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Hack sidesteps software to attack computer chips

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posted on Apr, 17 2008 @ 07:57 PM
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Hack sidesteps software to attack computer chips


www.pcadvisor.co.uk

University of Illinois researchers altered a computer chip to grant attackers back-door access to the system – a complicated hack to pull off in the real world, but one which would be virtually undetectable.

To launch its attack, the team used a special programmable processor running the Linux operating system. The chip was programmed to inject malicious firmware into the chip's memory, which then allows an attacker to log into the machine as if he were a legitimate user. To reprogramme the chip, researchers needed to alter only a tiny fraction of the processor circuits. They changed 1,341 logic gates on a chip that has more than 1 million of these gates in total, said Samuel King, an assistant professor in the university's computer science department.
(visit the link for the full news article)


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posted on Apr, 17 2008 @ 07:57 PM
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So now hackers will not only focus on screwing up your files but they can destroy your investment as well. If a processor is hacked and destroyed then there are no software replacements, you would have to buy a new processor.

Wait... New processor? Would Intel and AMD support or maybe even take part in this new abomination?



All I can say is that these Illinois researchers arn't helping us, they're proving something to hackers and a profitable route for companies.

www.pcadvisor.co.uk
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Apr, 17 2008 @ 08:24 PM
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Originally posted by die_another_day
All I can say is that these Illinois researchers arn't helping us, they're proving something to hackers and a profitable route for companies.

www.pcadvisor.co.uk
(visit the link for the full news article)



King demonstrated the attack at the Usenix Workshop on Large-Scale Exploits and Emergent Threats, a conference for security researchers held in San Francisco.


Pointing out a problem with something . Is hardly the wrong thing to do . I don't see where your frustration is coming from . 99% of the time they warn the manufacture if they refuse to acknowledge and or fix it they release it to the public.

I personally like to know what to look for when buying a product/program.

Anyway .
1. They need physical access to the hardware.
2. Theres probably



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