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Structures on MARS

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posted on Apr, 30 2008 @ 03:49 AM
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enlarge bottom side of image

image link: www.msss.com...



[edit on 30-4-2008 by zero7]




posted on Apr, 30 2008 @ 04:11 AM
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The Plains of Central Terra Meridiani
MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-229, 22 May 2000



This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a dark, relatively smooth plain in the central Terra Meridiani region of Mars. The larger circular features in the upper three-quarters of the image are thought to be the locations of buried craters formed by meteorite impact. The cluster of smaller ciruclar features in the bottom quarter of the scene represent a field of craters formed either by simultaneous impact of many meteorites, or the re-impact of material thrown from a much, much larger nearby crater as it formed. The dark material covering these plains includes an abundance of the iron oxide mineral, hematite, that was detected by the MGS Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES). During late 1999, the "hematite region," as it came to be called, emerged along with the Libya Montes as one of the top two choices of landing sites for the now-canceled Mars Surveyor 2001 lander. This image, illuminated by sunlight from the left, covers an area 3 kilometers (1.9 miles) wide and 19 kilometers (11.8 miles) long. The scene is located near 2.2°S, 3.7°W and was acquired on August 19, 1999.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL/Malin Space Science Systems


[edit on 30/4/2008 by internos]



posted on Apr, 30 2008 @ 08:03 AM
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He is referring to the structure in the picture he posted. It is zoomed in on what he posted... looks like a very symmetrical object to me.



posted on Apr, 30 2008 @ 08:06 AM
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reply to post by bigshow
 

Yes NOW i see it, thanks:
but he has EDITED the message after my post:
originally, in the OP there was ONLY a link to
this image
and it was a little bit too hard to spot it




[edit on 30/4/2008 by internos]



posted on Apr, 30 2008 @ 08:32 AM
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Usually I am not impressed and do not see what others see when they post pictures of "structures" on Mars or the moon for that matter.

But I am slightly intruiged by the symmetry of this thing. Any ideas, Internos, on what this is? Has it been discussed before?


Rush



posted on Apr, 30 2008 @ 08:45 AM
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reply to post by hsur2112
 

Hi hsur2112!

I don't recall to have seen this one before.
I've noticed many squared image artifactings all over the image, but what we are looking at looks definately interesting to me.

This is a nice find, i'm going to star and flag this one.
I'm searching the MSSS MOC catalogue, hoping to find other images of the same area.




[edit on 30/4/2008 by internos]



posted on Apr, 30 2008 @ 09:24 AM
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Is there any type of software out there to map it in 3D and tilt it to get a side view like google earth does?



posted on Apr, 30 2008 @ 09:33 AM
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I've found the same formation on
MOC narrow-angle image M19-00846
Monitor crater wind streaks in Sinus Meridiani


www.msss.com...

[edit on 30/4/2008 by internos]



posted on Apr, 30 2008 @ 09:34 AM
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Thanks Internos. Hope all is well!
And thanks for checking on this image.

I've probably missed the fair share of Mars anomolies pics. I've just seen very few Mars images that pique my reasonably skeptical side. I usually shy away quickly from those threads because I have no experience with image analysis and can only offer my own common sense, which most ats-er's have no interest in. hehe

Upon first glance, this "thingy" is just plain odd and unlike other Mars images I've seen posted, doesn't require the OP to draw nice little lines to help others see what they are seeing.

Ok, I'm going on and on, so I will look forward to your findings.


Rush



Edit to add: Reading your post now.

[edit on 30-4-2008 by hsur2112]



posted on Apr, 30 2008 @ 09:39 AM
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reply to post by internos
 


Wow, your image posted next to the OP's doesn't look quite as symmetrical.



posted on Apr, 30 2008 @ 09:42 AM
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I'd like to find some more high res images of that particular spot. I have a feeling that because of the low resolution, and even lower when zooming, it is appearing as a square object, when in fact it is a normal round crater.



posted on Apr, 30 2008 @ 10:45 AM
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reply to post by sensfan
 


Of course you are right: the lower is the resolution, the more a shape whatsoever get closer to a square/rectangle.
In the specific image of the OP, MOC2-229, there's also another issue that i've mentioned before:
www.msss.com...
there are image artifactings that we can see all over the image: here

i've cropped another area from the same image:
there are a lot of vertical and horizontal stipes, and many shapes, including crater ejecta, have a "squared" appearance that doesn't make sense: many formations appear to be "cutted" and always in vertical/horizontal way.
This doesn't happen in M19-00846.
www.msss.com...

Hence, the image # 1 is LESS "reliable" than image # 2.
Regarding the availability of more images, here

the cross indicates the location of the images in question (the red stripes are the MOC images, some of them are overlapped), and they have all (more or less) the same resolution.
I've found another image,
MOC narrow-angle image M04-01900
Region of secondary cluster swarm
www.msss.com...
of the same formation (today we're lucky
)



I've also checked the availability of images from HIRISE,
but in according to what we see here

it hasn't still been covered.
So far, all that we have are these three images.

