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Quantum Channel Between Earth And Space?

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posted on Mar, 29 2008 @ 01:31 PM
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Quantum Channel Between Earth And Space?


www.sciencedaily.com

ScienceDaily (Mar. 29, 2008) — For the first time, physicists have been able to identify individual returning photons after firing and reflecting them off of a space satellite in orbit almost 1,500 kilometres above the earth. The experiment has proven the possibility of constructing a quantum channel between Space and Earth.
(visit the link for the full news article)


All link issues fixed.


[edit on 29-3-2008 by projectvxn]

[edit on 29-3-2008 by projectvxn]

[edit on 29-3-2008 by projectvxn]




posted on Mar, 29 2008 @ 01:31 PM
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This is pretty much sub-space communications systems. (A quantum tunnel). And this is released to the public. Makes me wonder what our real tech looks like.

www.sciencedaily.com
(visit the link for the full news article)

[edit on 29-3-2008 by projectvxn]



posted on Mar, 29 2008 @ 01:42 PM
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Your link comes up as"403 Forbidden".

You might want to look into that.



posted on Mar, 29 2008 @ 01:47 PM
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To fix the link remove everything after the first '.htm' in the URL. I was able to view the source.



posted on Mar, 29 2008 @ 01:54 PM
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Until now, quantum-encrypted communication has only been proven possible at distances up to about 150 kilometres, either down optical fibres or via telescopes. When sent down optical fibres, photons are dissipated due to scattering and adsorption and, when using telescopes, photons are subject to interfering atmospheric conditions.


I am unclear as to the meaning of to atmospheric conditions. Why would it effect photons and telescopes, but not photons without a telescope. Are they not passing through the same atmosphere? Or is this just a hurdle to be overcome either way?

Wonder if some actual good for humanity can be done with this tech or just more military security and secrets from mankind.



posted on Mar, 29 2008 @ 02:15 PM
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Originally posted by roadgravel

Until now, quantum-encrypted communication has only been proven possible at distances up to about 150 kilometres, either down optical fibres or via telescopes. When sent down optical fibres, photons are dissipated due to scattering and adsorption and, when using telescopes, photons are subject to interfering atmospheric conditions.


I am unclear as to the meaning of to atmospheric conditions. Why would it effect photons and telescopes, but not photons without a telescope. Are they not passing through the same atmosphere? Or is this just a hurdle to be overcome either way?

Wonder if some actual good for humanity can be done with this tech or just more military security and secrets from mankind.


Well this would be ultra fast and secure communications ability. Chances are the military would use it first.



posted on Mar, 29 2008 @ 02:23 PM
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Originally posted by projectvxn

This is pretty much sub-space communications systems. (A quantum tunnel). And this is released to the public. Makes me wonder what our real tech looks like.

www.sciencedaily.com
(visit the link for the full news article)

[edit on 29-3-2008 by projectvxn]


No, it isn't. It is a way to use quantum encryption globally, as opposed to having it's uses restricted by the transmission medium.

It has fudge all to do with subspace communications.



posted on Mar, 29 2008 @ 03:47 PM
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Well you're not using standard encrypted radio channels. It's not subspace, but this isn't normal either. Don't we need quantum computers for this sort of encryption/decryption methods? Have I missed something because last I heard we don't have all the pieces put together for a quantum computer.



posted on Mar, 29 2008 @ 03:56 PM
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reply to post by projectvxn
 


Here's a Wiki article on quantum encryption:

Wiki



Quantum cryptography, or quantum key distribution (QKD), uses quantum mechanics to guarantee secure communication. It enables two parties to produce a shared random bit string known only to them, which can be used as a key to encrypt and decrypt messages.

An important and unique property of quantum cryptography is the ability of the two communicating users to detect the presence of any third party trying to gain knowledge of the key. This results from a fundamental part of quantum mechanics: the process of measuring a quantum system in general disturbs the system. A third party trying to eavesdrop on the key must in some way measure it, thus introducing detectable anomalies. By using quantum superpositions or quantum entanglement and transmitting information in quantum states, a communication system can be implemented which detects eavesdropping. If the level of eavesdropping is below a certain threshold a key can be produced which is guaranteed as secure (i.e. the eavesdropper has no information about), otherwise no secure key is possible and communication is aborted.

