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Who changed the 2nd Commandment?

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posted on Apr, 22 2008 @ 04:28 AM
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I don’t post on this subject much. However, there is a question I would love to get to the bottom off. I have looked it up, but keep getting conflicting answers. The Catholic Church says, “It didn’t do it” and blames it on the protestants. So
Who changed the 2nd comandment?
Personally think it was the Catholic Church. Only because they would benefit from doing so. (Worship idols) please correct me if I am wrong.





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Mod Edit: All Caps – Please Review This Link.

[edit on 22-4-2008 by Gemwolf]

[edit on 22/4/08 by iammonkey]




posted on Apr, 22 2008 @ 07:27 AM
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reply to post by iammonkey
 


Wow! 41 views and not one reply. Either 41 people are like my self and do not know the answer. Or 41 catholic’s had a quick look. Have I hit a nerve? Well I will continue to believe it WAS the c.c that changed it.



posted on Apr, 22 2008 @ 07:40 AM
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The Ten Commandments from the Talmud can be found here.

Here are the Catholic Ten Commandments.

And last but not least, the Protestant Ten Commandments here.

You decide who changed what.



posted on Apr, 22 2008 @ 07:48 AM
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reply to post by darkelf
 


Thank you very much

not just for the links but foryour time.



posted on Apr, 22 2008 @ 08:04 AM
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I believe it was Constantine (or at least the priests) in the translation of the Codex A and B at Egypt.

How did Christianity become paganized?



posted on Apr, 22 2008 @ 08:17 AM
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reply to post by darkelf
 


Aniconism in Judaism

The Hebrew Bible, Tenakh



Exodus 20:2–17
2 I am the Lord your God, who brought you out of the land of Egypt, out of the house of slavery;

3 Do not have any other gods before me.

4 You shall not make for yourself an idol, whether in the form of anything that is in heaven above, or that is on the earth beneath, or that is in the water under the earth.

5 You shall not bow down to them or worship them; for I the Lord your God am a jealous God, punishing children for the iniquity of parents, to the third and the fourth generation of those who reject me,

6 but showing steadfast love to the thousandth generation of those who love me and keep my commandments.

7 You shall not make wrongful use of the name of the Lord your God, for the Lord will not acquit anyone who misuses his name.

8 Remember the Sabbath day and keep it holy.

9 For six days you shall labour and do all your work.

10 But the seventh day is a Sabbath to the Lord your God; you shall not do any work—you, your son or your daughter, your male or female slave, your livestock, or the alien resident in your towns.

11 For in six days the Lord made heaven and earth, the sea, and all that is in them, but rested the seventh day; therefore the Lord blessed the Sabbath day and consecrated it.

12 Honor your father and your mother, so that your days may be long in the land that the Lord your God is giving you.

13 You shall not murder.

14 You shall not commit adultery.

15 You shall not steal.

16 You shall not bear false witness against your neighbour.
17 You shall not covet your neighbour’s house; you shall not covet your neighbour’s wife, or male or female slave, or ox, or donkey, or anything that belongs to your neighbor.


[edit on 22-4-2008 by Clearskies]



posted on Apr, 22 2008 @ 08:30 AM
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I wonder why the difference in the two. The torah Darkelf quoted and the Tenakh I found.
?????



posted on Apr, 22 2008 @ 08:37 AM
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As I understand it, the actual commandments are strewn throughout the books of Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Deuteronomy, and Numbers. The Ten commandments are simply an abridged form of the original commandments given to Moses in Exodus 20 for the Israelites. I guess somewhere down the line, the churches figured their congregations were too simpleminded for the full version?

Anyway, I want to thank darkelf for his links. very interesting reading. Apparently the Catholics are very heavy into the 'do not covet' area.


TheRedneck



posted on Apr, 22 2008 @ 08:54 AM
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reply to post by Clearskies
 


My appologies, I quoted the Talmud not the Torah. Ten Commandments from the Torah can be found here.



posted on Apr, 22 2008 @ 11:50 AM
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Here is something from Wikipedia. I don't like to use them as a source, but in this case they reference better sources.

