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Global Rioting Potential? The looming meltdown.

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posted on Mar, 29 2008 @ 10:52 AM
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I do wonder how long a full blown melt down riot would last... 30, 60, 90 days or more? I mean we are talking a huge melt down in humanity. There would be mass executions or a thinning of the herd so to speak. At the very least a big round up and off to the "FEAM Camps" kind of event for those that didn't stock pile.

For those of us who prepared for this event how long does anyone think we would need to hide before we could re-assimilate back into society?

I only have a little over 60 days worth of food for my family at the moment. I am heading out this afternoon with my biweekly $100.00 the wife "gives me" out of "my pay check" for the cause.


More ammo is on tap this week. There is a gun and knife show here in my state and I should be able to pick up a bunch more with my $100.00. I bought 12 cans of propane last week to add to my lot with that and some more can goods.

I am really banking on hunting more than defence with my ammo. At least that is what I am hoping for. I would hate to have to waste a bullet on a human. No matter which way you cook it I don't think eating humans is all that good for you...




posted on Mar, 29 2008 @ 11:16 AM
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reply to post by Perplexed
 



I definately agree. To be honest that is how I would rather live my daily life. Self reliant.I am just stuck in this trap society set, I can't save enough to get out of this damn NY.Simplicity is the answer.Then your daily struggles of trying to eat and provide would be meaningful. Not working some useless job you hate to try to barely provide for family.

To be honest (imho) technology has ruined this world and is part of the population problem.In days of old,only the strong would survive and that's how it should be.Instead we have all these machines to keep people alive that by natures standard wouldn't be.Babies born that will need operations the rest of their lives to live a horrible existence.Really old people who already lived their lives but family doesn't wannna let go. We also have a system designed to be taken advantage of and now you have some peice of trash using drugs, having sex with multiple guys having tons of kids that we have to contribute to take care of, who in turn were raised with no values and turn out to be a P.O.S. and totally useless in society.

Society will implode becaus we can't sustain this pace for long.Everyday brings new problems.My main goal is to hopefully buy as much land and build my own house and be self reliant.Still live relatively modern but also situated to be prepare to live primative and still survive comfortably. This system is designed so that we can't do anything with out their help.We are a very dependent and useless world.





[edit on 29-3-2008 by 19DCW71]



posted on Mar, 29 2008 @ 11:39 AM
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Incredible post loam, exemplary work! They ought to link new members (and some old members) to this thread to show them how it should be done!

The proposition of a food shortage is definitely on the cards. There is going to be a radical shift in the water supplies in different areas of the world. While Holland and Bangladesh will have to deal with flooding, other areas that depend on rivers will dry up.

In particular I think of the arid desert farming in Utah, Nevada, NM etc.

Of course, there is also an element of mismanagement of resources. We waste a lot of food (wheat) in the UK, which we are forced to buy from Turkey for reasons that only the EU knows. Most of this would be better suited in third world countries.

In the worlds poorest regions such as Darfur and Zimbabwe, there is a definite element of war and government tyranny which leads to such shortages of food.

For a greater understanding of the effect of farming on the economy of a country, see my thread:
www.abovetopsecret.com...

Unless we gets the basics of the agrarian economy right and stable, we are doomed to instability as a planet.



posted on Mar, 29 2008 @ 01:22 PM
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Threat to millions as food aid scheme runs out of money

...

"This is the new face of hunger," she said. "People are simply being priced out of food markets. It's the first time we have been hit by a dramatic market surprise. We have never before had a situation where aggressive rises in food prices keep pricing our operations out of our reach."

...

"It's a situation that is changing nearly every day. We used to adjust our basic food prices every year or two but now it's weekly or even daily because the changes are so quick and, unfortunately, all seem to go in the same direction"

...

Rice last week jumped to a three-decade high, experiencing the same sort of spike that has already affected wheat, corn and soybeans. The price of these staple foods has been driven skywards by increased demand for food from the newly prospering parts of south and east Asia, damage to crops by natural disasters, and by the growing demand for biofuels. "It's a global phenomenon which is hitting the most vulnerable populations hard," Ms Sheeran said.