The security of quantum cryptography relies on the foundations of quantum mechanics, in contrast to traditional public key cryptography which relies on the computational difficulty of certain mathematical functions, and cannot provide any indication of eavesdropping or guarantee of key security.

Quantum cryptography is only used to produce and distribute a key, not to transmit any message data. This key can then be used with any chosen encryption algorithm to encrypt (and decrypt) a message, which can then be transmitted over a standard communication channel. The algorithm most commonly associated with QKD is the one-time pad, as it is provably secure when used with a secret, random key[1].


The information itself is sent as it would normally have been sent, however, the key to unlock the encryption is sent as per the above. It basically prevents any form of hacking as attempting to intercept the key will destroy it, so only the two parties at either end can ever have the key to unlock data.

[edit on 29/3/08 by stumason]



posted on Mar, 29 2008 @ 04:57 PM
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Thanks. I must admit although standard encryption practices and I get along quite well, this is a bit out of my league. Thanks you for the heads up.



posted on Mar, 29 2008 @ 05:06 PM
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No probs....

If you want subspace/FTL communications, look up quantum entanglement. That has promise. It basically has two particles "entangled" together, at a quantum level, where changes to one particle are instantly seen on the other, theoretically enabling information to be transferred between the two particles.

It remains to be seen if it will truly be able to deliver FTL/subspace comms, but like I said, it has promise.



posted on Mar, 29 2008 @ 05:34 PM
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This article seems to indicate the whole channel is quantum and therefore the security is the channel. In other words it seems that it is not encryption using a key in our current terms, the whole message is subject to security because accessing it would destroy the data which one would assume could be detected.

Just my guess at interpretation ...



posted on Mar, 29 2008 @ 06:14 PM
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.. Think out of the box folks ..

4,429,280 : 31 Jan 84, Appatus and Method for Demodulation of Modulated Curl-Free Magnetic Vector Potential.

4,429,288 : 31 Jan 1984, Apparatus and Method for modulation of a Curl-Free Magnetic Vector Potential Field.

4,432,098 : 14 Feb 1984, Apparatus and Method for transfer of Information by means of a Curl-Free Magnetic Vector Potential Field.

4,447,779 : 8 May 1984, Apparatus and Method for Determination of a Receiving device utilizing a Curl-Free Magnetic Vector Potential Field.

4,605,897, 12 Aug 1986, Apparatus and method for distance determination between receiving device and transmitting device utilizing a Curl-Free Magnetic Vector Potential Field.

4,491,795, 1 Jan 1985, Josephson Junction Interferometer Device for detection of Curl-Free Magnetic Vector Potential field.


In contrast to the common Hertzian transverse vector waves, scalar waves travel, or rather materialize at the receiving end, at superluminal velocities. Scalar waves also quite effectively penetrate trough objects, such as a Faraday Shield, which would stop an ordinary electromagnetic (Hertzian type) wave.

From a few of JNL labs pages .. put the peices together for yourselves.. the tech is there just not in the form your thinking of.

Superluminal means faster than light in case anyone didnt know as well .. this tech dates back to TESLA With RESONATE POWER/ENERGY TRANSFER
Joe

PS I hope you folks take to time to understand what im saying



posted on Mar, 29 2008 @ 07:30 PM
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reply to post by roadgravel
 


No, only the key is quantum.

The actual data is sent normally, but encrypted. In fact, the data need not be sent by the same medium, but thats a technicality.

The whole premise behind quantum cryptography is that if the key is intercepted, it changes it's quantum state and as such, they key information is destroyed as it relies on the quantum state received matching what was sent. Any interference by a third party alters this state, thus rendering the key useless, so depriving any eavesdroppers the ability to intercept the key, thus eliminating that particular security risk.

I did provide a link explaining quantum cryptography........



posted on Mar, 29 2008 @ 07:33 PM
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reply to post by Localjoe3
 


Thats nice...

Shame it has nothing to do with this particular technology.

This isn't Subspace/FTL communication, but rather a means to transmit an encryption key securely without fear of it being intercepted.



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