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Everybody in Los Angeles is a DRUG FIEND

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posted on Apr, 5 2008 @ 01:27 PM
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[color=gold]Everybody in Los Angeles is a DRUG FIEND


People in Los Angeles (LA) are druggies, they are taking drugs that have the following effects:

• Calming and Anti-Anxiety effects
• Muscle Relaxant effects
• Mood Stabilization effects
• Reduction of Brain Electrical Activity effects


These are the drugs being consumed:

Equanil®
(aka: Miltown® by Wallace Laboratories, Equanil® by Wyeth, and Meprospan®)

Dilantin®
(aka: Kapseals®, Infatabs®, Eptoin® by Abbott Group in India and as Epanutin®)


Let me explain:

►The above drugs, brand names and effects are from the following compounds found in the Los Angeles DRINKING WATER SUPPLY during an independent water analysis conducted in the city of Los Angeles as well as in 28 other cities and towns in the USA. The testing was conducted by independent researchers and the findings say that 24 out of 28 cities tested show drinking water have at least one type of pharmaceutical in them.

[color=gold]24 major metropolitan areas tested (positive) for pharmaceuticals

►In the case of LA, 2 drugs were found, those being Phenytoin and Meprobamate. In the cities tested, both prescription and non-prescription drugs were detected. Some of the tests only tested for certain drugs, while other tests were more comprehensive.

1. Phenytoin-Phenytoin sodium is a commonly used antiepileptic. It was approved by the Food and Drug Administration in 1953 for use in seizures. Phenytoin acts to damp the unwanted, runaway brain activity seen in seizure by reducing electrical conductance among brain cells by stabilizing the inactive state of voltage gated sodium channels.


There are some indications that phenytoin has other effects, including anxiety control and mood stabilization, although it has never been approved for those purposes by the FDA. Jack Dreyfus became a major proponent of phenytoin as a means to control nervousness and depression..he is believed to have supplied large amounts of the drug to Richard Nixon. Dreyfus' book about his experience with phenytoin, "A Remarkable Medicine Has Been Overlooked", sits on the shelves of many physicians courtesy of the work of his foundation.

(marketed as Phenytek® by Mylan Laboratories, previously Bertek Pharmaceuticals, and Dilantin®; also Dilantin® Kapseals® and Dilantin® Infatabs® in the USA, Eptoin® by Abbott Group in India and as Epanutin® in the UK and Israel, by Parke-Davis, now part of Pfizer)


2. Meprobamate-is used as an anxiolytic drug. It was the best-selling minor tranquilizer for a quite some time. It has also been used off-label as a sedative.

(marketed under the brand names Miltown® by Wallace Laboratories, Equanil® by Wyeth, and Meprospan®)


» Let's take a look at the listing of cities and the drugs found in their water supplies:


• Arlington, Texas: 1 (unspecified pharmaceutical)
• Atlanta: 3 (acetaminophen, caffeine and cotinine)
• Cincinnati: 1 (caffeine)
• Columbus, Ohio: 5 (azithromycin, roxithromycin, tylosin, virginiamycin and caffeine)
• Concord, Calif.: 2 (meprobamate and sulfamethoxazole)
• Denver: (unspecified antibiotics)
• Detroit: (unspecified drugs)
• Indianapolis: 1 (caffeine)
• Las Vegas: 3 (carbamazepine, meprobamate and phenytoin)
• Long Beach, Calif.: 2 (meprobamate and phenytoin)
• Los Angeles: 2 (meprobamate and phenytoin)
• Louisville, Ky.: 3 (caffeine, carbamazepine and phenytoin)
• Milwaukee: 1 (cotinine)
• Minneapolis: 1 (caffeine)
• New Orleans: 3 (clofibric acid, estrone and naproxen)
• Northern New Jersey: 7 (caffeine, carbamazepine, codeine, cotinine, dehydronifedipine, diphenhydramine and sulfathiazole)
• Philadelphia: 56 (including amoxicillin, azithromycin, carbamazepine, diclofenac, prednisone and tetracycline)
• Portland, Ore.: 4 (acetaminophen, caffeine, ibuprofen and sulfamethoxazole)
• Riverside County, Calif.: 2 (meprobamate and phenytoin)
• San Diego: 3 (ibuprofen, meprobamate and phenytoin)
• San Francisco: 1 (estradiol)
• Southern California: 2 (meprobamate and phenytoin)
• Tucson, Ariz.: 3 (carbamazepine, dehydronifedipine and sulfamethoxazole)
• Washington, D.C.: 6 (carbamazepine, caffeine, ibuprofen, monensin, naproxen and sulfamethoxazole)


►What are all of these drugs doing in our water supply? This isn't even comprehensive testing for pharmaceuticals either, some tests in cities were only for certian drugs. I wonder what a full list of drugs would look like?