More...






North Korea food crisis looms as aid flow dries up

North Korea, which even with a good harvest still falls about 1 million tonnes, or around 20 percent, short of the food needed to feed its own people, relies heavily on aid from China, South Korea and UN aid agencies to make up the gap.

"If the South and the global community fail to send food aid to the North, we might see a food crisis even worse than the one in the 90s," said Kwon Tae-jin, an expert on the North's agriculture sector at the South's Korea Rural Economic Institute.

A famine in the mid-to-late 1990s killed more than 1 million North Koreans in a country of about 23 million.

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Rice now too costly to give away

BANGKOK - Soaring global rice prices are hitting the stomachs of Asia's poorest citizens. The people of East Timor, where nearly 40% live on less than 0.55 US cents a day, have just been told they may not receive their annual quota of food aid.

"We have been forced to provide less food to East Timor; provide less rice than we intended to," Paul Risely, Asia spokesperson for the United Nations food agency, told Inter Press Service (IPS). "We have requested the people of East Timor to look for local substitutes."

Part of the problem stems from poor planning with the Dili government urging the World Food Program (WFP) to step in only after finding that it could not afford to purchase sufficient quantities of the grain from Vietnam, due to high prices.

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Bangladesh Patronizing Terror?

According to latest information from Bangladesh, rice, which is the main food for Bangladeshis, is becoming expensive almost every day. Present price of rice is much beyond buying capacity of at least sixty-eight per cent of the population. But, the military backed government is trying its best in suppressing information on such acute food crisis, silent famine and even death of people due to lack of food.

More...



And here is a story that defines "bad timing":





One million face famine after rats feast on crops

The people of Mizoram, a tiny, remote state of north-east India squeezed between Burma and Bangladesh, have known for the past 48 years that they would face famine in 2008. Confirmation came last November when the local species of bamboo that dominates the state's landscape began to burst into flower - a peculiar ecological phenomenon that happens about twice a century.

A plague of rats rapidly followed, feasting on the bamboo's protein-rich avocado-like fruit, before swarming to consume the farmers' rice paddies, grain harvests and food stockpiles. Now up to a million people are facing hunger, according to aid agencies.

Mrinal Gohain, of charity Action Aid, said: 'There were rats all over the fields. Farmers would go to harvest their crops and find that the entire field had been eaten overnight.'

More...



And here is a very interesting article published just hours ago:




Global Food Crisis

The United States (US) is currently using about 9% of its wheat, 25% of its corn and about 15% of its grain in general to produce biofuel. The United Kingdom (UK) has committed to large increases in the use of biofuels over coming decades, has recently announced subsidies for biofuel and supports the European Commission (EU) target requiring 10 per cent of petrol station fuel to be plant-derived biofuel within 12 years. However the huge and intrinsically genocidal US diversion of 15% of its grain crop to biofuel production has had a huge impact already on soaring global food prices – the world is already facing a global food crisis with alarm being expressed by UN, FAO and other scientific experts.

Thus the UK Chief Scientific Adviser, Professor John Beddington CMG, FRS (Professor of Applied Population Biology at Imperial College, London.) has described the devastating potential of food shortages as an "elephant in the room" problem commensurate with that from climate change and warns that biofuel diversion (e.g. for canola oil- or palm oil-derived biodiesel and grain- or sugar-derived ethanol) is threatening world food production and the lives of “billions” (see: here): "It's very hard to imagine how we can see the world growing enough crops to produce renewable energy and at the same time meet the enormous demand for food. The supply of food really isn't keeping up."

...

