salmonella and now bird flu (in china). More people die from chicken in the world than beef. It's a fact!


Can read more here: Avoid Mad-Cow? I'd Rather Avoid Chicken...



posted on Feb, 27 2004 @ 12:17 PM
link   
Lets not even begin to discuss the processing of pork and hot dogs to boot.



regards
seekerof



posted on Feb, 27 2004 @ 12:19 PM
link   
I will take my chances and continue eating beef.



posted on Feb, 27 2004 @ 12:23 PM
link   

Originally posted by Seekerof
Lets not even begin to discuss the processing of pork and hot dogs to boot.



regards
seekerof

Right! The government ALLOWS X-amount (can't remember the exact measurement) of rodent hairs and fly wings per pound of hotdogs.

Well, growing up on a ranch gave me a different perspective. Hotdogs, well...yeah as a kid. But mainly, I asked my mom why didn't we eat that stuff much.
She just laughed and said...""that's what we fed the dogs".

There you go....



posted on Feb, 27 2004 @ 12:33 PM
link   
In this case, ignorance truly is bliss.....so I'll continue to be ignorant of such things, and chow down on my burger, thanks all the same.....



posted on Feb, 27 2004 @ 12:51 PM
link   

Originally posted by Gazrok
In this case, ignorance truly is bliss.....so I'll continue to be ignorant of such things, and chow down on my burger, thanks all the same.....


Same here. The chances aren't all that high that you will die from tainted meat...so i'll take my chances...



posted on Feb, 27 2004 @ 01:25 PM
link   
All you guys eating beef or four legged meat, see if you're around in 20 years. Thinking of having kids? Don't. You won't be around.

It's like this: Sure, there's a small chance you'll get Mad Cow if you eat meat. But it's cumulative. And you eat meat several times a week. It all adds up. I don't even need to give you guys a shovel.



posted on Feb, 27 2004 @ 01:37 PM
link   

Originally posted by ktprktpr
All you guys eating beef or four legged meat, see if you're around in 20 years. Thinking of having kids? Don't. You won't be around.

It's like this: Sure, there's a small chance you'll get Mad Cow if you eat meat. But it's cumulative. And you eat meat several times a week. It all adds up. I don't even need to give you guys a shovel.

Stay away from the fatty cuts and stick to the more "muscle" cuts (that's the less marbled look to you novices). Yes, hamberger is fatty meat, so go with steak or roast with a minimal amout of "marble". Try to go with range-fed beef is possible (they mark them at the store, but sometimes is a bit more $$). Personally, well...my family ranches so I have my own protections, but for you store buyers, just watch the cuts.

Also, the nice shiny pink meat? Yeah, that's dyed red/pink color so you will come back and buy more meat. REAL beef is more natural brownish, so if you can get meat from a butcher shop over a large grocery chain, the better off you will be.

And like I said earlier, you can drive a car everyday and fly a plane everyday. Your chances of death are greater in the car.



posted on Feb, 27 2004 @ 02:04 PM
link   
Bah, it doesn't make the cow taste less good. I'm gonna keep doing what I always do.



posted on Feb, 27 2004 @ 02:06 PM
link   
I have an extremely good relationship with my local butcher, who gets all of his meat from small, organic, independent farms. It lacks almost all of the risks that normally come with buying meat in a grocery store. It is also among the most fantastic meat you can buy.

I encourage you to seek out a local butcher, find his supplier, and see how the animals are raised. Once you have really GOOD meat, you'll never go back to that Jewel crap.



posted on Feb, 27 2004 @ 05:36 PM
link   
The disease that is mad cow disease (sorry don't know proper name for it) can lie dormant in your system for 10 years before you actually come down with it. The fact that nobody's looking for it is scary too especially when you think of the consequences and the fact that this cow was accidentally found, had she gotten off the truck and walked to the pen she would never have gotten in with the downers. We should all be more concerned we are feeding this stuff to our children. Japan tests every cow at slaughter, yes it will be more expensive, but I would rather eat less beef and pay more for it than worry about whether what I'm eating is going to kill me.



posted on Feb, 27 2004 @ 05:44 PM
link   
I went to a huge concert and these hindu guys were passing out DVDS that showed how cows and other animals get slaughtered. It was really disgusting. Needless to say Im a vegetarian.

Also, 40 percent of chickens have luekemia. Chickens arent healthy either. I also saw a dvd of chicken slaughters. U2U me if u wanna kno the disgusting details. lol.



posted on Feb, 27 2004 @ 06:09 PM
link   

Originally posted by goose
The disease that is mad cow disease (sorry don't know proper name for it) can lie dormant in your system for 10 years before you actually come down with it. The fact that nobody's looking for it is scary too especially when you think of the consequences and the fact that this cow was accidentally found, had she gotten off the truck and walked to the pen she would never have gotten in with the downers. We should all be more concerned we are feeding this stuff to our children. Japan tests every cow at slaughter, yes it will be more expensive, but I would rather eat less beef and pay more for it than worry about whether what I'm eating is going to kill me.

BSE is a Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy (TSE), a family of similar diseases that may infect certain species of animals and people such as scrapie in sheep and goats, bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in cattle, chronic wasting disease (CWD) in deer and elk, and Creutzfeldt-Jacob disease (CJD) in people.

A variant form of CJD (vCJD) is believed to be caused by eating contaminated beef products from BSE-affected cattle. To date, there have been 155 confirmed and probable cases of vCJD worldwide among the hundreds of thousands of people that may have consumed BSE-contaminated beef products. The one reported case of vCJD in the United States is in a young woman who contracted the disease while residing in the UK and developed symptoms after moving to the U.S.

How about some Japan history for you:
The first cow to test positive for the disease outside of Europe was discovered on a farm near Tokyo in September 2001, starting a panic that thinned crowds at restaurants, left store shelves cluttered with unsold beef and sent farmers' profits plummeting as much as 80 percent.

A government panel investigating the outbreak heaped blame on regulators, revealing the Agriculture Ministry had failed to heed a warning by the World Health Organization in 1996 to ban meat-and-bone meal. Instead of a ban - a measure taken by the United States in 1997 - the ministry initially issued only a lukewarm recommendation that cattlemen refrain from using it.

Stung by criticism, Japan finally banned the suspect feed and announced a month after the outbreak it would screen all cattle bound for human consumption. The new policy wasn't cheap. Japan had to equip about 120 meat hygiene-inspection centers with testing kits imported from France and increase the number of inspectors, spending about $65 million in the first two years of the program just on testing and upgrading facilities, according to the Health Ministry.

Authorities also spent millions more recalling meat and destroying cattle. Doing the same in the United States, where just 20,000 animals were tested for the disease last year, would be even costlier.

Just wanted to provide the facts.






top topics



 
0

log in

join