►What does this mean, what do these drugs in our water do to us and why are they there? These and many other questions come to mind. Perhaps by looking at what effects these drugs produce, or by looking at the 'category' these drugs fall into, or look at the general big picture of the drugs and there effects can we make some conclusions?

►So LA has drugs contained in the water that have calming, anti-anxiety, anti-brain activity and mood stabilization effects. If someone is purposely adding these drugs to the water, why? Well LA, besides being know for Hollywood, the beach, celebs, Beverly Hills etc, pertaining to this discussion, is also known for the LA riots in 1992, known as the Rodney King Riots and the 1965 WATTS riot in Los Angeles. Could it be that the city planners (possibly stemming from a higher agenda as well?) want to quell any future violence by illegally adding these drugs the water, effectively drugging all of LA? Now unless someone has a giant presciption card writing capability, I would say this drugging is quite illegal.


» Let's look at some other cities...

►San Francisco. Now before I explain the drug in SF's water, I ask: Political correctness aside, what kind of a drug would you say might be in that citys water supply illegally?

Come up with an answer yet? Read about the drug that was found in the San Francisco water supply.

Estradiol-Estradiol (also oestradiol) is a sex hormone. Mislabelled the "female" hormone, it is also present in males; it represents the major estrogen in humans. Estradiol has not only a critical impact on reproductive and sexual functioning, but also affects other organs including bone structure.

►Continued Below◄

*Staff Edit - Added External Tags To Portions of Post*

[edit on 4/5/08 by niteboy82]




posted on Apr, 5 2008 @ 01:28 PM
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[color=gold]Everybody in Los Angeles is a DRUG FIEND


►Continued from Above◄

Ok I bet some of you are saying, ok this has to be a joke right? I mean is it still April 1st, April Fools Day or something?

Sometime truth (and hidden truth) is stranger than fiction. I can't make this stuff up. Estradiol was found in the water supply and it is not a drug per se (correct me here if I'm wrong) but is a hormone, a female one.

Strange right. Why put this into the water? Is it for males or for the females? Good questions, don't know the answers. But can glean some maybe:




Sexual development

The development of secondary sex characteristics in women is driven by estrogens, specifically estradiol. These changes are initiated at the time of puberty, most enhanced during the reproductive years, and become less pronounced with declining estradiol support after the menopause.

Thus, estradiol enhances breast development, and is responsible for changes in the body shape affecting bones, joints, fat deposition. Fat structure and skin composition are modified by estradiol.


...also from same source:


Male reproduction

The effect of estradiol (and estrogens) upon male reproduction is complex. Estradiol is produced in the Sertoli cells of the testes. There is evidence that estradiol is to prevent apoptosis of male germ cells. [1]

Several studies have noted that sperm counts have been declining in many parts of the world and it has been postulated that this may be related to estrogen exposure in the environment. Suppression of estradiol production in a subpopulation of subfertile men may improve the semen analysis.[3]



¤ ¤ ¤ ¤ ¤ ¤ ¤ ¤


[color=gold]CONCLUSIONS

No conclusion as yet, ongoing study, still need lots more work into this subject. ATS members are encouraged to dig further. I do not have the time to go into the other drugs right now, but wanted to release what I have found on the topic. Please ALL continue my research into this and post your results. List the other drug effects, list other water sampling done nationwide etc.

Thanks for your time and reading.


¤ ¤ ¤ ¤ ¤ ¤ ¤ ¤

References:

ap.google.com...
www.bu.edu...
www.msnbc.msn.com...
thelede.blogs.nytimes.com...
en.wikipedia.org...
www.wtop.com...

Other ATS threads on flouride, other chems in water:

www.abovetopsecret.com...
www.abovetopsecret.com...

*Staff Edit - Added Links To Sources of External Quotes*

[edit on 4/5/08 by niteboy82]

[edit on 5-4-2008 by battlestargalactica]



posted on Apr, 5 2008 @ 02:40 PM
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Yea I remeber seing a news report about this.I wonder where all these come from?Although I dont think they are put there on purpose,I might be wrong-but we cant assume everything we here is some "conspiracy"thats just straight paranoia.

Ok for the Meprobamate(Equanil):It is a schedual IV controlled substance and is a minor traquilizer.Soma(Wallace labs)is a muscle relaxent(Carisoprodal)that is quickly metabolized into Meprobamate in your system.

