Red Green and Amber flashing lights in the sky

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posted on Oct, 9 2008 @ 08:19 PM
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Observed the same thing in Phoenix, AZ 07OCT2008 at 0200 local time. 'Star' in the east/southeast sky at about 30º above horizon. Flashing/twinkling was very distinct and the color rotation was predictable, red, blue, white, repeat...

Stared at it for about 5 minutes, thinking it was a helicopter over downtown PHX. Sent a text to a colleague a few miles away - he observed the same 'star' and phenom. After about 15mins, just went to bed.

Came across this thread by happenstance... just wanted to include my observation




posted on Oct, 10 2008 @ 09:54 PM
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i live in louisiana and ive been seeing the same blinking lights, they seem to flash red, blue. ive tried zooming in with my camera and my phone but they arent strong enough to pick up the image. this started about 3 months ago and since then the number of them have seemed to doubled. i tried to make myself believe it was weather balloons but i just dont get how there could be so many. i really want a logical explanation, but it doesnt look like im going to get one.



posted on Oct, 11 2008 @ 01:47 AM
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reply to post by Anonymous ATS
 


i live in ohio and have noticed this twice now within the past week.. i go outside late around 2 am and it's in the same exact spot and have not seen it in a different spot but it just felt odd.. pretty sure there's an explanation for it but i probably wouldn't understand it anyway.



posted on Oct, 11 2008 @ 02:02 AM
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Hi guys. I live in Western NY and I see a blue, red, yellow, white flashing star every night I walk home from work. Its always in the same area of the sky, and I have been seeing it for years. Have no clue what it is, and im kind of interested in astronomy. Stars twinkle, Planets don't. Nothing in the sky should flash like this, if it was moving I would write it off as a airplane, but its not.

Ive been wanting to get a nice telescope for a while but never seem to have the money. Hopefully someday I will see it up close. Tonight it seemed brighter and more active than I remember it. I've told people about it, but they never seem interested at all.



posted on Oct, 11 2008 @ 02:57 AM
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reply to post by peskyhumans
 


It would help to know the direction and time.
In the meantime you can download this free program: Stellarium

[edit on 11-10-2008 by Phage]



posted on Oct, 11 2008 @ 02:59 AM
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Originally posted by Anonymous ATS
Observed the same thing in Phoenix, AZ 07OCT2008 at 0200 local time. 'Star' in the east/southeast sky at about 30º above horizon. Flashing/twinkling was very distinct and the color rotation was predictable, red, blue, white, repeat..


Extremely likely that you're looking at Sirius. The brightest star in the sky. The color changing is called scintillation (aka twinkling).



posted on Oct, 11 2008 @ 11:11 AM
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Phage - I see the thing in the northwestern part of the sky, usually its around 1 or 2 AM when I see it. Hope this helps.



posted on Oct, 11 2008 @ 11:23 AM
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Phage - in regards to the scintillation/twinkling the way I was taught is that twinkling is the little "rays" that stars emit when you look at them, that happens because they release their own light, where as planets dont emit rays because their basically just mirrors, reflecting light, and will just appear to be little dots.

It wasn't untill a couple years back when I noticed this "blinking star" that I had ever seen what astronomers describe as scintillation (color changing). I would like to ask you though, if scintillation is caused by wind or dust why wouldn't all the stars in my sky scintillate? Im just seeing one, and its constantly.

Thanks for the feedback!



posted on Oct, 11 2008 @ 12:34 PM
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Originally posted by peskyhumans
Phage - in regards to the scintillation/twinkling the way I was taught is that twinkling is the little "rays" that stars emit when you look at them, that happens because they release their own light, where as planets dont emit rays because their basically just mirrors, reflecting light, and will just appear to be little dots.

It wasn't untill a couple years back when I noticed this "blinking star" that I had ever seen what astronomers describe as scintillation (color changing). I would like to ask you though, if scintillation is caused by wind or dust why wouldn't all the stars in my sky scintillate? Im just seeing one, and its constantly.

Thanks for the feedback!


You are probably looking at Vega, the second brightest star in the sky.

Planets actually do twinkle but the effect is much less noticeable than with stars. Stars, because they are so distant, appear as a point source of light. Planets are, from our point of view, much bigger than stars. The scintillation effect doesn't cover the whole planet, but it does cover the whole star.

Scintillation does occur with all stars but the brighter the star is, the more noticeable the effect. Watch other stars very carefully and you'll see it.

en.wikipedia.org...(astronomy)



posted on Oct, 13 2008 @ 04:56 AM
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I live in rural Northern CA, I as well as the rest of you have observed these "stars". Im not sure as to what they are, but recently within the time they appeared(about a month ago) alot of planes are flying at night. My friends and I were at a local school from about 2:00am-3:30am and in that time period we saw at least 6 planes. There are no airports nearbye, and they seem to move faster, and at a lower altitude than a passenger jet. The only airport within 250 miles is a tiny airport that at best handles crop dusters(lol). I was wondering if perhaps anyone else is seeing planes? Shooting stars are also appearing ALOT. The night sky is alarming around here as of late. I just wonder if the strange number of planes and shooting stars have any correlation with the crazy Strobe stars we seem to all be seeing.



posted on Oct, 13 2008 @ 11:58 PM
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posted on Oct, 13 2008 @ 11:58 PM
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UFOS.....i see them too and i do know a little about the topic...i speak from experience as well.... they move in zig zag formation or at random as you said....much too fast to be airlines or anything of the sort. Note that at night they are in our atmosphere observing.... the question is wut are they lookin for..
im from houston by the way.

