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Police Raid Suspected Meth House, Only Find Fish Tank

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posted on Apr, 29 2008 @ 06:09 PM
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Imagine if you will...,

you are startled by the forced entry of people bearing weapons. They demand you present you identification.

Is that really OK? REALLY?

Now add this, you neighbors are alerted to the ruckus, your children are near to peeing themselves in fear,

Is 'They are just doing their job.' supposed to be good enough?

How about;

-They are only protecting us.
-They are faced with great danger in doing their job, they have to be this way for their own safety.
-Ooops?

I think the realists out there will not deny these people whatever a jury believes is just compensation for the error in judgment involved. (Assuming technicalities force administrative adjudication, in which case anything goes - statistically in favor of the police)

For the finale:

You had a bad day
you've had an attempted break in already
you were having a nightmare about hunting with Cheney
you just quit smoking
these guys look inbred
you cant understand sh*t of what they are yelling at the top of there lungs as they burst in

You grab a bat, gun, knife, rolled up newspaper,
or maybe you just instinctively drop one with a right cross,

Where do we send the flowers? At best - You WILL be beaten and receive significant injuries as only police know how.

It is natural, as in human nature, to establish an area for oneself as a sanctuary or home, a place where we can believe and expect we are safe from threat. It should be reasonable to expect that any sudden intrusion or violent entrance might naturally prompt a response that is NOT open to debate as to severity ... nature drives us to protect ourselves and loved ones - Peace keepers have to accept this reality or the must suffer the responsibility of precipitating tragic consequences, they got lucky this time.




posted on Apr, 29 2008 @ 09:30 PM
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I'd really hope that they reserve the raids (which I'd expect are expensive to carry out) for when they're sure they need them.

At least go on a little more than someone's word. It's too ripe for abuse. I mean, what if someone had a grudge against their neighbor because they didn't trim their lawn or left their garbage cans on the curb for too long after trash day.

Seriously, I'm scared.

I try to avoid pissing off my neighbors anyway, since it's sort of rude and antisocial, but should I now be afraid that if I piss off my neighbors they'll call the police and complain about a 'funny smell' leading to them assaulting me?



posted on Apr, 30 2008 @ 12:21 PM
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reply to post by The Nighthawk
 


I love your logic.
The officers in charge of this operation should be summarily fired and stripped of their pensions and the city and the department forced to pay millions in damages.

You would have the tax payers pay millions for this. In other words the people of the community should be held responsible for a multi million dollar payment.

The officers in charge of this operation should be summarily fired and stripped of their pensions.

How are you proposing to get people to become officers if they know that should an error occur then they will be immediately fired and lose all their pension?

I do think that a mistake was made. But remember, no one was injured (think goodness) There should be an investigation into this incident to determine how to avoid mistakes like this in the future. If it is justified, the person in charge should be demoted. Some compensation should be provided to the people whose house was targeted falsely but once again, I don't think that it should be a multi million dollar award paid for by the tax payers.



posted on Apr, 30 2008 @ 01:02 PM
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Originally posted by Wildbob77

I love your logic.
The officers in charge of this operation should be summarily fired and stripped of their pensions and the city and the department forced to pay millions in damages.


Good. Because it's sound.


You would have the tax payers pay millions for this. In other words the people of the community should be held responsible for a multi million dollar payment.


No, I would have city officials, especially those in charge of police operations, held responsible for paying out of their own pockets. If the people of the community foot the bill from their taxes the ones who should be holding the cops' leashes don't learn nuthin'. The people at the top of the food chain need to feel the pain for an outrage like this.


The officers in charge of this operation should be summarily fired and stripped of their pensions.

How are you proposing to get people to become officers if they know that should an error occur then they will be immediately fired and lose all their pension?


Where the Hell do you work? That's how it is for most Americans!! If I made some blunder on a scale like this today, I wouldn't have a job tomorrow. No investigation, no questions, nothing. Too bad, so sad. Should have been a little more careful.


I do think that a mistake was made. But remember, no one was injured (think goodness)


Which doesn't matter to me one damn bit. What's at stake here is the fundamental right to privacy and safety in one's own home. The fact it didn't turn into tragic statistics is not important here. Any idiot who watches "Law & Order" can figure out a cop needs to verify everything they can before making such a drastic move, and the methods for doing so aren't that hard!! All it would have taken was 24 hours' patience while the house is staked out and observed. Why are police making such a huge rush to action without checking the facts?


There should be an investigation into this incident to determine how to avoid mistakes like this in the future.


More training. Stronger oversight. Better supervision. Higher standards of behaviour. Police are no longer respected members of the community in America, and incidents like this illustrate the reason why. If they want respect again, they need to be worthy of it.


