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Stimulant Package-Help me spend it!

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posted on Apr, 29 2008 @ 04:29 PM
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Originally posted by FredT
Invest in GOOD water storage. Not the bottles or gallon jugs it comes in but rather food grade plastic drums (I keep 4 50 gallon drums) and several good filtering devices as well. They are about 50 bucks each and very robust

[edit on 4/29/08 by FredT]


Now there is an idea I like. Where can I get these drums? and how about a 50 gallon drum of fuel for a generator? where do I get those?




posted on Apr, 29 2008 @ 04:29 PM
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Originally posted by menguard
Some NVG night vision goggles, flint, water purifying tablets or plenty of bleach, wet suit, thermal underwear, compass, solar powered flashlights or energy regenerative flashlights.



Sleeping bags, Tents, a fold up shovel you can carry on a belt. A rifle.





[edit on 29-4-2008 by menguard]


interesting list menguard. I had a friend that routinely hitched from Minnesota to Maine and he wore a wetsuit under his clothes when it was cool to cold. The flint is a great idea. I got a piece from Boy Scouts 25 years ago that i still keep. To flint ad magnifying glass. Get a few extra as these will be very handy for everyone.

I like a pulaski better than a shovel for breaking up ground, chopping wood etc. Just need a file to sharpen it and something else to use for moving quantities of dirt like an actual shovel. These tools would help the traveler get work as well.

I will be buying equipment for a cheap but functional greenhouse this spring/summer. If you have light and can trap its warmth you can grow food even in winter.

I keep bringing up learning how to garden in these threads. You really have to start learning a few basics. This will help you ride out periodic hyperinflation or run on supplies. Food preservation would be the next step. For next to no money with the right knowledge a person in the right place could life a lifetime unaided.

Personally I think alot of this is much ado about nothing, where nothing = change. Adapt or die. It's ok its in our genes!



posted on Apr, 29 2008 @ 04:32 PM
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reply to post by stikkinikki
 


I agree with you. Lucky for me, growing up on a farm, serving in the marines, and building houses in Lake Tahoe have allowed me the opportunity to learn all the skills needed to "start over". I wish that I owned my home, then a greenhouse would work. Unless there is one I can leave packed up until needed?



posted on Apr, 29 2008 @ 04:39 PM
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Cheap rolls of green fencing. Thick sturdy plastic. Unroll two flat sides cover over the tops and zip tie the two sides together into an a frame. Where the plastic hits the ground cover with a long row of dirt. On the ends cut some triangles of fence larger than the ends and bend them over and zip tie on. Each week cut the ties and open up to do what work needs done. Takes very little water. Use a thermometer to decide how much vent is used on each end. When done roll your aframe up for storage. If larger fence is used the cheap metal fence poles can be driven in for supports. Gives you a greenhouse and animal control at the same time, just buy the big bags of zip ties or rig up your own thing with twine or wire.

Cheap and effective. Build to the size of your space.



posted on Apr, 29 2008 @ 04:43 PM
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reply to post by Illahee
 


Not to sound dumb, but could you post a link or photo of what you are talking about? do you mean dust catchers from construction sites?



posted on Apr, 29 2008 @ 04:50 PM
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reply to post by jasonjnelson
 


No actually they sell rolls of cheap green painted metal wire fencing. Unroll two strips as long as your plot and put them up in a long A frame shape. Use rolls of plastic over those and at the peak fold the plastic inside and zip tie the peak together so it holds the top of the plastic, then where it drapes down to the ground hold it down with a row of dirt. Cut the same wire for 'doors on the ends only bigger and fold it to the triangle shape. Zip tie the folded down part to the A frame. Never had rabbits or deer get into one yet. The fence is about 4' tall so its about 3' at the A frame peak. a couple rows of short crops and one tall row in the middle. Beats the early frost too.

I have piles of the cheap metal posts so I pound those in and leave them for a frame. Have seen people use wood too but the metal is solid every year.

[edit on 29-4-2008 by Illahee]



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