The world may be seeing the commencement of a re-run - on a possibly 100-fold greater scale - of the man-made World War 2 Bengali Holocaust in which 6-7 million people perished in Bengal and in the adjoining provinces of Assam, Bihar and Orissa under the merciless British “scorched earth policy” when the price of rice doubled and finally doubled again (see: here ). Ten years ago I published a book entitled “Jane Austen and the Black Hole of British History” in which I described horrendous man-made, market-forces famines in British-ruled India from the 1769-1770 Great Bengal Famine (10 million deaths or one third of the Bengali population) to the World War 2 Bengal Famine (6-7 million deaths in the Bengal region).

More...



The dominoes all seem lined up. Now the question remains how many of them will fall?


[edit on 29-3-2008 by loam]



posted on Mar, 29 2008 @ 02:39 PM
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Originally posted by Riposte
My first thought was to get into the rice farming business, not a global rioting meltdown. Be thankful we don't live in a planned economy. Supply and demand, people.


I'm glad you mentioned this. This is how crisis is avoided. If rice prices are high then it is a great time to grow rice. Likewise for any other food. Out of all the posts so far in this thread you are the only one who saw this. That is kinda sad.



posted on Mar, 29 2008 @ 03:09 PM
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reply to post by loam
 


Good Job "loam".

There is so much garbage and "Clerk's Rhetoric" flowing that I pretty much stopped making an effort at posting pertinent news or commenting but, your thread warrants a response.

Those who know and can do anything about it, are preparing themselves.

Good Luck



posted on Mar, 29 2008 @ 03:50 PM
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Originally posted by spaznational

Originally posted by Riposte
My first thought was to get into the rice farming business, not a global rioting meltdown. Be thankful we don't live in a planned economy. Supply and demand, people.


I'm glad you mentioned this. This is how crisis is avoided. If rice prices are high then it is a great time to grow rice. Likewise for any other food. Out of all the posts so far in this thread you are the only one who saw this. That is kinda sad.


Saying a thing is not the same a making the thing happen.




EXPERTS SOUND ALARM ON FUTURE AVAILABILITY OF RICE

Land endowment determines which countries have enough of the cereal, say the world’s foremost rice experts.

Thailand, India, Vietnam, Myanmar, Cambodia and Bangladesh are all blessed with broad riverine deltas and plains with huge tracts suitable for rice farming, and allot more than half of their arable land to it, said International Rice Research Institute (IRRI) economist David Dawe.

Rice importers by contrast are island or peninsular nations with more varied landscapes favoring maize, palm oil or coconut.

Rice yields in the Philippines are nearly double those of Thailand, the world’s top exporter, yet as in Indonesia “there is just not enough land,” said IRRI President Robert Zeigler, who spoke to Agence France-Presse in a joint interview with Dawe.

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...not to mention the other challenges mentioned in the article.



posted on Mar, 29 2008 @ 08:39 PM
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Excellent job as usual, loam. I’m feeling that the few hours I spent today turning over another part of my back yard for planting were well spent. Potatoes and beans for now, and when the heat of the summer gets here and potatoes are done, I’ll plant corn. It’s not nearly enough to survive on (I’ve got a room full of stored food for that), but it gets me used to the inevitable, and gives me seed for next year. The global famine is coming, I’m sure of it. Let’s just hope it hurts not the oil and the wine.



posted on Mar, 30 2008 @ 12:11 PM
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Originally posted by loam

Originally posted by spaznational

Originally posted by Riposte
My first thought was to get into the rice farming business, not a global rioting meltdown. Be thankful we don't live in a planned economy. Supply and demand, people.


I'm glad you mentioned this. This is how crisis is avoided. If rice prices are high then it is a great time to grow rice. Likewise for any other food. Out of all the posts so far in this thread you are the only one who saw this. That is kinda sad.


Saying a thing is not the same a making the thing happen.




EXPERTS SOUND ALARM ON FUTURE AVAILABILITY OF RICE

Land endowment determines which countries have enough of the cereal, say the world’s foremost rice experts.

Thailand, India, Vietnam, Myanmar, Cambodia and Bangladesh are all blessed with broad riverine deltas and plains with huge tracts suitable for rice farming, and allot more than half of their arable land to it, said International Rice Research Institute (IRRI) economist David Dawe.

