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Amazing new photos of Phobos

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posted on Apr, 9 2008 @ 05:03 PM
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These Amazing new photos of Phobos and it's impact crater Stickney were taken by The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO)


Phobos

Stickney crater


www.space.com...

The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) angled in as close as 3,600 miles (5,800 kilometers) to eye Phobos in detail. Two similar images taken from different distances were combined to give the perception of a 3-D view.


Just Wow ! Article says there have been closer photos, by Mars Global Surveyor, but the High-Rise camera
makes all the difference, collecting much more data.


 

edit to add link to High Rez versions:

hirise.lpl.arizona.edu...



[edit on 13-4-2008 by Jbird]




posted on Apr, 9 2008 @ 05:57 PM
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Yes, those photos are great, that is why I am collecting them all.


It's interesting to see that Phobos looks like it was "extracted" from somewhere, it almost looks like a bullet with the barrel markings.



posted on Apr, 9 2008 @ 06:16 PM
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These are some of the best photo's doing the rounds. Great Find



posted on Apr, 9 2008 @ 06:34 PM
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reply to post by ArMaP
 


Yes , a good analogy, bullet markings.

IIRC, the grooves are now believed to be carved by ejecta from collisions with the leading apex of the moon, which is near the Stickney Crater.

Here's a comparative shot from the MGS in '98.


Phobos 1998




[edit on 9-4-2008 by Jbird]



posted on Apr, 10 2008 @ 01:01 AM
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Wow! great find; never seen Phobos so close; What are those cracks like lines on the moon? how did they form? The whole moon looks similar to a nutshell; in the second photo see that that small crater on the bigger crater, so fresh and sharp it is. Just feel like sitting on this small moon and make a trip around Mars



posted on Apr, 10 2008 @ 01:09 AM
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Some of the high resolution pictures and details can be obtained here

Click here



posted on Apr, 10 2008 @ 01:32 AM
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Sorry for the one line here, but anyone knows something about Deimos? has it been fotographed yet?
any clues anyboddy?



posted on Apr, 10 2008 @ 10:55 AM
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reply to post by Jim.Hero
 


You know that's a good point, I can't recall any really nice shots of Deimos.
I'm sure they're out there though.



posted on Apr, 10 2008 @ 12:06 PM
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I've tried too. This is the best that I have found.


www.astronomie.nl...

www.bibalex.org...



posted on Apr, 10 2008 @ 12:57 PM
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Those are just stunning, jbird. The contrast of the colors is amazing. Are the lighter, almost white areas ice? Looks like someone just took a big scoop out of it.



posted on Apr, 10 2008 @ 01:18 PM
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Beautiful...

It looks just too sharp though...

Looks like it was made in 3DStudio Max...

Im not saying its a fake, but, that just looks unreal... in a good way....



posted on Apr, 10 2008 @ 02:17 PM
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That must be one helluva solid piece of rock to take a hit like that, I would like to know what it's make up is, fantastic photo/image.

Wolfie



posted on Apr, 10 2008 @ 02:23 PM
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Starred and flagged ! Thanks for those awesome pics !

Cheers !



posted on Apr, 10 2008 @ 05:35 PM
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Looks like a Martian ATV park!

Somebody or something has been driving all over that rock!


Seriously, very kewl pics, Jbird, nice find!

S&F!



posted on Apr, 10 2008 @ 05:42 PM
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reply to post by TKainZero
 


You're on the right track TKZ, with the 3-D idea.

From the original link - (bolded mine)


The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) angled in as close as 3,600 miles (5,800 kilometers) to eye Phobos in detail. Two similar images taken from different distances were combined to give the perception of a 3-D view.




[edit on 10-4-2008 by Jbird]



posted on Apr, 10 2008 @ 05:49 PM
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Originally posted by Enceladus
...What are those cracks like lines on the moon? how did they form? ...


From Wiki - (bolded mine)


Many grooves and streaks also cover the oddly shaped surface. The grooves are typically less than 30 m deep, 100 to 200 m wide, and up to 20 km in length, and were originally assumed to have been the result of the same impact that created Stickney. Analysis of results from the Mars Express spacecraft, however, revealed that the grooves are not in fact radial to Stickney, but are centered on the leading apex of Phobos in its orbit (which is not far from Stickney), and must have been excavated by material ejected into space by impacts on the surface of Mars.[22] The grooves thus formed as crater chains, and all of them fade away as the trailing apex of Phobos is approached. They have been grouped into 12 or more families of varying age, presumably representing at least 12 Martian impact events



posted on Apr, 11 2008 @ 12:40 AM
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reply to post by Jbird
 


Thanks for the information Jbird; I was just wondering how much effect this impact would have made on the moon; Considering the size of the moon and the Stickney impact crater I am sure the impact would have altered its orbit path.

Further, how come something could target such a small object? when it has very low gravity and its orbiting path is very close to Mars, which has got more gravity to drag anything comes that close.



posted on Apr, 11 2008 @ 12:45 AM
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Those really are some awesome pictures.



posted on Apr, 11 2008 @ 12:47 AM
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Hiyah JBird...

Great find!! Amazing photographs for sure, thanks for sharing them with us! I love when people put their finds on here since I don't have enough patience to go looking through all the photos myself
Good job



posted on Apr, 11 2008 @ 11:26 AM
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Originally posted by Enceladus
...Further, how come something could target such a small object? when it has very low gravity and its orbiting path is very close to Mars, which has got more gravity to drag anything comes that close.


Could it be possible the impact that caused the Stickney crater actually allowed Phobos to be captured by Mars, as opposed to Phobos being impacted while already in orbit?

I know there is some mystery surrounding the Mars moons' origin, but haven't really researched it.


Wiki
The origin of the Martian moons is still controversial.[25] Phobos and Deimos both have much in common with carbonaceous C-type asteroids, with spectra, albedos and densities very similar to those of C- or D-type asteroids.[10] Based on this similarity, one hypothesis is that both moons may have been captured into Martian orbit from the main asteroid belt



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