For the Cotinine that is a derivative of Nictotine and an Anagram of it aswell(for what thats worth)

As the Dilantin goes,like you said it is used to control seziures.

Alot of the other drugs published were OTC(Acetaminophen,Naproxen,Caffine,Diphenhydramine(Benydril))

Were there any narcotics?(Codiene,Hydrocodone,Oxycodone,Morphine,Meperdine,etc)

I would guess this is do to the US's old sewage systems,but I dont know.



posted on Apr, 5 2008 @ 03:05 PM
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Yes, maybe malfeasance, maybe not, in the meantime let's continue to dig around.

Just notice 56 pharmaceuticals in Philadelphia water! Thats just absurd. One thing I am not able to find is the concentrations of each particular drug in the tested samples. From this we can extrapolate the dosage that an average person would get from drinking 6-8 glasses of water per day.

Also, caffeine is a derivative of some other drugs and is an indicator of other drugs not tested for in the sample. So the test may have screened for caffeine only, just to indicate other compounds in the water. Or the test results may not have been fully disclosed, only giving us an indication of other compounds in the water.

[edit on 5-4-2008 by battlestargalactica]



posted on Apr, 5 2008 @ 03:14 PM
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Also, caffeine is a derivative of some other drugs and is an indicator of other drugs


Could you explain the other drugs it is a indicator of?I know Caffine is in alot of Rx combination drugs,is that what you are saying?I only ask because I am pre med in college and plan on being an Anesthiesiologist and know already quite a bit about pharmaceutical drugs.


Also what is your opinion of why they are in the wter supply??



****by the way post starred and flagged.



posted on Apr, 5 2008 @ 03:23 PM
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These drugs are in the water supply because they are excreted from the bodies of those who take them. I haven't seen any evidence that they are in the water supply in sufficient concentrations to have negative consequences for human health.



posted on Apr, 5 2008 @ 03:31 PM
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Originally posted by whitecastle
These drugs are in the water supply because they are excreted from the bodies of those who take them. I haven't seen any evidence that they are in the water supply in sufficient concentrations to have negative consequences for human health.

Thanks for the information, can you kindly post your sources of information on concentration levels of various drugs, I have not seen this data, and since you evidently have, please post it, I am looking for this data.

Also I know of no one taking most of these drugs, except of course for the common ones, that's a lot of people taking these drugs and excreted as waste to show up in a filtered and purified and treated water supply. Besides the fact that there are two issues here:

1) Effect of these drugs in our water supply (regardless how they got there). They are evident in sampling of water, so what effects people consuming these compounds are there.

2) How these drugs got there (Is it from shoddy or incomplete treatment Do we need tighter controls on treatment plants? or is it placed there by unknown reason?)



[edit on 5-4-2008 by battlestargalactica]



posted on Apr, 5 2008 @ 03:34 PM
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reply to post by battlestargalactica
 


All I'm saying is that I do not know of any data to suggest the concentrations are harmful. You're implying that you do, why don't you provide us with such data?



posted on Apr, 5 2008 @ 03:34 PM
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Originally posted by whitecastle
I haven't seen any evidence that they are in the water supply in sufficient concentrations to have negative consequences for human health.


Nor do i sea any reason to belive that over time, having prolonged exposure to these drugs, will not have an effect.

I wonder How other parts of the world fare in a survey of thie drinkning water.

Could our Messed up Water supply, be the reason for much of Americas Insane behavior latly...



posted on Apr, 5 2008 @ 03:36 PM
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Well since I believe your refering to urination and traces of the drugs being passed that way-you do know that after your body metabolizes drugs that the intial drug itself is gone,what is left are metabolites of the drug,so I guess you still could be right,but why is it suddenly a problem now?



posted on Apr, 5 2008 @ 03:37 PM
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reply to post by TKainZero
 


Why would these drugs have a prolonged effect over time? They are broken down by the body into inert compounds just like food is. It's like drinking a beer-after awhile the beer has no effect whatsoever.

I have never seen any evidence that minute traces of these drugs can harm people, and the drugs do not build up in the body over time.



posted on Apr, 5 2008 @ 03:38 PM
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reply to post by jkrog08
 


It's not a problem, jkrog, this is a very old "issue" that scaremongers are bringing up to snatch the spotlight.



posted on Apr, 5 2008 @ 03:41 PM
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Yea I personally dont think anything about it,but it isnt nice to know that these drugs stil get recirculated in our water supply.



posted on Apr, 5 2008 @ 03:43 PM
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Originally posted by whitecastle
All I'm saying is that I do not know of any data to suggest the concentrations are harmful. You're implying that you do, why don't you provide us with such data?


