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Cosmic time warp revealed in slow-motion supernovae

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posted on Apr, 28 2008 @ 08:01 PM
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Cosmic time warp revealed in slow-motion supernovae


spac e.newscientist.com

Once upon a time, time was different. Supernova explosions in the early universe appear to age more slowly than today's supernovae, as if time itself was running slower back then, according to a recent series of astronomical observations. This cosmic time warp is exactly what should be produced by the expansion of the universe, confirming conventional big bang theory.
In that mainstream picture, the fabric of space is expanding everywhere – an idea predicted by Einstein's general theory of relativity and tested by observation.
(visit the link for the full news article)


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posted on Apr, 28 2008 @ 08:01 PM
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They're saying they have found evidence of "time dialation" by studying the natural progression of events in supernova (catastrophic thermonuclear destruction of a white dwarf star). This destruction is predictable as the spectra of light it emits changes over the period of weeks acting with clocklike accuracy. So when you analyse the red shift of the supernova you find out how long ago the explosion occurred. Those explosions that occurred long ago (greater red shift) aged as much as 60% slower than recent supernova indicating that time moved slower back then than it does today.

So my guestion is: Were coffee breaks shorter back in those early days?

spac e.newscientist.com
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Apr, 28 2008 @ 09:40 PM
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very interesting indeed!

I don't think time would be any different... if you launch a rocket 1 time every second, what this is saying is because of the expansion of space, the space in between each rocket increases... As it increases it spreads the gap between them even further apart which would prove the universe is expanding... Exponentially larger lengths of time between each rocket... Does not mean time was any different in my opinion, at least the way it was described I could get a visualization of what they meant... My guess would be the further you are away from an event the more dilation in the sequence you will see...

Course what do I know, I'm not a rocket scientist by any means



posted on Apr, 28 2008 @ 10:01 PM
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Thought I'd give you a visual of what I was talking about...




posted on Apr, 28 2008 @ 11:36 PM
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reply to post by ElectricUncleSam
 

Hi Electric,
It appears by reading feedback under the article in New Scientist that the time dilation is controversial. Some think it just appears dilated from our expanded perspective but:

Quote from the article:


In the new research, an international team of astronomers have gone much further by monitoring 13 supernovae at a range of redshifts, and therefore a range of distances. The earliest and most distant of these slow-mo explosions appeared to age at only about 60% of the normal rate seen in supernovae today.The amount of time dilation increases with redshift, as expected if both are caused by the expansion of space


So they say that the time dilation is caused by the expansion. To us it appears that things are taking up to 60% longer to happen. So their 10 minute coffee breaks appear to take 16 minutes to us. But to them our coffee breaks would appear very short.



posted on Apr, 28 2008 @ 11:53 PM
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I think to them they would appear long as well.. If "they" are the same distance from us as we are from them etc... Or it could just be the distortion of the light particles traveling from so far away... All I know is all physics and time and everything like that are warped when you talk about space... It's so huge and so much to take in from our small point of view...



posted on Apr, 29 2008 @ 02:53 AM
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I think to them they would appear long as well.. If "they" are the same distance from us as we are from them etc... Or it could just be the distortion of the light particles traveling from so far away.
reply to post by ElectricUncleSam
 


Well "they" would be around 13 billion years older now and if they were making observations about us now then what they were seeing would have occured here 13 million years ago. So to us they would have experience red shift and time distortion and the same would have occured to them observing us.

And regarding the alleged "distortion of light". We have been measuring the parameters of light for some 100 years or so and don't really know if that could be possible other that to say that is shouldn't happen according to our our Einsteinean theories. But a species that has been studying light for 10 thousand or 10 million years probably would! The possibility of that seems infinately possible somewhere in that 13 or 14 billion years.




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