I'll try to dig up more information for you.

*edit: Here is a discussion of the differences in Exodus 20 and Deuteronomy 5 and their 'numbering' of the Decalogue:
www.catholic.com...

Eric

_____________________
Roman Catholic and Lutheran Christianity

The Lutheran and Roman Catholic division of the commandments both follow the one established by St. Augustine, following the then current synagogue scribal division. The first three commandments govern the relationship between God and humans, the fourth through eighth govern public relationships between people, and the last two govern private thoughts. For additional information on the Catholic understanding of the Ten Commandments, see the Catechism of the Catholic Church (1994), sections 2052–2557. References to the Catechism are provided below for each commandment as well as the interpretation used by Lutherans and Catholics. The following text is from Deuteronomy 5:6–5:21 NRSV

1. "I am the LORD your God, who brought you out of the land of Egypt, out of the house of slavery; you shall have no other gods before me. You shall not make for yourself an idol, whether in the form of anything that is in heaven above, or that is on the earth beneath, or that is in the water under the earth. You shall not bow down to them or worship them; for I the LORD your God am a jealous God, punishing children for the iniquity of parents, to the third and fourth generation of those who reject me, but showing steadfast love to the thousandth generation of those who love me and keep my commandments."

Catholic teaching distinguishes between dulia—paying honor to God through contemplation of objects such as paintings and statues—and latria—adoration directed to God alone. (See Catechism 2084–2141.)

2. "You shall not make wrongful use of the name of the LORD your God, for the LORD will not acquit anyone who misuses his name."

This commandment prohibits not just swearing but the misappropriation of religious language in order to commit a crime, participating in occult practices, and blaspheming against places or people that are holy to God. (See Catechism 2142–2167.)

3. "Observe the sabbath day and keep it holy, as the LORD your God commanded you. Six days you shall labor and do all your work. But the seventh day is a sabbath to the LORD your God; you shall not do any work—you, or your son or your daughter, or your male or female slave, or your ox or your donkey, or any of your livestock, or the resident alien in your towns, so that your male and female slave may rest as well as you. Remember that you were a slave in the land of Egypt, and the LORD your God brought you out from there with a mighty hand and an outstretched arm; therefore the LORD your God commanded you to keep the sabbath day."
4. "Honor your father and your mother, as the LORD your God commanded you, so that your days may be long and that it may go well with you in the land that the LORD your God is giving you."

This commandment emphasizes the family as part of God's design, as well as an extended metaphor that God uses for his relationship with his creation. (See Catechism 2197–2257.)

5. "(Roman Catholic) You shall not kill / (Lutheran) You shall not murder"

The right of states to execute criminals is not absolutely forbidden by this commandment. However, other methods of protecting society (incarceration, rehabilitation) are increasingly available and more in keeping with other Christian moral teaching. Catholics (along with many Protestants) also consider abortion sinful and a violation of this commandment. War, if rigorous conditions of moral legitimacy are met (that is, the "use of arms must not produce evils and disorders graver than the evil to be eliminated"), is not a violation because "governments cannot be denied the right of lawful self-defense, once all peace efforts have failed." (See Catechism 2258–2330.)

6. "Neither shall you commit adultery."

Adultery is the breaking of the holy bond between husband and wife, and is thus a sacrilege. This commandment includes not just the act of adultery, but lust as well. (See Catechism 2331–2400.)

7. "Neither shall you steal."

(See Catechism 2401–2463.)

8. "Neither shall you bear false witness against your neighbor."

This commandment forbids misrepresenting the truth in relations with others. This also forbids lying. (See Catechism 2464–2513.)

9. "Neither shall you covet your neighbor's wife."

(See Catechism 2514–2533.)

10. "Neither shall you desire your neighbor's house, or field, or male or female slave, or ox, or donkey, or anything that belongs to your neighbor."