If it is justified, the person in charge should be demoted.


Demotion isn't enough justice for what should be painfully obvious, is a glaring case of police misconduct. Someone could easily have died here. Someone needs to fall for this and HARD. Examples need to be made to ensure policies are put in place and followed to the letter.

A lot of people on these boards have a very authoritarian bent, justifying people being tazed, beaten, handcuffed, and arrested for the crime of speaking up when it's inconvenient. It's time for the PEOPLE to be authoritarian in dealing with public servants.


Some compensation should be provided to the people whose house was targeted falsely but once again, I don't think that it should be a multi million dollar award paid for by the tax payers.


I agree the taxpayers aren't responsible and shouldn't pay from city funds. But people from the police cheif to the mayor should be paying for it out of their own pockets. Maybe when the people at the top lose something important to them they'll have a better understanding of what it's like when something is taken from the "little people". And make no mistake--something was taken from these folks--their rights, their personal security, their privacy, and their peace of mind. Nothing can truly get that back for them--but making city officials give up some of their personal wealth as punitive damages is a great start.



posted on Apr, 30 2008 @ 01:30 PM
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Originally posted by Wildbob77
reply to post by The Nighthawk
 


You would have the tax payers pay millions for this. In other words the people of the community should be held responsible for a multi million dollar payment.


Actually, it would be the taxpayers who decide just how expensive this mistake was. The money can come out of the executive budget for police administrators over time. Maybe then they'll learn to reign in the 'cowboys' appropriately. Meanwhile, no Xmas bonus for you!



How are you proposing to get people to become officers if they know that should an error occur then they will be immediately fired and lose all their pension?


An error is when you misspell someone's name, you step on someone's foot, or even when you fire a round at a child with a toy gun. They are 'trained' remember, this is PART of the job, and doing it in accordance with the law is NOT optional. Should they be immune from repercussions? Have you ever seen a police officer who is immune from repercussions? We don't WANT those kind of police out there.


[edit on 30-4-2008 by Maxmars]



posted on Apr, 30 2008 @ 06:30 PM
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Originally posted by Wildbob77
I think that a mistake was made.
The city repaired their door.
Perhaps a small fee should be paid for the inconvenience of the people.

If the couple sued, and I were on the jury, I would not agree to a big financial award. Just because the police made a mistake, I don't think that it means that you've won the lottery.

That's just my personal opinion.


What about the physical pain and suffering of the people who were slammed to the floor and handcuffed? Those same people who suffered the trauma of having a gun to their heads in fear of their lives? The woman already has a bad back. I am sure she and her husband were hurting for at least a few days afterwards. And this happened in their own home. How are they going to sleep soundly in their own beds, not knowing when they'll be attacked again? Perhaps if you have a cop throw you around some and make threats against you when you're minding your own business, you'll know what it feels like. It's been almost 9 years since it happened to me, and I still get uneasy when I'm near a cop. I sure don't trust them. My kid doesn't either. Tell me, what right a cop has to traumatize a 3 year old kid? My little girl was only 3 years old and had panic attacks for years after that incident anytime she saw anyone she thought was a cop. She still gets uneasy.



posted on Apr, 30 2008 @ 07:03 PM
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reply to post by Jessicamsa
 


Wow. I keep hearing these accounts more frequently now. I'm sorry you and your child had to endure that. I know there are some pretty nasty operators amongst our police, but I would hope you can still muster enough hope to believe that many of them are fine people who can be very kind. Try not to embrace the fear, it's a trap and sometimes takes us places we don't really want to go. I would hate to think that your apprehension could be misread by some policeman and precipitate the whole nightmare over again.

Sorry, I didn't mean to wax parental.



posted on Apr, 30 2008 @ 08:20 PM
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I had a friend once who sold pot out of his house. It was only small amounts, probably no more than a few ounces in the house at a time. There was a kid who got picked up for holding a dime sack that had been sold to him, and to get out of trouble, he pointed the police in the direction of this friend's house.

Well, they decided to bust in on the house raid style. Well, they announced themselves outside the first door, but not at the second apartment door, and the brother of one of the guys who live there grabbed a bokken and attacked the first guy into the apartment. Luckily he was wrestled to the ground and arrested instead of shot.

In this case, the raid was warranted (although the cost of the raid likely exceeded the amount of cash and drugs seized). And I'm glad as hell that the officer who was attacked had enough sense to tackle rather than shoot or use a taser. He was charged with assault on an officer, but the charges were dropped when it was revealed that the police didn't identify themselves at a point that he could hear them.



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