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35,000 year old tools found in Australian

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posted on Apr, 7 2008 @ 05:22 PM
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ANCIENT Aboriginal tools found on a Pilbara mine site in Western Australia have been dated at 35,000 years — among the oldest so far discovered in Australia.




Archaeologists believe the dig could yield material up to 40,000 years old, comparable with the internationally famous Lake Mungo Man discovery in NSW
.



Tools




posted on Apr, 7 2008 @ 05:30 PM
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Originally posted by Hanslune



ANCIENT Aboriginal tools found on a Pilbara mine site in Western Australia have been dated at 35,000 years — among the oldest so far discovered in Australia.




Archaeologists believe the dig could yield material up to 40,000 years old, comparable with the internationally famous Lake Mungo Man discovery in NSW
.



Tools


This will be the biggest blunder for Australia, the Artifact Mafias will now swoop into Australia like innocent tourists, hire the original Aboriginal people to dig these same Graves for few dollars like how they looted the Baghdad Museum for Artifacts which are now in New York....Hallalooyah....Wake the Aboriginal Spirits, they will haunt them down.



posted on Apr, 7 2008 @ 06:28 PM
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reply to post by Hanslune
 


It was just a matter of time. Its good to see archaeology is catching up to
genetics, which indicates that people migrated into Australia sometime
after the Mt. Toba Super-eruption and about 65,000 BC.

www.bradshawfoundation.com...

cormac



posted on Apr, 7 2008 @ 06:34 PM
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reply to post by Dubyakadubla
 


Actually the aborigines own most of that land and lease it back to the government or the mining operators.
There have been a lot of changes to the law regarding aboriginal sites in the Northern Territory and WA in the past few years, particularly sites discovered on mining leases, and there is no way anyone will be getting in there to pinch artifacts.
You have to get permission from the aborigines just to drive through their land and its pretty remote, so short of mounting an Indiana Jones expedition ain't nobody getting in there without permission.


mojo.



posted on Apr, 7 2008 @ 07:11 PM
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I'm not sure if the international market for Australian Aborigine materials is very strong. Usually pottery and more elaborate art is more sough than just stone tools. With the rise of a modern stone tool making (Crabtree etc) the manufacture of "fake flakes" is now easier.



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