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Lander Zeroes in On Martian North Pole

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posted on May, 23 2008 @ 04:34 AM
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I'm really looking forward to this!

Does anyone know if any channel available in the uk will be broadcasting live coverage?

Discovery scienence has some programs about mars on but not the actual coverage.




posted on May, 23 2008 @ 01:42 PM
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You can watch online fatdeeman, on NASA TV

You'll notice the three channels on the upper right corner.

According to the schedule below the live coverage will start on the Media Channel and
continue on the Public Channel.


NASA TV coverage schedule

2008
May

May 24, Saturday
3 p.m. - Mars Phoenix Lander Briefing - Landing Preview - JPL (Public and Media Channels)

May 25, Sunday
3 p.m. - Mars Phoenix Lander Briefing - JPL (Public and Media Channels)
6 p.m. - Mars Phoenix Lander Landing Coverage - JPL (Media Channel)
6:30 - 8:45 p.m. - Mars Phoenix Lander Landing Coverage - JPL (Public Channel)
9:30 p.m. - Mars Phoenix Lander Briefing - First Downlink of Data - JPL (Public and Media Channels)


And here's the link to the online blogs of some of the project scientists.
Usually good for picking up interesting behind the scenes data and anecdotes,
that don't neccessarily get to the MSM.

Project Blogs






[edit on 23-5-2008 by Jbird]



posted on May, 24 2008 @ 12:48 AM
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Polygons at the Phoenix Landing Site




One of the reasons this region of Mars was selected for the landing site is based on the overall lack of rocks that could prove hazardous to the lander. Among the many science goals, Phoenix will analyze the surface dust as well as dig into an ice-rich layer which is predicted to lie within inches of the Martian surface.

The polygons are most likely the result of temperature oscillations which cause this ice to crack resulting in the surface that is visible today.


Source


Seven Minutes of Terror: Landing Day for Phoenix (VIDEO)

[edit on 24-5-2008 by Enceladus]



posted on May, 24 2008 @ 01:36 AM
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Nice job on this thread!

My first memories of Mars exploration were the Viking Orbiter/Lander missions.
The only source of imagery was TV, or a Newspaper. Then later, a National Geographic Magazine.

Look how much data we have now!
I spend a lot of time cruising the JPL sites.
These days, the ability to take a peek at dozens of other worlds is at our fingertips. We're truly spoiled!

I have to admit that I get a little nervous for those JPL people on landing days.
All those years, all that work, distilled to a few minutes as the lander hurtles in, popping off all it's protective gear. Then, a soft landing. We hope.



posted on May, 24 2008 @ 02:11 AM
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reply to post by spacedoubt
 


Yes it will be a tensed moment for many people around the world and all we can do is hope for the best.

Just another update

UCF Invention Onboard Phoenix Mars Lander Will Reveal True Colors


When NASA's Phoenix lander touches down on Mars Sunday, it will be carrying two special tools to give scientists their best look at the Red Planet's true colors.

They're called color-calibration targets and are about the size of hockey pucks. Each device is covered with color chips, designed by University of Central Florida Physics and Astronomy Professor Dan Britt and two students. When Phoenix's camera takes pictures of the terrain, it will also capture the calibration targets, allowing scientists to compare the colors in each photo and determine the actual hues.


Source



posted on May, 24 2008 @ 05:08 AM
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reply to post by fatdeeman
 


Well last time with the 2 rovers you could follow the landing live on nasa tv - it was very exciting
then after landing the news channels like sky & bbc started coverage.



[edit on 24-5-2008 by yeti101]



posted on May, 24 2008 @ 10:03 AM
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reply to post by Jbird
 


I was going to watch it online anyway I was just hoping there would be some way of watching it on the big screen!

Thanks anyway for that info, I'll check out the blogs.



posted on May, 24 2008 @ 12:33 PM
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reply to post by yeti101
 


Problem is I wasn't as interested back then which is a real shame because I would have liked to have seen all that going on live



posted on May, 24 2008 @ 12:51 PM
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Will the landing be on regular broadcast TV, CBS, ABC, NBC etc.?

No got satellite or cable TV.



posted on May, 24 2008 @ 03:08 PM
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During NASA's Phoenix Lander Press Conference on Saturday (shown on NASA TV online), one of the team members mentioned that this will be the first time a NASA probe has "touched the water" on Mars -- meaning they soil samples they collect are expected to conatin water ice...

...I always knew that they haven't yet visually confirmed the presence of water nor directly detected it, but when he said this I was struck by the idea that this lander will actually take a sample of water on Mars (albeit in ice form until it melts). I think that is a pretty cool and profound thought.



posted on May, 25 2008 @ 02:24 AM
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Originally posted by Soylent Green Is People
... "touched the water" on Mars --...

I think that is a pretty cool and profound thought.


We're Ridin' the same Train (of thought) there, mate.

Contact with another planet, in any form, is awe inspiring IMO.

And the promise of not only scientific returns,
but a(nother) virtual window to another world, is mesmerizing.

(And of course the caboose on this train would be a successful
demonstration of "rockets landing backwards". )





Originally posted by spacedoubt
...nervous for those JPL people on landing days


I'm on board with that, as well, space'.
Although the human risk is absent on this one, the do or die aspect of landings ,
brings back the anxiousness of the Apollo days.

There's no 'almost' in Space Landings.

*Fingers crossed*



posted on May, 25 2008 @ 02:44 AM
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I am really pleased this is happening, as my name implies I am curious as ever. I will be looking forward to hearing more.

Oh and its been on the news here in the UK all morning.



posted on May, 25 2008 @ 04:32 PM
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Does anyone have any specs handy regarding the surface imager on the lander such as resolution etc.?



posted on May, 25 2008 @ 04:39 PM
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Originally posted by WhatTheory
Does anyone have any specs handy regarding the surface imager on the lander such as resolution etc.?


I think this is reffering to the phoenix surface stereo imager...

www.met.tamu.edu...



posted on May, 25 2008 @ 06:10 PM
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It's all live on NASA TV right now!!



posted on May, 25 2008 @ 06:38 PM
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Also coverage on CNN with Miles Obrian, since 4pm EST.

Appears it will continue until touchdown.



posted on May, 25 2008 @ 06:39 PM
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We have confirmation of seperation between the lander module and the orbiter module. The lander module is now on its way to it's 7 minute decent to the surface of mars.
So far so good.



posted on May, 25 2008 @ 06:42 PM
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Watching NASA TV Right now.

Does anyone know if this will be broadcast in COLOUR or not ( and if so, i wonder how much they're gonna tint it 'red'
).

SEPRATION ALL GOOD...kewl!!!

Cheers


AoN



posted on May, 25 2008 @ 06:46 PM
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Phoenix has now entered the upper Martian atmosphere. About 7 minutes to touchdown.



posted on May, 25 2008 @ 06:50 PM
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We now have confirmation of parachute deployment. About 3 1/2 minutes to touchdown.



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