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Will new collider create black holes that destroy us all?

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posted on Apr, 24 2008 @ 03:37 AM
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Will new collider create black holes that destroy us all?


www.boston.com

The Large Hadron Collider is a particle accelerator collider being built at the European Laboratory for Particle Physics, or CERN, straddling the French-Swiss border near Geneva. It should be completed and ready to start producing data sometime this summer. In it, scientists will be able to smash protons travelling at more than 99.99 percent of the speed of light with protons traveling in the opposite direction at the same speed.
(visit the link for the full news article)


Related News Links:
www.boston.com

[edit on 24-4-2008 by drock905]




posted on Apr, 24 2008 @ 03:37 AM
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I don't know about you, but even after reading this I'm still kind of uneasy about this whole operation, because of statements like this....

"The odds of this actually happening are PRETTY MUCH zero for several reasons"

"Pretty much zero" still seems like a lot of risk when your talking about the possibility of destroying the earth.

www.boston.com
(visit the link for the full news article)

[edit on 24-4-2008 by drock905]



posted on Apr, 24 2008 @ 03:52 AM
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reply to post by drock905
 


Yeah this one scares the bejesus out of me. There is no room for 'if' , or 'pretty much'. I thought scientists would know better, this is like science gone mad! Unless there is reason to think that a black hole is in our near future, and they are going to create one to see the nature of it firsthand before earth suffers one, there is no other reason to conduct this test.



posted on Apr, 24 2008 @ 04:35 AM
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Sorry, but this is 'breaking news' how? It's been under construction for ages, it's not producing data yet, so what's new?

Anyway, it's a fascinating subject for me. I don't like the risk, but I'm desperate for a breakthrough in physics that will get us out into space, and this could be it.

Personally though, I preferred the Times article on the subject


One report put the odds of a strangelet disaster at less than one in 50 million, less than a chance of winning some lottery jackpots. Dr. Kent, in a 2003 paper, used the standard insurance company method to calculate expected losses to explore how stringent this bound on danger was. He multiplied the disaster probability times the cost, in this case the loss of the global population, six billion. A result was that, in actuarial terms, the Rhic collider could kill up to 120 people in a decade of operation.


www.nytimes.com...

Edited to clarify the Rhic collider referred to in the above quote:


Dr. Calogero commented, as did Dr. Kent, in 2000 after a very public battle on the safety of another accelerator, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, or Rhic, at the Brookhaven National Laboratory on Long Island.


Source as above.

[edit on 24-4-2008 by TheStev]



posted on Apr, 24 2008 @ 04:47 AM
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The answer to this question is apparently "no."

Good news! Black hole won't destroy Earth



...such trapped black holes are so tiny, they could pass through a block of iron the distance from the Earth to the Moon and not hit anything. They would each take about 100 hours to gobble up one proton.

At that rate, even if one did not take into account the fact that each black hole would slow down every time it gobbled up a proton, and thus suck down matter at an even slower rate, "about 100 protons would be destroyed every year by such a black hole, so it would take much more than the age of universe to destroy even one milligram of Earth material," Landsberg concluded. "It's quite hard to destroy the Earth."


However, the article does alson state that...


...the chance of planetary annihilation by this means "is totally miniscule..."


...suggesting that there is some risk, which I will readily admit does still disturb me.



posted on Apr, 24 2008 @ 05:00 AM
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How in the hell can anyone say, even those scientist who are working on this particular project, how can they say something we have never tampered with before, and don't know the out come of, that we are safe? Even a miniscule chance of destroying the whole earth is enough to say no to this machine!



posted on Apr, 24 2008 @ 09:44 AM
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Particles/neutrinos etc have been battering into this planet for billions of years with energy far in excess of the LHC. Last time I checked...we're all still here. There is simply no such thing as "zero risk" but I would say the potential for disaster over the LHC carries a risk as close to zero as you're ever going to get. a 50ft Rat is more likely to destroy the planet than the LHC!!



posted on Apr, 24 2008 @ 10:00 AM
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Originally posted by PW229
a 50ft Rat is more likely to destroy the planet than the LHC!!



Yeah... or a bowl of petunia, perhaps a giant whale falling from the sky... maybe I should carry my towel all the time from now on, right?


Peace



posted on Apr, 24 2008 @ 10:08 AM
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ROUS? I don't think they exist...

and yes this is old news. =) cool stuff though. i personally don't fret our impending implosion. at least we won't have government corruption to deal with.



posted on Apr, 24 2008 @ 10:14 AM
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Originally posted by Sator

Originally posted by PW229
a 50ft Rat is more likely to destroy the planet than the LHC!!



Yeah... or a bowl of petunia, perhaps a giant whale falling from the sky... maybe I should carry my towel all the time from now on, right?