Rice importers by contrast are island or peninsular nations with more varied landscapes favoring maize, palm oil or coconut.

Rice yields in the Philippines are nearly double those of Thailand, the world’s top exporter, yet as in Indonesia “there is just not enough land,” said IRRI President Robert Zeigler, who spoke to Agence France-Presse in a joint interview with Dawe.

More...



...not to mention the other challenges mentioned in the article.


I was stricktly speaking about the US.



posted on Mar, 30 2008 @ 06:11 PM
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Originally posted by spaznational
I was stricktly speaking about the US.


Fair enough.

According to the USDA Rice Outlook report released on March 12, 2008:




US Rice plantings of 2.76 million acres were 77,000 acres below a year ago. The area decline was primarily due to strong prices for competing crops and high fuel and fertilizer prices.



Essentially, it's getting too damned expensive to grow.


[edit on 30-3-2008 by loam]



posted on Mar, 30 2008 @ 10:59 PM
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Relative to this article I cited earlier, we now have these posted today:






Food Stamp Use at Record Pace as Jobs Vanish

Driven by a painful mix of layoffs and rising food and fuel prices, the number of Americans receiving food stamps is projected to reach 28 million in the coming year, the highest level since the aid program began in the 1960s.

The number of recipients, who must have near-poverty incomes to qualify for benefits averaging $100 a month per family member, has fluctuated over the years along with economic conditions, eligibility rules, enlistment drives and natural disasters like Hurricane Katrina, which led to a spike in the South.

But recent rises in many states appear to be resulting mainly from the economic slowdown, officials and experts say, as well as inflation in prices of basic goods that leave more families feeling pinched. Citing expected growth in unemployment, the Congressional Budget Office this month projected a continued increase in the monthly number of recipients in the next fiscal year, starting Oct. 1 — to 28 million, up from 27.8 million in 2008, and 26.5 million in 2007.

More...



And...




One in 6 West Virginians is on food stamps

About one in every six West Virginians gets food stamps, the highest level of participation in at least 30 years.

mid rising food and fuel costs, the assistance is becoming worth less and less.

And supplemental food programs for poor families are struggling to keep up with the added demand as donations are on the decline.

More...




[edit on 30-3-2008 by loam]



posted on Mar, 31 2008 @ 06:08 PM
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I suspect we will see articles like the following everyday for some time to come...




Tensions rise as world faces short rations

Food prices are soaring, a wealthier Asia is demanding better food and farmers can't keep up. In short, the world faces a food crisis and in some places it is already boiling over.

Around the globe, people are protesting and governments are responding with often counterproductive controls on prices and exports -- a new politics of scarcity in which ensuring food supplies is becoming a major challenge for the 21st century.

...

In 2007 alone, according to the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization's world food index, dairy prices rose nearly 80 percent and grain 42 percent.

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It's almost too hard to believe, isn't it?



posted on Mar, 31 2008 @ 06:50 PM
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Wow, a lot of links and really good information. I am almost sure, that many countries in the world will have revolutions. The American Government is corrupt. Many countries also have similarities between their government today and the French Government in 1779.



posted on Apr, 2 2008 @ 12:40 AM
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This is really scary.
Specially since Buenos Aires (my city
) is suffering a food shortage right now.
In this case is because of a protest. Cattle handlers and Farmers have "cut" one of the main routes to buenos aires not letting any truck come in. The protest is against a new tax that would hurt the small and medium farmer.
We are having a meat shortage that started a week ago +.
The strange thing is that the media insisted that we were also having milk and vegetable shortage. Which is not exactly true, since i have found plenty milk and vegetables at the many stores arround my house.
Also it strange that the food places still sell meat, but you can't find any otherwise.
We are one of the worlds largest meat producers. And meat is the main food for many argentinians.

