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US wants airlines to collect biometrics

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posted on Apr, 23 2008 @ 07:51 AM
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US wants airlines to collect biometrics


www.news.com.au

THE US government said it wants airlines and cruiseliners to take biometric data from foreigners leaving the country under new plans aimed at fighting terrorism and illegal immigration.
(visit the link for the full news article)



[edit on 23/4/2008 by SilentShadow]




posted on Apr, 23 2008 @ 07:51 AM
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Having recently been to the US and had my fingerprints taken upon arrival (which was not the case the last time i visited) i found that a little odd, but bearable. I could understand if i committed a crime and left fingerprints they could trace me, whatever.

BUT...

What need is there to print OUTGOING passengers? What has the US Big Brother decided is so important that it requires outgoing prints of passengers?

There is NO terrorism threat if the person is leaving the country.

I thought maybe for hijackers, however, they are only required to send the data on within 24hours. Most planes will have landed before that time is up. I see no point except creating more of a police state that monitors its people.

www.news.com.au
(visit the link for the full news article)

[edit on 23/4/2008 by SilentShadow]



posted on Apr, 23 2008 @ 08:57 AM
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Biometrics doesn't even work. One of the local grocery stores here was using biometrics (thumbprint scan) for awhile, can't remember exactly what it was tied to, but they recently canned the thing because it wasn't even remotely reliable. Working in an industry that requires fingerprinting of candidates I can assure you the digital systems used to scan biometric data work, on average, only 80% of the time if you're lucky. Many people have prints the scanners can't "read" (my fiancee has this problem, as a massage therapist she's required to be fingerprinted for licensing but her prints are very faint-almost nonexistent) and that's the systems used professionally by none other than the FBI. I think we're actually a long way off from using biometrics daily as a ubiquitous ID system. The equipment is expensive, it's unreliable, and frankly the public, as I've seen, doesn't like it despite assurances of convenience and security. As for using it at airports, well, I'm surprised it's taken them this long to put it in. But again, what if your prints don't "read" normally? What if the operator is a putz? Will you be detained and miss your flight? Or worse?



posted on Apr, 23 2008 @ 09:35 AM
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reply to post by SilentShadow
 

There is NO terrorism threat if the person is leaving the country.


Not necessarily true. Consider the person didn't get printed when he/she originally came in. Now consider they just comitted a crime or possibly a delayed crime of sorts (a later explosion, for example). Now they know who it is if they find prints.

I am certainly not "for" this move, regardless if biometrics works or not



posted on Apr, 23 2008 @ 11:05 AM
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Originally posted by RabbitChaser
Consider the person didn't get printed when he/she originally came in. Now consider they just comitted a crime or possibly a delayed crime of sorts (a later explosion, for example). Now they know who it is if they find prints.


Ahh very true... i did not think of that.


Originally posted by The Nighthawk
Working in an industry that requires fingerprinting of candidates I can assure you the digital systems used to scan biometric data work, on average, only 80% of the time if you're lucky.


As well as being a teacher i also work in a factory (for extra money) and we use a fingerprint machine in order to 'clock in and clock out'. I have never encountered problems with it, nor have i seen anyone with problems. It's quick and easy, input code, scan finger, done. The only time i have had problems is when my hands have been particularly dirty.



posted on Apr, 23 2008 @ 11:36 AM
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Originally posted by SilentShadow
As well as being a teacher i also work in a factory (for extra money) and we use a fingerprint machine in order to 'clock in and clock out'. I have never encountered problems with it, nor have i seen anyone with problems. It's quick and easy, input code, scan finger, done. The only time i have had problems is when my hands have been particularly dirty.


Then you're fortunate. As I've stated, the biggest problem comes when someone has very faint or almost no prints to scan, and there's more people like that out there than most realize.

You're in a largely controlled environment where everybody is part of a closed system. A big open system like one would need at airports, with the sheer amount of usage that would be involved, makes things more likely to break down.

In public use such as at a retail store, the likelihood of it working properly drops even more drastically due to the sheer numbers, the questionable hygeine of some patrons, inadequate training in the use of the system for both patrons and employees, and a general lack of regular (and expensive) maintenance makes the reliability of such systems doubtful at best.

Like I said, we have FBI-trained operators and good equpiment and we still have problems.

[edit on 4/23/2008 by The Nighthawk]



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