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Police Raid Suspected Meth House, Only Find Fish Tank

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posted on Apr, 29 2008 @ 01:38 PM
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Police Raid Suspected Meth House, Only Find Fish Tank


www.kare11.com

Brooklyn Park police were looking for a meth lab, but they found a fish tank and the chemicals needed to maintain it.

And a few hours later, when the city sent a contractor to fix the door the police had smashed open Monday afternoon, it was obvious the city was trying to fix a mistake.
It happened while Kathy Adams was sleeping.

"And the next thing I know, a police officer is trying to get me out bed," she said.

Adams, a 54-year-old former nurse who said she suffers from a bad back caused by a patient who attacked her a few years ago, was handcuffed. So was her 49-year-old husband.
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Apr, 29 2008 @ 01:38 PM
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LOL...More "gung-ho, charge in, intimidate the citizens first, ask questions later" crap from the Po-po...

Does it ever occur to these people PRIOR to smashing up someone's house and violating them to perhaps do a little DETECTIVE work to follow up on a "tip" from someone, before going berzerk?

Awesome way to "fight the war on drugs" there guys!

I hope these people sue the crap out of that department and the city.


Adams is looking for a lawyer.

"I could say that about my neighbor - I smelled something when I went in their house," she said. "Does that make it right for them to go in there and break the door down and cuff you? I think not!"

Police say the detective who asked for the search warrant is an 8 ½-year veteran, but he just started working in the drug task force.



www.kare11.com
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Apr, 29 2008 @ 02:43 PM
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I hope they sue the pants off that police department, the judge that issued the bogus warrant, and the cops that failed to check out the tip adequately. Then go after the morons who hire these thugs to intimidate us in the name of "law and order"!



posted on Apr, 29 2008 @ 02:53 PM
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I honestly don't see the problem here.

Sure it's a shame these innocent people were bothered, but these officers were only doing their jobs. Obviously whatever "tip" they got was wrong, but I'm sure they checked into it before busting down someones door. In any case we don't have all the information to make that decision right now, so blaming the officers seems a little out of line to me.

Once an investigation is done and we find these officers didn't follow procedure or were out of line, then we can search for justice. Until then, I'm not going to rush to judgment and point the finger at anyone.



posted on Apr, 29 2008 @ 03:02 PM
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This happened to me once many years ago.
Based on Testimony from some Ex-Friend of my brother's.
He "ratted" out as many people as he could think of, because he was in BIG trouble.

He told the cops we were selling pounds of Marijuana from my house.
We were watching Hockey, and drinking Iced tea (not even a beer).

When Guys in black busted in our door, with a battering Ram. 10 guys in black clothes, and black facemasks..

We were handcuffed, thrown on the floor, with shotguns to our heads.

they searched the place, and I could hear them upstairs saying " is this the right house?, is this the right house?"..

They found nothing, not a thing..except, just as they were leaving, one of the guys held up a little pipe that did NOT belong to my brother, or me. WE just looked at each other as we lie on the floor, shaking our heads..
Whats this? he asked...
I said, I dunno, ask "Ken" the guy that lied to you about my house.

They tried to frame us..Our lawyer got the charges dropped..

We grew up in that town..We knew everyone..Everyone knew what happened to us.

That last time I saw that "Ken" guy..Which was just a few weeks later, before his trial, he was on Crutches, and I have no idea why.



posted on Apr, 29 2008 @ 03:10 PM
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ahahahaha once again cops just show they cant do a job well. Keep up the great work cops.



posted on Apr, 29 2008 @ 03:15 PM
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Originally posted by nyk537
I honestly don't see the problem here.

Sure it's a shame these innocent people were bothered, but these officers were only doing their jobs. Obviously whatever "tip" they got was wrong, but I'm sure they checked into it before busting down someones door.


Are you on meth? You don't see the problem with innocent people not being secure in their persons and dwellings? Ever hear of the 4th Amendment?

This is a direct result of the bogus "war on (some) drugs" that seeks to justify every action of the police against the people as a means to an end!

This is America! Wake up everybody, before your door is kicked down next!



posted on Apr, 29 2008 @ 03:20 PM
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Ooops!!!

What if this turned out very wrong, like in the case of that little old lady who unloaded a clip at the cops when they unjustly broke down her door?

You'd figure that with examples like that, they'd be a bit more careful to properly investigate.

Now I'm scared for myself! I have a large turtle tank and I use vinegar and various other chemicals to clean and maintain the tank. I use about a gallon and a half going through my cleaning routine once a month. I wonder if someone happened to catch the scent while passing by, or seeing the bottles if I'd end up with a shotgun to the head while they search the house.

