It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Boomerang works in space, says astronaut

page: 1
1

log in

join
share:

posted on Apr, 3 2008 @ 12:42 PM
link   
hello

this is a couple of weeks old and if it has been posted previously im sorry

IN an unprecedented experiment, a Japanese astronaut has thrown a boomerang in space and confirmed it flies back much like on Earth.

www.news.com.au...

excuse my ignorance on this but should this happen in a vacuum?

many thanks

david




posted on Apr, 3 2008 @ 12:53 PM
link   
i'm as ignorant as you are if nothing else. i assumed it was the way it interacted with air that made it eventually curve back. it would somehow need to perpetually change its trajectory...without some mechanism in the object or an outside force, i can't see how it's possible. the fact that it's lopsided will just make it spin around some center of gravity that may not be expected, but it should still fly straight.

interesting if true.

[edit on 3-4-2008 by an0maly33]



posted on Apr, 3 2008 @ 12:55 PM
link   
Now that is interesting...

Where are all the physics geeks when we need them? I would have thought it would have just kept sailing in the direction it was thrown.

Can't wait to see the video the article says will be released soon.



posted on Apr, 3 2008 @ 12:57 PM
link   
or if you throw a boomerang upwards, it will go (back) down.



posted on Apr, 3 2008 @ 01:04 PM
link   
It's the shape of the boomerang and how it's released from the hand. Just as a gyroscope works in a vacuum, so does a boomerang. A disc would proceed in the initial direction, but the angled line of the boomerang generates a broader directional force loop that extends beyond the edge of the matter comprising the boomerang. The emptiness on the inside edge of the boomerang alters its vortex and instead of a tight continuum, it is lopsided, "magically" directing the boomerangs course.

EDIT: School is cool! thanks johnsky

[edit on 3-4-2008 by depth om]



posted on Apr, 3 2008 @ 01:06 PM
link   
Ah, I see the miscommunication here...

He threw it INSIDE the international space station, he did not throw it in a vacuum.

Obviously, the international space station contains air, a mixture of oxygen and nitrogen (and any CO groups your body exhales).

The principles of the flight of a boomerang relies mainly on it's interaction with the gasses it moves through. (See : Aerodynamics).
The only effect gravity has on the boomerang is it limits it's vertical ascension somewhat, and during the last leg of it's flight, it's descent becomes noticeable. On the space station it would only be the lack of a downward force that is any different.

Without gravity, the boomerang (The astronaut used a 3 winged boomerang), would fly from the astronaut, and follow an elliptical flight path. The orientation of it's flight would depend on its physical orientation once thrown, and would indeed resemble a surprisingly similar flight path to one thrown from the earths surface. (Surprising if you didn't think about the forces at play before you threw it.)



posted on Apr, 3 2008 @ 01:16 PM
link   
ah there you go, that actually is interesting because i suspected that gravity helped bring it back - sort of like throwing a frisbee at a high angle. but to depth om: i had considered that the center of gravity may be outside the bounds of the object while spinning, but i still was thinking that even though it may fly in a circular path, it would still ultimately fly in some tangental fashion - i guess the easiest way i can illustrate this is to have you imagine constantly drawing a circle on a piece of paper while moving your hand in a straight line in some direction.

[edit on 3-4-2008 by an0maly33]



posted on Apr, 3 2008 @ 01:28 PM
link   

Originally posted by johnsky
Ah, I see the miscommunication here...

He threw it INSIDE the international space station, he did not throw it in a vacuum.

Obviously, the international space station contains air, a mixture of oxygen and nitrogen (and any CO groups your body exhales).

The principles of the flight of a boomerang relies mainly on it's interaction with the gasses it moves through. (See : Aerodynamics).
The only effect gravity has on the boomerang is it limits it's vertical ascension somewhat, and during the last leg of it's flight, it's descent becomes noticeable. On the space station it would only be the lack of a downward force that is any different.

Without gravity, the boomerang (The astronaut used a 3 winged boomerang), would fly from the astronaut, and follow an elliptical flight path. The orientation of it's flight would depend on its physical orientation once thrown, and would indeed resemble a surprisingly similar flight path to one thrown from the earths surface. (Surprising if you didn't think about the forces at play before you threw it.)



hello

cheers very much for that, was gearing up for a MAJOR space conspiracy truemanesque sort of.

many thanks

david



posted on Apr, 4 2008 @ 01:47 PM
link   
Not a problem guys.

I suspect the media outlet that posted the news story intentionally misled the readers to make the story seem a little juicier. Unfortunately, by leaving out the whole "Inside the station" part, and saying it was in "Space", the story becomes incredibly misleading.

But no. If you did in fact throw a boomerang in an actual vacuum instead of inside the space station, it wouldn't act anything like a boomerang... it would essentially be just another piece of garbage spinning away from you, never to return.

Boomerangs require a gas to propel off of. It's wing based shape is what permits it to push off the air and return to you, using it's angular velocity to propel off the air in a similar manor to the way a helicopter blade does, only, it's purposely imbalanced so it's flight path becomes elliptical.



posted on Apr, 5 2008 @ 01:53 AM
link   
Thats exactly right johnsky,its the air, thats the thing.What I don't understand is this vaccum of space? Who says theres a vaccum in space, its just space isn't it?



posted on Apr, 5 2008 @ 03:04 AM
link   
Thanks for explaining that johnsky. I was sitting here wondering how the hell that is possible - throw a boomerang in space and it comes back , but then i read your post, and it makes sense. I knew that there would be a reasonable explanation for this.



new topics

top topics



 
1

log in

join