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Heart Device Hacked to Prove Point

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posted on Mar, 28 2008 @ 09:51 AM
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Heart Device Hacked to Prove Point


dsc.discovery.com

March 27, 2008 -- Scientists from three universities recently hacked into an implantable biomedical device through a wireless connection, stole information about a hypothetical patient's health and personal history and changed the cardiac defibrillator's settings.

Had the patient been real, he could have been killed.
(visit the link for the full news article)




posted on Mar, 28 2008 @ 09:51 AM
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This just goes to show that people are putting way too much trust into technology, and companies don't mind rolling out huge projects without doing extensive testing first.

20 years from now, all credit cards, passports, pacemakers, cars, phones, etc. will be hacked, and no one will be safe.

This is another good reason why implanting people with chips is such a horrible idea.

dsc.discovery.com
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Mar, 28 2008 @ 10:11 AM
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Aye, but we need to make the security better rather than abandoning medical concepts wholesale.

I mean if you think about it, its sheer stupidity to allow an inward connection to the device! At most they should have an "electronic valve" which lets telemetry about the patients vital signs out, but nothing to go into the device.

Either that or made the memory system hardwired and unprogrammable like the BIOS on a computer.



posted on Mar, 28 2008 @ 10:12 AM
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The researchers say it was the first time anyone has hacked into a biomedical device.

dsc.discovery.com...

Please visit the link provided for the complete story.


I found the above to be especially telling. Are they sure? Or is it the first time they are aware of? I think the latter.

Great find, and definitely deserves a flag. I hope more people read this.

TheRedneck



posted on Mar, 28 2008 @ 10:45 AM
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Unfortunately, a simple security upgrade will not due. Anyting that is programmed by humans, can be cracked by humans.

Although a "valve" system as you said maybe a very good idea in stopping any changes being made to the device, the information can still be stolen by those that should not have access to such private data.

Im with you Scientist, too much trust in technology.



posted on Mar, 28 2008 @ 10:49 AM
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Three questions:

1) What technology would you need to hack a pacemaker?

2) What would be the effective range?

3) Where's Dick Cheney?



posted on Mar, 28 2008 @ 11:24 AM
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Originally posted by citizen smith
Three questions:

1) What technology would you need to hack a pacemaker?


Seeing as it was done wireless, I imagine you would need a reciever, a program to handle the data recieved and potentially decrypt it. As well as a transmitter to return data to the device.



2) What would be the effective range?

3) Where's Dick Cheney?



Couldnt answer either of those for you, dont have enough information.



posted on Mar, 28 2008 @ 11:32 AM
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That is worrying. I need a pacemaker, but turned it down, because I do not like the idea of being run on batteries. What if something happened and there were no more surgeons to replace my battery?

But now my heart is getting worse and I have no choice, because if I don't get one I will die, so that looks the better route now.

Ama



posted on Mar, 28 2008 @ 11:39 AM
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they are already putting microchips into visa cards for "increased security".



posted on Mar, 28 2008 @ 11:43 AM
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reply to post by amatrine
 


My suggestion, get the pace maker.

Its been in use for years, and its saved countless lives. This article details a new pace maker that has wireless data transmition capabilities.



posted on Mar, 28 2008 @ 11:43 AM
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I always have agreed on the point that as a species human beings rely far too much on technology to deal with our problems - ever since the Wheel was invented we've been slowly but steadily working towards what we see today in modern society.

Cramped in like sardines so we can be taxed, go to work during the week along the veins of our civilisation - roads and trains are both vital to our society because we get massive amounts of tax from the people who use them, work 9-5 for a wage so you can pay more taxes, and then you get home after filling up the gas tank (paying more taxes), and you decide to buy some beer and watch a film, both of which are taxable.

As far as i can see, every single technological advancement has been presented to the wider public in a way that permits a taxable precondition.

So yes, using TAXES as a demonstration, we have become too reliant on technology - if it were not for Roads, Cars, T.V, Beer, Trains, Planes, etc - we would not have the finances in order to create other technologies.

This essentially means that the Technology that we have NOW, CANNOT BE REPLACED, even if that which we replace the technology with is better or more efficient.

The only time in which it is feasible to introduce new technology is when the STATE is in a position of prosperity, which means it is next to impossible considering the way the Establishment tries to keep control over EVERYTHING.

In one short sentence for enjoyment; Our reliance on Technology is restricting us from applying Technological Advancements.



posted on Mar, 28 2008 @ 12:17 PM
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Originally posted by citizen smith
1) What technology would you need to hack a pacemaker?


A simple wireless transceiver and a small data processing device. I'd wager a BASIC Stamp would be overkill. All can be assembled in a basement shop.


2) What would be the effective range?


