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Question/Idea on "dark matter"

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posted on Apr, 24 2008 @ 07:17 PM
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I dabble in science- I dont know a ton, but I take an interest and play with the problems.

So I was thinking about this supposed constant counter to gravity that Einstein tried to hammer into his theories to allow for a static universe, which apparently is functioning on some level, since we can't account for all the gravity.

Then it hit me that I've heard the suggestion that space/time may form a mobius strip. I forget who suggested it. Anyway, that would explain it! Take the analogy of a bowlingball on a bedsheet which is so often used to explain gravity.

Well on a mobius strip, matter which is creating gravity in its own vicinity would be causing not only a well on its side of the strip but also a bulge on the opposite side (i realize mobius strips are technically one side, but you see my meaning). That would mean that matter can exert a localized force equal and opposite to gravity in spacetime that is quite remote from the matter in question.

Has this ever been seriously suggested and/or shot down, and where could I read up on it?




posted on Apr, 25 2008 @ 01:19 AM
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I'm told that one of the simplest solutions to Einsteins equations is a time loop. That is the universe keeps repeating itself over and over. In such things time travel is possible. A mobius strip or Kleins bottle may well be possible.

I think the problem with dark matter and the expanding universe theory is the terribly flawed red shift theory. Van Flandern and Arp have been poking some serious holes in this theory for quite some time.

Halton Arp has made some really good observations with regards to the obvious structural relationship between celestial objects with completely different redshifts (quasars and some nearby galaxies.)

Also the red shifts are anisotropic and actually dependent on the location of the observer. That suggests to me that associating them solely with a Doppler shift is a poor model.

Maybe the electric universe guys are right and electro-magnetic forces dominate the large scale structure.



posted on May, 4 2008 @ 04:56 AM
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Well that's kind of sort of like what most scientists think. It's thought that the universe is a curved 3d space, so if you go far enough in any of the three spatial dimensions, you'll end up where you started. It's kind of sort of like a moebius strip.

Dark energy, as posited from observation, doesn't work like that though. If it exists, it is a repelling force that increases in strength with distance, which is pretty weird stuff. It could mean that the universe is expanding in all directions and it's rate of expansion is always accelerating, so the distances between everything that isn't held together by gravity is increasing faster and faster.


And please, those "flaws" in the red shift theory are just ad-hoc explanations to prop up their failed theories. There's a reason that nobody cares about Van Flandern and Arp. They may have laughed at Galileo, but they also laughed at Trofyim Lysenko, and bozo the clown. You aren't wrong because you're mocked or ignored, but you're certainly not right because of it.



posted on May, 8 2008 @ 02:05 PM
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Well on a mobius strip, matter which is creating gravity in its own vicinity would be causing not only a well on its side of the strip but also a bulge on the opposite side (i realize mobius strips are technically one side, but you see my meaning). That would mean that matter can exert a localized force equal and opposite to gravity in spacetime that is quite remote from the matter in question.


Interesting idea. But I can see a possible flaw in this idea. You see Hubble's law tells us the recessional velocity of a galaxy is proportional to its distance from us. This equation suggests that the repulsive force of dark energy must be uniformly distributed in space. Your idea suggests that there would be pockets of dark energy ( on the opposite side) rather than a uniform distribution in space. A major flaw in my yet unexperienced eyes.



posted on May, 9 2008 @ 10:46 AM
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reply to post by The Strategist
 


I did a gravity and 'dark matter' rant over here.

here

Be back to help out, must recover first.




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