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US Military Airborne Laser Can Destroy Tanks 10 Miles Away

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posted on Mar, 30 2008 @ 06:28 AM
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US Military Airborne Laser Can Destroy Tanks 10 Miles Away


www.telegraph.co.uk

The ten-centimetre-wide beam will heat targets almost instantly to thousands of degrees and will slice through metal even at maximum range. It is intended both for battlefield use and for missile defense.

(visit the link for the full news article)


Related News Links:
www.defense-update.com




posted on Mar, 30 2008 @ 06:28 AM
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Well if this beam is being openly acknowledged and news stories written about it...

...we know the rule: military releases info about NEW tech. The tech has been around for years as classified.

Now that we know this type of weapon exists and I would bet $ that this tech was available on and before 9/11/2001.

This opens a whole new realm of possible theories about 9/11.


www.telegraph.co.uk
(visit the link for the full news article)


XL5

posted on Mar, 30 2008 @ 06:53 AM
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Any laser or even microwave beam that can do that will blind every one thats looking at the target, microwaves can blind at that power. The metal target will also heat up so much that it will turn into white hot plasma and will be visable for miles, it will look like a 10 cm shaft of white light with a tapered end (like a light saber). If the target is concrete, it will explode at the target site and some plasma will be seen along with white hot bits flying off. Black carbon filled smoke will light up white hot with ANY laser beam or microwave beam of that power. We didn't see that on 9/11 nor was anyone blinded by any beams.

Still I do agree that they have much more powerful stuff now but it will still blind people and make plasma.



posted on Mar, 30 2008 @ 10:29 AM
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Makes me think of playing Command and Conquer again, heh.

It's ten centimeters wide, and its used from up to ten miles away... while that may be great for hitting large objects such as a tank, the microwaves using the metal in the tank as part of the reaction... it will be utterly useless for modern warfare.

Modern warfare is typically a guerrilla force against a standing army. The guerrilla force won't be using tanks, or anything large enough for a targeting system to direct such a beam on target.


So, if it we were back in the days of the cold war, great. But we're not... the world is learning how to fight without taking its enemy on . to . with heavy armor.


Yes, when destroying an armored vehicle, I would imagine it would cause quite the flare effect. I should hope no innocent bystanders are nearby when it's fired.
Then again, the civilian casualty rate in Americas current war is hovering around 90%... yep, approximately 90% of the people dying in the war are civilians... so I have a hard time believing they would avoid using this new toy with any restraint either.


Now, suppose you are entering a massive war with an equal rival in which you need this weapon in order to have the upper hand...
... do you really think it would take long for that enemy to get their hands on it?



posted on Mar, 30 2008 @ 10:32 AM
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reply to post by XL5
 


I see that this is much better weapon to use, if somehow its really needed, than use that awful depleted uranium... Almost everything is better than that.



posted on Mar, 30 2008 @ 10:37 AM
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Yet again i'm reminded of the fact that the cold war was never truly ended, and technologies like these being developed purely for military usage only serves to prove my point.

Of course, what application other than a military one this technology could ever possibly serve as defies the imagination.



posted on Mar, 30 2008 @ 10:54 AM
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Originally posted by Throbber
Yet again i'm reminded of the fact that the cold war was never truly ended, and technologies like these being developed purely for military usage only serves to prove my point.

Of course, what application other than a military one this technology could ever possibly serve as defies the imagination.


Well, without even seriously putting any brain power toward your question I can provide you an answer or two to your question.

Deflecting and or destroying incoming space debris, asteroids etc.. is a peace time use.

If they can fly this thing then they can certainly build much more powerful versions on the ground. It could be used to propel space craft. If aimed at the moon they could discover if water exists at certain locations etc...

It is certainly a powerful technology and can be used for many more things than just destroying missle's. It could render other nations Air Forces useless.



[edit on 30-3-2008 by Xeven]



posted on Mar, 30 2008 @ 10:56 AM
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Ironic, considering most of the things you describe would be used in the interests of the state.

Very similar to a military purpose, in otherwords.

[edit on 30-3-2008 by Throbber]



posted on Mar, 30 2008 @ 10:59 AM
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Originally posted by XL5
it will look like a 10 cm shaft of white light with a tapered end (like a light saber).


Why would it look like a tapered white shaft?

Depending on the wavelength of light used it could be any colour or even invisible to the naked eye... And the light would travel in a straight line, so the diameter of the beam would be equal at both ends.



posted on Mar, 30 2008 @ 11:15 AM
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This is sort of old news to me, but likely surprising to some. We should be seeing a replacement of all of our SAM sites as well as add ons mounted above naval observation decks, and several other uses.

I really think this is some good weaponry and should be funded to the fullest extent as well as shrinking the pulse packs down for humvees and drones.



posted on Mar, 30 2008 @ 11:17 AM
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Originally posted by Throbber
Ironic, considering most of the things you describe would be used in the interests of the state.

Very similar to a military purpose, in otherwords.

[edit on 30-3-2008 by Throbber]


Well, I do not consider "used in the interest of the state" as necessarily "very similar to a military purpose" so I cannot really rationalize a response to your comment.

It was obviously build for military purpose though, if that is your point.
They most likely learned lots of things during its development that will likely one day find uses in the civilian sector.


XL5

posted on Mar, 30 2008 @ 03:38 PM
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Now_Then, the plasma coming from the metal/target will taper off at some point and will always be white no matter the colour of the beam. Even invisable laser beams will make white plasma.

I have a small industrial Nd:yag laser that can put very tiny holes in razor blades. It makes a loud snap sound when it hits and with iron targets it makes a yellow-white plasma jet form depending on beam power. On carbon targets (like carbon paper) it makes white plasma and a "toroid" of orange flame around the plasma.

Plasma always forms when you get the target to vaporize into the 4th state of matter, all thats needed is heat.




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