Depending on the power/sensitivity of the transceiver, I'd say a few feet. But that could include the guy standing next to you in the elevator; remember we're talking about a device that could fit in his pocket and be activated with one touch.


3) Where's Dick Cheney?


What?!? I thought YOU were watching him! Oh, crap...

TheRedneck



posted on Mar, 28 2008 @ 01:18 PM
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Originally posted by citizen smith


3) Where's Dick Cheney?



LMAO!!!

That was the VERY FIRST THING I thought of when I read this. Can the american public hire these hackers?

On a serious note, this is pretty creepy stuff.



posted on Mar, 28 2008 @ 01:47 PM
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Originally posted by citizen smith
Three questions:

1) What technology would you need to hack a pacemaker?

2) What would be the effective range?

3) Where's Dick Cheney?



Man, if anyone deserved an Oscar it is YOU! That is so original and yet so much needed



posted on Mar, 29 2008 @ 05:42 PM
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technically, you could write a virus tat would simply install itself on computers with wifi/rfid, and just constantly transmit fatal errors to all pacemakers within their maximum radius. to control that a bit more, you could simply input a certain person's id# (im guessing the pacemakers have SSID on them somehow) and then just target that person (in this case, perhaps an aforementioned political tyrant).

[edit on 29-3-2008 by scientist]



posted on Mar, 29 2008 @ 06:38 PM
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I suppose if you wanted to kill someone that was using a medical device you could potentially do it more anonymously than using a pistol or poison. Which is what makes this interesting.

Being able to adjust or reprogram devices without opening up the patient means less intrusions and less infections which means a better more normal life for patients, which in my opinion is worth the unlikely risks of hacker hit men.

There's always room for improvements - just like the original cars probably didn't have keys, but even without keys thieves still take them today.

Where there's a will there's always a way, but that doesn't mean we abandon the convenience or good of those products just because they can be used for bad purposes.



posted on Mar, 29 2008 @ 06:58 PM
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Originally posted by scientist
This just goes to show that people are putting way too much trust into technology, and companies don't mind rolling out huge projects without doing extensive testing first.


Sheesh nothing like a little hysteria to get in the way of facts eh?

From you article.


The programmer must be within a few inches of the device to obtain information or to change settings. While the information is transmitted wirelessly though radio waves which easily extend over large distances, a strong magnetic field -- much harder to extend -- must also be present.


Nothing new here. You change setting thats way otherwise the patient in question would have to have operations to change settings every time. So for this to work you would have to let someone hover inches from your chest while you stayed stationary and hack thier way into you device. So you going to let some stranger do this? And if you are out you are already at thier mercy eh?



posted on Mar, 31 2008 @ 07:26 AM
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reply to post by FredT
 


In this day and age of crazy computer hackers, is it not conceivalbe that someone could write software that does all the hard work automatically, within a few seconds?

if so, is it also conceivable that someone wishing to do harm to a specific person, could get close enough to said person for a few seconds to run their script/hack?



posted on Mar, 31 2008 @ 08:15 AM
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Originally posted by citizen smith
Three questions:

1) What technology would you need to hack a pacemaker?

2) What would be the effective range?

3) Where's Dick Cheney?



1) I imagine the hardware is almost off the shelf, that is to say the surgeons implanting and updating the thing have to purchase the thing somewhere - the interesting point in the article is..


The programmer must be within a few inches of the device to obtain information or to change settings. While the information is transmitted wirelessly though radio waves which easily extend over large distances, a strong magnetic field -- much harder to extend -- must also be present.


Which to me indicates that there is some sort of magnetic 'key' that has to be activated in order to access the wireless connection.

2) Very close as regards the 'magnetic key' idea - possibly further for the wireless part.

3) May I suggest a tried and tested method - high powered rifle works fine.. Watch out, he's usually packing a shotgun himself, 'duck!' .. 'where?' BAM - 'sorry mate!'



posted on Mar, 31 2008 @ 09:57 AM
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reply to post by 44soulslayer
 


A few problems with your postulations.


One, medical history changes over time. You can become diabetic. Get a blood clot and go on anti-coagulants, etc. So, you must be able to update the info, or end up with many implants.

Second, a motherboard BIOS are updatable. Apparently you have never done so, but, yes, you can check usually the manufacturer site (such as HP.com if you have an HP, go to troubleshooting or whatever, enter your model # and check for the update). You download the update and install it, can't remember if from a disc or before a restart, but I have done it before.


So, even something like BIOS can get updated firmware, and it would be illogical to not have access to update it anyway as a patient's conditions change.


I would prefer to NOT have such a device in me, for any reason. Eliminates the problems. I have no health conditions, and even if I did, that is what medical bracelets/necklaces/cards are for.



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