(See Catechism 2534–2557.)

The Commandments are seen as general "subject headings" for moral theology, in addition to being specific commandments in themselves. Thus, the commandment to honor father and mother is seen as a heading for a general rule to respect legitimate authority, including the authority of the state. The commandment not to commit adultery is traditionally taken to be a heading for a general rule to be sexually pure, the specific content of the purity depending, of course, on whether one is married or not. In this way, the Ten Commandments can be seen as dividing up all of morality.

[edit on 22-4-2008 by EricD]



posted on Apr, 22 2008 @ 02:44 PM
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reply to post by iammonkey
 


No one changed it, no one touches this subject ? Don't Know but that is for you as a person to decide.



posted on Apr, 22 2008 @ 03:01 PM
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reply to post by iammonkey
 


I knew a couple of very nice Catholic women. They both swear by worshipping saints. (They claim the Saints only intercede)

Both sold houses in a record amount of time, they claim, because they put inverted statues of some saint, in their front lawns by burrying them.

Now my question is, why can't they go directly to God and ask for favors?



posted on Apr, 22 2008 @ 03:06 PM
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Originally posted by darkelf
The Ten Commandments from the Talmud can be found here.

Here are the Catholic Ten Commandments.

And last but not least, the Protestant Ten Commandments here.

You decide who changed what.


Exactly. And when asked, Jesus even left out a few, himself.

Matthew 19:17-19
. . . if thou wilt enter into life, keep the commandments. He saith unto him, Which? Jesus said, Thou shalt do no murder, Thou shalt not commit adultery, Thou shalt not steal, Thou shalt not bear false witness, Honour thy father and thy mother: and, Thou shalt love thy neighbor as thyself.

So we're not even sure there were ten to begin with, or whether that was the number that just got settled on by default, because it was a good, round number.



posted on Apr, 22 2008 @ 03:15 PM
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reply to post by Enthralled Fan
 


I know protestants who go to psychics. What's your point?

Eric



posted on Apr, 22 2008 @ 04:58 PM
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reply to post by iammonkey
 


...there are multiple versions of the ten commandments in the bible, which version are you talking about?

exodus?
leviticus?
at least give me a hint



posted on Apr, 22 2008 @ 05:48 PM
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Originally posted by EricD
reply to post by Enthralled Fan
 


I know protestants who go to psychics. What's your point?

Eric


Huh? What does that have to do with the question I asked? I want to know why Catholics worship Saints instead of God. Simple question that did not need a rude reply.

It just seems very paganistic to me.



posted on Apr, 22 2008 @ 06:01 PM
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crap . . . so what happened to the sabbath day . . . i really don't want to have to work on saturdays.



posted on Apr, 22 2008 @ 06:58 PM
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Originally posted by Enthralled Fan

Originally posted by EricD
reply to post by Enthralled Fan
 


I know protestants who go to psychics. What's your point?

Eric


Huh? What does that have to do with the question I asked? I want to know why Catholics worship Saints instead of God. Simple question that did not need a rude reply.

It just seems very paganistic to me.



Let me clarify. The Church does not endorse strange rituals with icons in order to sell homes. The fact that you know two ladies who did is immaterial. Catholics do not worship saints.

If you would like to know what a particular religion teaches, go to the source. Anecdotal evidence from social acquaintances is not very meaningful. I wouldn't ascribe paying for psychics and mediums to be a Protestant practice because I know a Protestant that engages in that activity.

I did not mean for my answer to come across as harsh as it clearly did. You have my apologies.


Eric



posted on Apr, 22 2008 @ 07:04 PM
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The HEBREWS changed it! The 10 commandments comes from EGYPT first, so the question is, who changed EGYPTS laws, or adopted and changed them.... so the answer to your question.... THEY ALL DID!



posted on Apr, 22 2008 @ 07:11 PM
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reply to post by Nohup
 


nohup you seem to know much about things. do you believe in life after death !



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