It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Kobe University: An Unknown Planet in the Outskirts of the Solar System

page: 1
1

log in

join
share:

posted on Mar, 31 2008 @ 11:10 PM
link   

Kobe University: An Unknown Planet in the Outskirts of the Solar System


www.kobe-u.ac.jp

Dr. Patryk Sofia Lykawka and Prof. MUKAI Tadashi of Kobe University have conducted a theoretical work on the origin and dynamical evolution of Trans-Neptunian objects (TNOs). The results strongly suggest the presence of a yet unknown massive planet in the Solar System. With the upcoming future sky surveys, we can expect the planet to be found within 5-10 years.
(visit the link for the full news article)


Related News Links:
www.org.kobe-u.ac.jp




posted on Mar, 31 2008 @ 11:10 PM
link   
To be seen in 5 to 10 years. This means that whatever is suppose to happen before, at or after 2012 is going to come from someplace else; internally or externally. Enternally, our Governemtn doesn't need anymore help screwing us up but externally, it has to have something to do with our sun..is my bet.

www.kobe-u.ac.jp
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Mar, 31 2008 @ 11:37 PM
link   
"Te-hee-hehe"



posted on Mar, 31 2008 @ 11:48 PM
link   
Well, that will make 9 planets again ?

I'm going to stamp my feet now

If Pluto can't be a planet this one shouldn't be a planet because we're not sure its there
so.. until Pluto is a planet again I think all future wanna be planets should wait in line behind Pluto.

Hasn't there always been something beyond Pluto seems like every year or two we get more data that turns out to be nothing



posted on Apr, 1 2008 @ 12:20 AM
link   
So let me get this straight..

We can see explosions in space that happened billions of years ago millions of light years away and we can map out entire galaxies thousands of light years away from us....but we can't see a "massive" planet in our own Solar System for another 5-10 years?



posted on Apr, 1 2008 @ 12:51 AM
link   
reply to post by NovusOrdoMundi
 


It's not as crazy as it sounds.

We can look at galaxies billions of light years away because they are incredibly bright objects.

A planet even the size of Earth would reflect very little light from the sun at the huge distances this thing would be at, it would be very nearly invisible unless you looked in precisely the right place at the right time, and for long enough to note that it was a moving object within our solar system.



[edit on 4/1/08 by xmotex]



posted on Apr, 1 2008 @ 12:58 AM
link   
This thread made me remember this one...

Binary Revolution on Plane of Earth Orbit



posted on Apr, 1 2008 @ 01:39 AM
link   
reply to post by NovusOrdoMundi
 


We can see super novas because they are extremely bright and the light is traveling towards us.



posted on Apr, 1 2008 @ 03:41 AM
link   
i am highly skeptical

and note todays date , my mates morning paper has an article about flying penguins


however - i would love to see the article in question - and examine the evidence they present

the main library 15 miles from me carries the journal in question - or at least it did - do i should have a chance to read it in a couple of weeks

like others my first thought is why has an object so large not been detected by ANY means previously

we have been very thoroughly surveying the univers for over 100 years

specific questions include :

would it not have occulted a visible star

why have IR surveys not detected it

why have ` blink ` comparisons of archive images and survey data not shown it up

my specific " rebuttal " to the claim that its too small and too far away - and too dim is :

we found eris which is < 1 fith the claimed size of PX and > 1 quater the orbital distance claimed

and how have they calculated the size estimate ?????????

very strange - the 2 authours are both listed in google searches - and have published before

i am considering EMAILing them to see if they have time to answer the questions i pose

but i had better read the article first - in case they have been addressed in print



posted on Apr, 1 2008 @ 04:26 AM
link   
I like the Japanese and what they're doing on their own & in collaboration with us. They seem much more hungry than many other nations, so it doesn't/wouldn't surprise me if they make some new discovery's.


Originally posted by EvilBat
Well, that will make 9 planets again ?

If Pluto can't be a planet this one shouldn't be a planet because we're not sure its there
so.. until Pluto is a planet again I think all future wanna be planets should wait in line behind Pluto.



Well, Pluto wasn't completely demoted as they now call it a "Dwarf Planet". It matters not much to me what they call them, because Pluto's still there - just the same. I think the big problem is they realized there's many more objects out there the size of Pluto, so rather than calling them planets they created new definitions. A natural progression I guess - the more stuff we have the more we have to separate and organize them. Then again maybe it was just to kill the planet X conspiracy.

I went to the Cape to view the launch of "New Horizons" and I must admit I was a bit surprised & disappointed with Pluto's demotion a few months later, as it almost makes the "New Horizons" mission seem less important somehow.

Makes you wonder if someone decided to Kick the "New Horizons" creators in the teeth for going there, or maybe they just held on the reclassification until the mission was on its way to keep the money flowing.


[edit on 1-4-2008 by verylowfrequency]



posted on Apr, 1 2008 @ 07:51 AM
link   
reply to post by xmotex
 


Correct me if I am wrong but the way we determine where planets are in other solar systems and galaxies is to find the main star (their "sun"), and then look for a sort of wobbling to determine that there are objects and gravitational forces at work. We then use this to determine if or when we will be able to actually see the object, or the planet.

In basic terms, is that correct?

If so, can't the same technique be applied here?

All I'm saying is our Solar System is interesting too. I don't see why we spend so much time looking beyond when we haven't even finished discovering our own neighborhood.



posted on Apr, 1 2008 @ 08:55 AM
link   
Do the Japanese make jokes on April 1st too? Because this sure looks like a prank.
We'll see in the near future if it does turn out to be one or not.



posted on Apr, 1 2008 @ 09:27 AM
link   
April Fool's day notwithstanding; Gravitational observations have always indicated that our outer planets are being affected by an as of yet undetected object. It was this very study that is said to have led us to 'discover' the outermost planets themselves.

(Of course, much to the chagrin of modern day astronomers these were not technically discoveries as archaeological evidence demonstrated some cultures had a prior knowledge of these outer bodies - how? don't ask me? I wasn't there.)

Editorializing of the scientific reports has commonly used phrases like - astonishing, massive, etc. But you have to take some of it with a grain of salt because after all, they are trying to 'sell' news and if it was mundanely presented who would care? Japanese Universities are no different than most. they have to 'celebrate' their discoveries if they want more grant money (you can tell they need grants by all the starving scientists out there.)

By the way they (NASA) did detect an IR body approaching our solar system back in the 80's on what could possibly be an oblique elliptical, but nobody paid attention to it because of the importance of other things in the news at the time. Probably something to do with Rock Hudson having AIDS or Amelda Marcos' shoe collection.

I'm not one to cry out Planet X or Nibiru or Marduk or Wormwood or whatever. That's just window dressing. But I am willing to bet - there is something out there, whether it's part of our solar system we will most certainly learn - either for good or ill.



posted on Apr, 1 2008 @ 09:29 AM
link   
My thought is that they are using the wobbles in other planets motions (mostly the Neptune orbit anomalies) to deduce that there is something more than the distant, Pluto sized planetoid named 'Sedna' out there.

Out there is likely the Oort cloud where billions of loosely bound masses of ice-dirt are floating around.

If one looks at this link; www.chinadaily.com.cn...

you can see just how actual orbiting bodies are found/discovered.
it's by looking for points of light moving over a period of time,
then the scientists can deduce its orbit and estimate its location...


when Sedna was discovered back in 2004, the astronmers & physcists & such told the public there is probably another larger 'planetoid' out in deep space where Sedna was discovered....because a small icy planetoid slightly smaller than Pluto would not account for the tugs on the Neptune orbit.




top topics



 
1

log in

join