Peace
'

I'll acknowledge that humorous Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy reference


But on topic, surely this isn't the first thing in the history of science for them to experiment with that has some risk of destroying the planet? Didn't they have a sneeking suspicion that the first A-Bomb could infact set the entire atmosphere on fire and kill every living thing on Earth? Yes they still tested it.

I can't think of anything else that they could have mucked around with that would have had that effect, but still, I can't imagine there would be a concerning risk, especially if they're freely telling the public about it.



posted on May, 6 2008 @ 11:36 PM
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this is probably wrong and please correct me if i am, but i always thought that as black holes grow they suck more and more matter getting bigger and in turn sucking in more matter?????

is their size stable?? Do they grow exponentially(sp)??




posted on May, 6 2008 @ 11:45 PM
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Originally posted by drock905

Will new collider create black holes that destroy us all?



God I hope so.....

Sorry someone had to say it.




posted on May, 7 2008 @ 12:07 AM
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Here's the major problem everyone seems to be over looking.

Earthquakes!!!!! Thousands of them when they set this thing off. Just my opinion.



posted on May, 7 2008 @ 12:11 AM
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reply to post by space cadet
 



Even a miniscule chance of destroying the whole earth is enough to say no to this machine!


wow - just the sort of thinking that paralyses all progress

lets not do ANYTHING that may have any risk attached

dont go out - you might get struck by lightening - but dont stay in either - the build up of radon gas in your basement might kil you

oh , what to do


basically - i do not care much beyond my own life - yes i really am that selfish - if i am going to die - why should i give a crap the continued existance of the other 6.5 billion on this planet will NOT benefit me once i am dead



posted on May, 10 2008 @ 05:44 AM
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reply to post by ignorant_ape
 


Your name is quite appropriate. There is no way to compare destroying the earth and going out or staying in the house. Unlike you, I am not worried for myself, I am thinking of the world's populace.

[edit on 10-5-2008 by space cadet]



posted on May, 10 2008 @ 07:02 AM
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The threat of Black Holes devouring the Earth from the Hadron Collider have plagued it since it's inception.

And guess what they've been discussed, discussed, discussed and disseminated 1000 times and there is still no evidence that any "micro-black hole" possibly created by the LHC could pose any threat to Earth:
cerncourier.com...
askanexpert.web.cern.ch...

Physics cannot provide a zero probability for anything.
There is a conditional probability that the Sun could tomorrow stop producing energy and we'd all be left in darkness.

There's a chance the Earth could spin out of orbit, or it's molten core could stop rotating and our planet's electromagnetic field would cease to exist thus we all get fried from Solar Radiation, there's an innumerable amount of catastrophic scenarios in quantum physics that all do have a chance of occuring.

That said... THE ACTUAL PROBABILITY of these things occurring is so low; (somewhere on the order of 0.000000000000000000000000001^ 0.0000000000000001%) you have a higher chance of being killed by an elephant that devoured by a Blackhole.

Risk is an inalienable part of Physics. Scientists know going in there's a chance things could wrong, which is why the Hadron Collider was designed with the idea in mind to minimize any chance of catastrophical failure to a point so low, it would be acceptable, and they have.

If the slightest possibility of danger justifies canceling research than humanity would be no where near as advanced as it is today.
Remember the Greater the Risk=The Greater the Return...
It's all a matter of simple mathematics, sure there is a fine line between Quantum Physics and playing with fire, but I think in this case it's safe to say the risk is absolutely, positively so minimal and unlikely, that we are justified in pursuing the research.

[edit on 10/5/08 by The Godfather of Conspira]



posted on May, 10 2008 @ 07:31 AM
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reply to post by space cadet
 


yes - the analogy i made is perfectly valid - some people do actually refuse to leave thier house because of the fear of what could happen if they did

you are advocating cancelling an important scientific experiment , based on the fear of what could happen if it goes wromg

there is absolutly no difference .



posted on May, 10 2008 @ 08:06 AM
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Oh do we like our doomsday scenarios. I know I do. I can google up some nice ones about CERN’s ‘doomsday device’ but why read when you can put your legs up and watch CERN’s worst case prediction online? As a bonus there are four more scenario’s included. (It’s staged like Groundhog day.)

It's good fun.

Enjoy:


Google Video Link



posted on May, 10 2008 @ 08:22 AM
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I think of it like this: if the potential risk is so great that everyone living on the Earth would be utterly destroyed, the potential breakthroughs have to be enormous.

They thought the atom bomb would destory the Earth..... but they had to find out somehow - luckily that wasn't the case. Then again, they eventually will.

[edit on 10-5-2008 by dodgygeeza]



posted on May, 10 2008 @ 08:35 AM
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I have been following this for some time and I honestly believe nothing will happen with these black holes please watch this video for all your CON"CERN"

-Kdial1




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