Tim Davis



posted on Oct, 14 2008 @ 12:52 AM
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Is it possibly Polaris ?
When I first see It at 10:30 pm It is very colorful. As it gets higher all the reds blues greens and yellows, have faded out to a bluewhite.

I am in Michigan looking slightly Northwest.



posted on Oct, 14 2008 @ 02:43 AM
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It could be. Im looking about northwest, and its not like im carrying a compass around with me
. So we could be seeing the same star.

Thanks Phage for the info, you've been really helpful (and patient) explaining scintillation to everybody. I never remember seeing scintillation when I was little, so this cleared up a lot of confusion for me. I wonder if pollution affects it at all, that might explain why its growing more noticable.



posted on Oct, 14 2008 @ 03:56 AM
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reply to post by azureskys
 


Polaris is not visually noteworthy (by brightness) at all. It's about the 48th brightest star in the night sky. It is noteworthy because it marks the celestial north pole and it appears to hardly move at all during the night. Polaris will always be seen in relatively the same area of the night sky no matter the time. It is simple to find if you can also see the constellation Ursa Major. Check the external diagram below.



Are you sure you're looking northwest? From what I can tell, all stars in the northwest sky appear to move closer to the horizon (lower) as the night gets later. The star Vega would be very visible looking northwest at 10:30pm, but i don't think it would appear to rise as time went by; it would actually appear to lower. If you're looking north; a star would have to be east of north (and Polaris) to appear to rise as it gets later in the evening. That's why I'm a little confused about your directions. Are you sure you didn't mean northeast? Because if you meant northeast; the star Capella fits the description of what you are seeing at 10:30pm. Capella is the 5th brightest star in the sky. It is very noticeable, and is almost 6 times brighter than Polaris. Capella will also appear to rise as it gets later in the night. You can locate it by extending a line from the two stars that make up the handle of Ursa Major. The external diagram below is kinda hard to follow but it should give an idea of what I mean.




posted on Oct, 15 2008 @ 10:32 AM
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Ive been seeing it too in Florida, If I look at with my eyes only
it looks really, really bright, flashing and stationary. When i look
at it through binoculars it seems to be moving and flashing colors.

Last night I was taking pictures of the full moon

[img]
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I saw the bright flashing star again, so I thought I would take a picture
here it is in the sky normal as I was looking at it...

[img]
[/img]

here it is cropped and sharpened so I could get a closer look at it.


[img]
[/img]

I wish I had a good telescope



posted on Oct, 15 2008 @ 03:46 PM
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reply to post by leeza
 


Leeza, cool pics. What time and in what direction do you see this flashing object? When you were taking those great shots of the moon, where was the flashing object in relation to the moon?

Did you see the video clip posted by waveguide3 on page 2 in this thread?
Twinkling Star
It looks pretty wild huh? But it's just a star seen through a large telescope while messing with the focus. It certainly appears to be moving too, but it is not.

[edit on 15-10-2008 by Boognish]



posted on Oct, 15 2008 @ 04:15 PM
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I see this same star nightly in Arkansas,
I've built some what of a relationship with the star, seeing it and pointing out to friends nightly...
Its a mystery to me..

I've done a little research that says it is due to its posistion so low on the horizon that makes the light waves bend and your eye picks them up at an off timing leading to the different colors, but their are others stars lower on the horizon that do not change colors.

So the mystery continues I suspect



posted on Oct, 15 2008 @ 04:25 PM
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reply to post by jwood1440
 


It wouldn't be a mystery if you would simply post the time and direction you saw the star. It would be very easy to figure out what it is.



posted on Oct, 16 2008 @ 02:01 PM
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Originally posted by Boognish
reply to post by leeza
 


Leeza, cool pics. What time and in what direction do you see this flashing object? When you were taking those great shots of the moon, where was the flashing object in relation to the moon?

Did you see the video clip posted by waveguide3 on page 2 in this thread?
Twinkling Star
It looks pretty wild huh? But it's just a star seen through a large telescope while messing with the focus. It certainly appears to be moving too, but it is not.

[edit on 15-10-2008 by Boognish]


It was between 8:30-9:00 p.m
The moon was in the east, & the star was in the west, so if I looked left there was the moon and when I looked right there was the star.

I'll go check out that link

That is really cool, I would love to play with a telescope, My MIL
has one, maybe I could borrow it for a few days.

[edit on 16-10-2008 by leeza]





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