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Storing rice, flour, other dry goods

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posted on Apr, 25 2008 @ 04:48 PM
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Hey all, I was just wondering, what are your preferred methods for storing rice, flour, grains etc. for long term storage?

This week I'm going to attempt to buy some bulk supplies if they can still be found, and I need some containers that will survive being toted through the bush.

Also, how much grain, flour, rice, and other dry goods should one realistically stockpile to have a solid month's supply per person?




posted on Apr, 25 2008 @ 04:53 PM
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reply to post by DezertSkies
 


I like canning. Glass jars also work great.

For vegetables, I like a root cellar. You can keep potatoes and other "root" veggies stored for some time. You dig a ditch and build the shed/structure a few feet under the ground. The inside temperature will stay about 55 degrees year round. Our pantry at home has similar technology and it works wonders for keeping beer cold
.

As for rice and flour, as long as they're not exposed to sunlight they store indefinitely. I know both can be stored for a long long time.

As for a stockpile, it depends on how much your family eats. I need at least 1-3 pounds of food a day, depending on what I'm doing. I have a very fast metabolism, so that may be part of it.



posted on Apr, 25 2008 @ 05:59 PM
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Storing rice, grains, beans, pasta and many other long term storage foods is HIGHLY dependant on temperature. The colder the and more STABLE the storage area, the longer foods can be kept.

Temp.
Stability
Humidity

Keep those in check and food stores can last 20+ years.

BTW: If buying rice, make sure to NOT buy brown rice as the variety will not last longer than a yr before going rancid (due to the fatty acids in brown rice). White rice will not have these problems.



posted on Apr, 25 2008 @ 06:30 PM
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I use 5 gallon buckets with screw on lids that can be bought, I bought my lids at the Sportmans Guide. The buckets are clean and have never stored anything. I leave the rice, pasta, dried beans in their original bag then I take a plastic trash bag and place the items in the bag. Tie off the end of the bag, place the bag in the bucket and screw the lid on.

here is a link:
www.sportsmansguide.com...

Be safe,
Jason



posted on Apr, 25 2008 @ 06:56 PM
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Check out this website...everything you need to know.

www.endtimesreport.com...



posted on Apr, 25 2008 @ 07:00 PM
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Vaccume packing is really ideal as well. While the smaller units seen on TV would be a bit much to do large scale, we have had some success with using the bags they cell for compressing clothes.



posted on Apr, 25 2008 @ 07:19 PM
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I also use the 5 gallon buckets. Ideally I'd like to vaccum seal individual packages in family size portions, but that will take time and is on the bottom of my to-do list.



posted on Apr, 25 2008 @ 08:42 PM
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Originally posted by DezertSkies
I was just wondering, what are your preferred methods for storing rice, flour, grains etc. for long term storage?


You know those tins that popcorn comes in .. the big tins of popcorn that you can buy at walmart? THOSE tins can be used. Put bags of rice (ETC) in those tins and seal them up with duct tape. You can store the grain for a longer time then if you just left them in bags on the shelf.

(I learned that during the Y2K scare)



posted on Feb, 9 2009 @ 05:34 PM
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posted on Feb, 10 2009 @ 01:59 PM
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You can extend the shelf life even more by putting a couple Oxygen absorbers in the bucket with the rice. Light, heat and oxygen are the things that shorten the shelf life.



posted on Feb, 11 2009 @ 10:29 AM
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www.ext.vt.edu...

Probably the best link I have ever found on food storage as it lays out almost everythings ideal shelf life, some stuff might be stretched beyond the perscribed time however I wouldnt risk possible illness in a situation where survival is alot harder becuase of a Sit X/SHTF Scenario.



posted on Feb, 11 2009 @ 12:28 PM
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What about pasta.

I am looking at keeping a supply of past ready but what pasta stores longest ???



posted on Feb, 11 2009 @ 12:54 PM
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Originally posted by colec156
what pasta stores longest ???


Spagetti???


Okay, frivolity over with, I would imagine as long as it's not the fresh variety and that hard dehydrated stuff it doesn't matter which pasta you have.

I'd imagine the "use by" date is pretty flexible too.



posted on Feb, 11 2009 @ 01:10 PM
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I wanted to add something here.

I bake a lot of my own bread using name brand flour here in the UK. I have often found small mites in the flour, usually every fourth bag i get a small black spot that jumps around in the flour. The wholemeal flours seem to have more than the white flours. I suppose this is because of the bleaching process with white flour.

Before storing any flour i suggest you place it in a freezer and freeze it fully for a few days to make sure any bugs in it are dead.

EDIT

You can also throw the flour in a microwave and that should kill any bugs in it.

[edit on 11-2-2009 by ImaginaryReality1984]



posted on Feb, 11 2009 @ 09:32 PM
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Agree with the posters about the 5 gallon plastic buckets.

I get mine from Home Depot complete with lids. I also have a Food Saver type vacuum sealer. I seperate my white rice into smaller portions from the 25 pound bags in which I purchace it. I then put it into the 5 gallon buckets in which is also a large plastic trash bag.

I am also aware that you can get 5 gallon buckets from Sportsmans Guide as I have thier catalogue.

I will soon be going out to buy a couple more bags of rice for storage in this method.

Thanks,
Orangetom



posted on Feb, 11 2009 @ 09:39 PM
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Why not just buy cases of MREs? They have a lot of calories and protein, will outlive you, and are small and easy to store.



posted on Feb, 11 2009 @ 10:22 PM
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Here's a link that will give you a pretty good outline how much to store.
Basic list per person for one year

SEED BANKS

survival seeds

More seeds

EMERGENCY FOOD AND STUFF

KITS AND SUPPLIES

Hope this covers the bases for you.



posted on Feb, 28 2009 @ 07:48 PM
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We went on a three week tirp and discovered the larger the package, the more you can fit in. The more you fit in the less air and moisture there is to ruin the food. Vaccumm sealing works well howeverbe careful what methods you use or you may end up ruining the food anyway. Also dont drap the pack in the food or you may get wildies after you.



posted on Feb, 28 2009 @ 08:29 PM
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Originally posted by ImaginaryReality1984
I wanted to add something here.

I bake a lot of my own bread using name brand flour here in the UK. I have often found small mites in the flour, usually every fourth bag i get a small black spot that jumps around in the flour. The wholemeal flours seem to have more than the white flours. I suppose this is because of the bleaching process with white flour.

Before storing any flour i suggest you place it in a freezer and freeze it fully for a few days to make sure any bugs in it are dead.

EDIT

You can also throw the flour in a microwave and that should kill any bugs in it.

[edit on 11-2-2009 by ImaginaryReality1984]



Those black bugs are weavils ... and you're right about the bleaching process causing fewer in the flour. During the bleaching process most of the nutrient value of flour is lost.

------------------------------------------------------

As far as what to store, beans, rice, wheat, oats, spices and oil/shortening. It's all well and good to have beans and rice but without some sort of seasoning (salt/pepper/etc) they'll be pretty bland. The oil/shortening is for the fats your body needs.

Here is one of my fave sites Captain Daves

They have a very good "Food FAQ" available as well as basic survival information.



posted on Feb, 28 2009 @ 08:39 PM
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Best place for buckets right now is home depot. It's about four bucks with the lid and the lids have a good rubber gasket.
Quick and dirty would be in the bucket with a good shot of nitrogen gas to keep oxidation down.
If you have the time and money get mylar bags and oxygen absorbers as well.
Most of the online stores charge a premium for this and shipping is steep.
Buying at the store would work fine for most to get basics. Just make sure it is sealed and in a cool place.




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