I'll download the RAW images hoping to get some better shots.


[edit on 30/4/2008 by internos]



posted on Apr, 30 2008 @ 11:23 AM
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Originally posted by QBSneak000
Is there any type of software out there to map it in 3D and tilt it to get a side view like google earth does?


There are several ways to do this. A while back Keith Laney was using a method he called 'shape from shading' where he extrapolated a 3-D image from a 2-D image (Surface features on Mars actually).

I believe that Photoshop has a feature where you can change the plane of perspective, but I'm not a pro with that software.

ArMaP recommended to me a good freeware called GIMP:
www.gimp.org...

And this program also offers you the feature of rotating the perspective.
It's not true 3-D by any means, and it doesn't give you a 3-D 'Map' of the area, but it will allow you to alter your perspective angle, and it's a good tool to use when trying to get an idea of what you're looking at in an image.

I'm with Sensfan, I'd love to see this feature in higher res. Internos, have you checked the Russian Mars imagery yet? Perhaps this feature was imaged decades ago by Phobos?

I tried digging through the MRO Images, 2 cameras on that mission, the MARCI and the CTX. Neither seem to have very many images up... Any other cameras I'm missing?

-WFA



posted on Apr, 30 2008 @ 11:31 AM
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I'm sorry but the picture doesn't really give us much of an idea. I mean look at it, it's like taken directly from an 8-bit Nintendo game. But as usual, we can sit here and play a game of Pictionary with what looks to be Mario's Castle.



posted on Apr, 30 2008 @ 11:39 AM
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Originally posted by WitnessFromAfar

I'm with Sensfan, I'd love to see this feature in higher res. Internos, have you checked the Russian Mars imagery yet? Perhaps this feature was imaged decades ago by Phobos?

-WFA

I'd love it too, as i guess ALL would do

No, i havent' checked the russian images because they are far lower-res than these ones.
I'm checking the MSSS images archive right now.



[edit on 30/4/2008 by internos]



posted on Apr, 30 2008 @ 12:28 PM
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reply to post by internos
 


Hi internos, what I see is structures and buildings on all of the perimeters of the so called craters.

The bottom right crater contains a block structure on the craters floor to the right with a shinny dome on top of the block looking structure. In the middle of floor of the crater is an X and humanoid face camouflaged in the wavy patterned area.

To the top of this particular crater are dark buildings I call the twin towers just to the right of the top arrow point about 3/4 inch on the perimeter. Rik Riley



posted on Apr, 30 2008 @ 06:05 PM
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reply to post by zero7
 


Flagged and Starred !!

Symmetrical structure is symmetrical, thus amazing it is. +10 Internets awarded for this great find. UNDENIABLE TRUTH FOR THE MASSES !! (Cause I already knew aliens lived on mars a long time ago due to my friendship with numerous alien entities.)



posted on Apr, 30 2008 @ 06:21 PM
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reply to post by Pagani
 


Hi Pagani, can you elaborate on the alien entities you are in contact with and if these entities are from Mars, our Solar System or a constellation in our Milky Way? I have known for many years Mars harbored lifeforms. Rik Riley



posted on Apr, 30 2008 @ 06:21 PM
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Originally posted by internos

I've noticed many squared image artifactings all over the image



Yea looking at the original image in photoshop, even without zooming in, shows alot of squared off artifacts, and pixelation.

I'm a bit hesitant to jump to any conclusions on this on however, because on the the lower angle shot you post internos, most of that pixelation is gone, however, our "struture" remains, extremely squared off, and has very straight lines for a natural formation.

But again, It looks more like pixelation to me, and not an artificial created structure.

I'm not an image expert by any stretch of the imagination unfortunately. I barely just know the basics of how to even use photshop as it is. So this is just an average persons point of veiw as to what I see.

It is definitely a good find OP
, and deserves some looking into for sure. I'm sure there are some very talented image and photo people here, (internos being one of them), who can look further into this , and hopefully come to a conclusion.

It's be good to hear some other opinions from people who have some experience in analyzing images like these. Hopefully that will happen, because at first glance I was like WOW!, then when I gave it a closer look in PS, I saw alot of similiar anomolies, so I was kinda dissapointed after that.

But hopefully the image "experts" here will give it a good look, and offer thier opinions.

In any event, good find once again OP, and excellent work following it up internos, I'll definitely be keeping an eye on this thread to hopefully hear what some others think of this anomoly.

So starred and flagged it is.



posted on Apr, 30 2008 @ 06:28 PM
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Not a bunch of skid marks or dents from bouncing. Looks like they got landed ok. I wonder who will be the first to go after and recover this craft....




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