I'm implying nothing, I STATED that I do not have this data and am looking for some concentration data here:


Originally posted by battlestargalactica
One thing I am not able to find is the concentrations of each particular drug in the tested samples. From this we can extrapolate the dosage that an average person would get from drinking 6-8 glasses of water per day.


You had stated that you have not seen any data that these drugs are harmful in the concentrations :


Originally posted by whitecastle
I haven't seen any evidence that they are in the water supply in sufficient concentrations to have negative consequences for human health.


In sufficient concentrations? So you are implying you have seen data on the amounts/concentrations of drugs in the water, just not in sufficient amounts? Can we see some of your data please? Or are you just 'sayin' stuff off the top of your head?



posted on Apr, 5 2008 @ 03:48 PM
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reply to post by battlestargalactica
 


Without such data, how can you back up your confident assertion that "everyone in Los Angeles is a drug fiend"? Quite simply, you can't. To be a drug fiend, one must be getting high on drugs. But you, so far, have no evidence to even demonstrate that these drugs are doing anything at all.



posted on Apr, 5 2008 @ 03:51 PM
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reply to post by battlestargalactica
 


Okay, you've listed a bunch of drugs.

Now, do you know their concentrations? That's what we need to worry about.



posted on Apr, 5 2008 @ 03:54 PM
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reply to post by whitecastle
 

There is no evidence that it ISN'T harmful either. The study by associated Press (AP) shows pharmaceutical compounds in water sampling in 24 out of 28 cities.

People ingest this water through drinking and cooking. What are the effects of these compounds on the body? Where are they coming from? In what concentrations? These are the questions. If you have answers please post them.

You're saying that since you personally haven't seen evidence of any negative effects isn't really saying much is it? Have you seen any documents or evidence where these drugs are said to be safe for humans to ingest?



[edit on 5-4-2008 by battlestargalactica]



posted on Apr, 5 2008 @ 04:01 PM
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reply to post by battlestargalactica
 


I found this article to be highly informative:
www.cnn.com...



To be sure, the concentrations of these pharmaceuticals are tiny, measured in quantities of parts per billion or trillion, far below the levels of a medical dose. Also, utilities insist their water is safe.


I won't deny that more research needs to be done, but at the present there is no evidence to suggest these minute concentrations are negatively impacting health.



posted on Apr, 5 2008 @ 04:09 PM
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reply to post by whitecastle
 


That article that you quote is the same one that I listed in my reference list in my original post from AP/google..in that same article:

Continuing where you left off:


But the presence of so many prescription drugs — and over-the-counter medicines like acetaminophen and ibuprofen — in so much of our drinking water is heightening worries among scientists of long-term consequences to human health.



Another issue: There's evidence that adding chlorine, a common process in conventional drinking water treatment plants, makes some pharmaceuticals more toxic.


And who knows the long term effects of these drugs mixed together on such a large number of people millions of people, being subjected to drugs of unknown interaction.

Also in your quote of my referenced article you may have missed:


And while researchers do not yet understand the exact risks from decades of persistent exposure to random combinations of low levels of pharmaceuticals, recent studies — which have gone virtually unnoticed by the general public — have found alarming effects on human cells and wildlife.


So now you CAN say that you have seen reports of these drugs in our water as being possibly harmful.


In addition, you are quoting officials (I'm assuming water officials) are stating that the water supplies are safe..

Of course they say that, not only to avoid an uproar within their district but because it is safe -- that is according to regulations setup by the FDA on contamination and water testing requirements and risks -- these FDA regulations do not have any pharmaceutical testing requirements within them, in other words: They are oblivious to and do not mandate testing for ANY drugs.


City water officials declined repeated requests for an interview. In a statement, they insisted that "New York City's drinking water continues to meet all federal and state regulations regarding drinking water quality in the watershed and the distribution system" — regulations that do not address trace pharmaceuticals.


[edit on 5-4-2008 by battlestargalactica]



posted on Apr, 5 2008 @ 04:12 PM
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It's all intentional. You've got to keep all the humans that live in these large sprawling metropolitan cities sedated and tranquilized, or they could all suddenly freak out once they realize they are wasting way their vain lives stuck in long traffic jams, long check-out register lines, etc. It is a matter of national security. Drink the water, it's bliss.

BTW, I hear L.A. has gold medal-winning municipal water. (obviously all that stuff in it made the judges feel good about drinking it).



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