I'm genuinely scared for my life. The last thing I need is some Barney Fife busting down my door for no reason.



posted on Apr, 29 2008 @ 03:27 PM
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I think some of you misunderstand where I'm coming from here.

I'm not defending the police officers actions here, but they were just doing their jobs. My stance is that we should wait for all the information to come out before we judge these officers and what they did. For all we know they had some very reliable information that checked out perfectly that just turned out dead wrong in the end; there is now way to tell right now.

This very easily could have been a large drug bust and these officers would be commended for their actions. We can't just assume they are corrupt or ill informed.



posted on Apr, 29 2008 @ 03:38 PM
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Perhaps the problem is that in 'doing their jobs' the police did not have any mandate to verify their source, or even attempt to knock on the door. This is (or was) a commonly held 'commandment' obeyed by the peace keeping authorities anywhere in this country.

Also, 'in doing there jobs' they arrested a person roused from sleep, despite the lack of ANY corroborating 'evidence'.

The trivialities of 'civil rights' are there because the cost of error is too high, and peace and safety within one's own place of residence is not a 'gift' it is a right (or so that "G-Damned piece of paper" says.)

How are we to pursue a life of peace if we cannot expect that peace to be respected by those who are duly sworn to protect it? What kind of peace would that be? And people wonder why so many keep weapons in their homes. Silly, really.



posted on Apr, 29 2008 @ 03:43 PM
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Originally posted by nyk537
My stance is that we should wait for all the information to come out before we judge these officers and what they did. For all we know they had some very reliable information that checked out perfectly that just turned out dead wrong in the end; there is now way to tell right now.



Fish tank chemicals?

Reliable evidence?

Sorry, I'm not understanding where you're coming from. Either the judge that signed the warrant or the team that executed the warrant or the cops that got the warrant are culpable in this.



posted on Apr, 29 2008 @ 03:49 PM
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Oh man, what are the rest of us with fish tanks and the chemicals to maintain them supposed to do!? LOL

This story is funny and sad, at the same time.



posted on Apr, 29 2008 @ 03:50 PM
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Originally posted by nyk537
I honestly don't see the problem here.


Then you need glasses.


Sure it's a shame these innocent people were bothered, but these officers were only doing their jobs. Obviously whatever "tip" they got was wrong, but I'm sure they checked into it before busting down someones door.


Checked into it how? Meth labs aren't exactly portable. It's not like you have to hit one the second you hear about it in case it gets folded up like a pop-up kid's book and moved under moon and star.

All the police had to do was stake out the house for a day or two and watch. No door-busting, no guns, just watch, and wait. Had it been a real meth lab there would have been junkies in and out of that place 24/7. Drug houses are easy to spot for the trained eye, and cops are supposed to have better eyes than most. Had they actually used this tried-and-true tactic to verify the information they were given, this situation could have been avoided.

Here's how it could have gone:

Cops get a tip.

They check it out by staking out the house.

After watching for a day or two, they see no indicators of a meth lab. o junkies, no strange noises, no odd smells consistent with cooking meth.

Just to be sure, they do things the old-fashioned way:

They go to the front door and politely knock.

And don't give me a response like "and then promptly get shot in the gut" either, if there's been no indication of the sort of activity they're there to check out they can afford time to be polite.

They ask nicely if they can search. Many people, especially folks like the ones raided, with nothing to hide, would let them in to look around. You can't really hide a meth lab. It would pretty much have to be in plain sight. If the occupants don't allow them in they can try and get a warrant, and serve it at a reasonable hour if it's obtained. If not, too bad, so sad, check up on other leads.

That's how police work used to be done.

Now it's kick in the door first and ask questions later. Stupid move for a lot of reasons. Aside from the obvious threat of lawsuits from the unjustly searched, it escalates the overall social situation to one where cops are more likely, not less, to be resisted with violence. It's also incredibly dangerous, especially in a situation like this--the ingredients used to cook meth are highly volatile, and gunfire by either party might set off a fire or explosion. I recall a couple of times as a radio DJ reporting on suspected rural meth labs exploding.


In any case we don't have all the information to make that decision right now, so blaming the officers seems a little out of line to me.


Then who should we blame? Who takes the fall here? Who ensures proper justice is provided to this couple? I read a lot of posters on these forums saying we're too soft on criminals. Who stands up for the innocent victims of police mistakes and misconduct?


Once an investigation is done and we find these officers didn't follow procedure or were out of line, then we can search for justice. Until then, I'm not going to rush to judgment and point the finger at anyone.


