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Japanese royal tombs examined

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posted on Apr, 29 2008 @ 05:58 PM
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Tombs of the emperors

Recently archaeologists were allowed inside the kofun tomb of Empress Jingu—the first time that scholars had been permitted inside a Japanese royal tomb outside of an official excavation. The rare visit offers experts hope that other closely guarded graves, including Nintoku's, might soon be open to independent study.



Question why aren't the massive Japanese royal tombs - one nearly the size of Giza. At 1,594 feet (486 meters) long, the mausoleum is the largest in Japan. Not part of feverish conspiracy and fringe theory like the pyramids?




posted on May, 1 2008 @ 06:39 PM
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Originally posted by Hanslune
Question why aren't the massive Japanese royal tombs - one nearly the size of Giza. At 1,594 feet (486 meters) long, the mausoleum is the largest in Japan. Not part of feverish conspiracy and fringe theory like the pyramids?


Because none were built before history. There is a record of who built them, who resides within, and other records spanning the duration of their existence.

The same cannot be said fully about the pyramids - there is some doubt as to when they were built and by whom, though there is much consensus. The records, at any rate, are less pristine.

Is that a good answer? [smile]



posted on May, 1 2008 @ 06:49 PM
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there are a lot of local (Japanese) folklores and myths about these tombs though



posted on May, 1 2008 @ 07:11 PM
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reply to post by IchiNiSan
 


I would imagine! Tombs always develop "baggage" within the local community. At least they did so back when there was more superstition about death and so on.

Thanks for the info!



posted on May, 1 2008 @ 07:23 PM
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consider that we live in a highly religious world, then it won't be surprising to hear "baggage" about any kinds of modern topics (either it be a new technology or new construction project) , just look around us in ATS
In China for example, the local community is creating a hugeload of folklore and myths for th Three Gorges Dam too!



posted on May, 1 2008 @ 07:31 PM
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Originally posted by IchiNiSan
there are a lot of local (Japanese) folklores and myths about these tombs though


Howdy IcniNiSan

Could you give us an example?



posted on May, 1 2008 @ 07:41 PM
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reply to post by Hanslune
 




In the past the agency has refused access to the tomb on the grounds that the boat to cross its moat is too old and unsafe.


Fair enough, sounds legitimate, I mean anyone can equate with that boats don't come cheap afterall


They like to tease don't they, I want to see the wonderfull works of art and grave goods produced by the best artisans of the period, just a few photos that would do.

Ah well..sits back in chair and relaxes again.



posted on May, 1 2008 @ 08:16 PM
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The Japanese bureaucracy wishes to avoid the preceived embarassment of facts not in line with the current story about the origins of the Imperial family. The present Emperor is the 125 (126?) in the dynasty



posted on May, 1 2008 @ 08:20 PM
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reply to post by Amaterasu
 


Yeah, well, you would say that, wouldn't you?

Thanks again for the rice, Amaterasu. Good to see deities embracing modern technology.



posted on May, 1 2008 @ 08:30 PM
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Originally posted by Hanslune
The Japanese bureaucracy wishes to avoid the preceived embarassment of facts not in line with the current story about the origins of the Imperial family. The present Emperor is the 125 (126?) in the dynasty


Care to elaborate on that?

What facts do you think are out there that would cause embarrassment?



posted on May, 1 2008 @ 09:39 PM
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Oh sorry

That the Emperor descendents came from Korea. Koreans are considered second class and having the Emperor's ancestor come from there would be embarassing. Of course this idea is well known to the general public but the Imperial bureaucracy continues to follow this tact. It's also part of the tombs being religious sites and they don't want them to be profaned.



posted on May, 1 2008 @ 10:20 PM
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reply to post by Hanslune
 


It's strange. I never hear anything negative from Japanese sources regarding Korean links to the Imperial line. It always seems to come from non-Japanese sources. Why is that?

There's a ton of information about it - it's well documented, going back centuries. Akihito, the current emperor, has both written about and spoken publicly about links to Korea in his own family tree. The high school history textbook I'm reading (good study material - my Japanese needs a lot of work) goes into it all in a bit of detail. Plus, there's the whole archaeology element that shows quite clearly that the Japanese came from somewhere else. It makes absolutely no odds here, in much the same way that Germans in the British monarchy's line are treated. I can't see any reason why that point would be seen as anything more than historical fact - far from a public embarrassment. The "second class" comment is a little harsh, in my opinion (ie. that of a foreigner living in Japan for 6 years). At times, Koreans living in Japan are seen as Fifth Columnists, but for the most part - in my personal experience - there's no real man-on-the-street animosity.

I think your second point has a bit more weight. In this part of the world, there are not many sites of historical importance that have not been looted for western museums. Take a look at China. The original act to protect these sites (and others) was done in large part in response to that trend. Currently, there are ongoing issues at a number of other sites around the country - where well meaning archaeologists and curators have gone in to sites and inadvertently damaged them, or bungled restorations, and so forth. from that standpoint, it does make sense to limit the amount of intrusive research to the site - not for what they will find, but to prevent damage from being done. That's my take on it, anyway.



posted on May, 1 2008 @ 10:34 PM
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Good points, I have a Japanese background also.



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