How ironic. The police rush to judgment and point guns in the faces of two innocent people, sleeping in their bed in the middle of the night. Now the innocent have to wait to make sure the same police who obviously didn't perform their investigation properly to be properly investigated themselves. And you flippantly talk of the search for justice? What, exactly, does that word mean to you?



posted on Apr, 29 2008 @ 03:57 PM
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I think that a mistake was made.
The city repaired their door.
Perhaps a small fee should be paid for the inconvenience of the people.

If the couple sued, and I were on the jury, I would not agree to a big financial award. Just because the police made a mistake, I don't think that it means that you've won the lottery.

That's just my personal opinion.



posted on Apr, 29 2008 @ 04:04 PM
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The problem with the mistake, at least in my case, is this:

The guys were in Stealth mode..What If I had made an attempt to defend myself? It was at least 2 minutes before I was sure that these were cops.

What If I reached for a weapon..Like a knife, or a baseball bat? Because I thought I was about to die? (I did think that for a few minutes)..

If I had done that, I would not be here to tell the story...oooops, BANG! ..sorry, we made a mistake



posted on Apr, 29 2008 @ 04:19 PM
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Heres all I know, I'm a law abiding Citizen I don't do ANYTHING illegal, I know what I got in my house, and I know what I don't have, with that said, If my door EVER gets kicked in, I'll react on instinct.

[edit on 29-4-2008 by C0le]



posted on Apr, 29 2008 @ 04:40 PM
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reply to post by spacedoubt
 


That's a good point. What if someone reached for a weapon when there should never have been a raid?

But in this case no one was hurt. So, hopefully the police will use this as a traing opportunity to improve their analysis of the situation before a warrant is issued so that this cannot happen again.

Still, I don't think that a big cash payout is in order for the people whose apartment was raided.



posted on Apr, 29 2008 @ 04:46 PM
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Originally posted by Wildbob77
I think that a mistake was made.
The city repaired their door.
Perhaps a small fee should be paid for the inconvenience of the people.


Yes, here's a $5 coupon to Long John Silver's for the "minor inconvenience" of being thrown out of your bed at gunpoint in the middle of the night by a bunch of guys you don't know, all wearing black and hiding their faces so as not to be identified, claiming to be police (maybe they are, maybe not, most people wouldn't know a "real" police uniform from one put together from military surplus catalogs and online stores) and basically having the living Hell scared out of you for no reason other than someone didn't have the patience to spend 24 hours watching quietly to see who comes and goes from your home.


If the couple sued, and I were on the jury, I would not agree to a big financial award.


And that's why you shouldn't be on a jury.


Just because the police made a mistake, I don't think that it means that you've won the lottery.


It's not about getting rich. It's about punishing wrongdoing in order to prevent future wrongdoing. You think these people were just waiting for someone to sue for outrageous sums of money? No. Punitive damages are just that: A fine, same as you pay for a speeding ticket, with the goal of altering the behaviour of the offender. You pay your tickets and try not to speed in the future (at least not when there's a good chance of getting caught). They bust down the door and scare innocent people half to death, they should pay a very high price--enough of a price to make the city tighten the reigns on its police and prevent this from happening in the future.


That's just my personal opinion.


And my opinion is that cops carry the weight of the public trust. When cops make critical, easily avoidable errors such as this, they violate the social contract and jeopardize that trust. Police officers have too much authority, and too much available firepower, to be allowed to make such a horrible mistake without serious consequences. The officers in charge of this operation should be summarily fired and stripped of their pensions and the city and the department forced to pay millions in damages. They're supposed to work for us, not the other way around. Punitive damages are meant to ensure that.



posted on Apr, 29 2008 @ 04:50 PM
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Originally posted by nyk537
Obviously whatever "tip" they got was wrong, but I'm sure they checked into it before busting down someones door.


Well, obviously they didn't do a very good job on checking up on the tip, so someone should be disciplined, don't you think? Can't be having detectives screwing up such a simple investigation. I mean, they probably could have done a 'knock and talk' and the old couple would have let them check out the place. But, I guess they didn't think of that. Best just to bust in.

I didn't even think cops could come in on a tip without corroboration. Anybody with a grudge can get the cops to bust in your door now? A little judicial corruption ala Training Day, and they can get a warrant from an uncorroborated tip. Scary.



posted on Apr, 29 2008 @ 04:52 PM
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Its funny the British used to do this stuff in the 1760s and 1770s and it was one of the things that led to the revolutionary war...so I say to myself did we trade a king George for President Bush? Hmmm history people history if you dont know it it tends to repeat itself..our founding fathers would be rolling in their grave if they knew the freedoms we have lost.




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