What scares me is not this shortage that we are experiencing.
What scares me is that there is suddenly a media bombardment about the food shortage... so much coincidence or so much truth?
Even what scares me more is that i live in a 4million people city. But thats a lie, we are surrounded by the suburbs, which are pretty much like the city and are inhabited by arround 12million heads.
People don't notice, when the are born in the city, but a sever food shortage in buenos aires could (or could not depending on the conditions) famine that would develope in plage. There is no other way to eat than the grocery store.


I also red in the paper today that the US was facing something really close to resession and that for the first time US citizen was selecting what he buy by what is cheaper.
Please don't kill me if thats a lie, i just red it on the paper.

Still, Europe, US, Australia. Having economic problems? inflating prices?
Latin america lives with inflations, and who knows what is happening in the rest of the world.
It's just me or all the world is in an economic crisis, and now we have a food crisis?
Is the NWO, the aliens, nazis on the moon, or whoever wants to run the show waiting in the shadows to offer a "solution" for when finally everything falls?
Or are we just heading to one of the worst worldwide crisis that the world has ever seen?



posted on Apr, 2 2008 @ 01:20 AM
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(Puts on Conspiracy Hat)

Am I the only one who feels like this could be engineered? Most of the articles seem to be pointing the finger at rising costs as the main issue here. The costs are rising because Oil is unbelievably high, meaning more money to run the equipment, more to transport... across the board oil prices are directly linked to the rise in cost. Could the same people that brought about the high oil prices be behind this?

Could this not be a power move to bring about world wide chaos? Create a problem for which the government would be the only solution? Starve the people, cause riots and uncertainty, then step in and save the day.

There were mulitple times that it was mentioned that countries turning to nationalism is hurting the world. Which in my mind means that they are suggesting that globalism is the right way to go. That sounds an aweful lot like the NWO to me.

I don't know. Weather it is a grand scheme designed to usher in the NWO or not, something bad is happening.

[edit on 2-4-2008 by Karlhungis]



posted on Apr, 2 2008 @ 10:09 PM
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I find it funny that we have built homes on some of the best farmland in the world. I grew up in sacramento area and the rice farmers at one time were paid to not grow rice. Not sure if the subsides are still going on but when the land became valuable for homes they covered the land with homes. I always thought that it was a real shame we didn't treasure the land. Don't get me wrong there is still loads of land available to use for farming but at the same time there is plenty of land that is not suitable for farming that would be great for homes.

Someone mentioned that we could not have food problems here, but the last time I checked a vast majority of the fruits and vegetables we eat come from over seas. I know that if they said piss up a rope people would panic. People were panicking when the fires went through S. Cal this year. And that was really not a big deal. I think you could get the sheep running for no real reason pretty easy.



posted on Apr, 3 2008 @ 03:39 AM
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More...




...food shortages and inflation are fueling political unrest: "Since January, thousands of troops have been deployed in Pakistan to guard trucks carrying wheat and flour. Protests have erupted in Indonesia over soybean shortages, and China has put price controls on cooking oil, grain, meat, milk and eggs. Food riots have erupted in recent months in Guinea, Mauritania, Mexico, Morocco, Senegal, Uzbekistan and Yemen."

World Bank President Robert Zoellick rang the alarm bell in a speech yesterday. He noted that since 2005, the prices of staples have risen 80 percent. The real price of rice rose to a 19-year high last month, he said, while the real price of wheat hit a 28-year high.

Zoellick warned that this inflation is having political repercussions: "The World Bank Group estimates that 33 countries around the world face potential political and social unrest because of the acute hike in food and energy prices."

Link.






The situation in Africa, and particularly in sub-Saharan Africa, remains critical. Recent food price riots in some African countries are likely to expand in the coming months.

'The escalation of social unrest we have seen in Cameroon, Burkina Faso, Mauritania and Senegal may become commonplace in other African countries,'...

Link.






In the United Arab Emirates and Bahrain, the combination of rising prices and falling dollar purchasing power has sparked riots and protests by migrant workers, many of whom live in squalor among the skyscrapers and sports car showrooms.

Link.





[edit on 3-4-2008 by loam]



posted on Apr, 10 2008 @ 07:45 AM
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More, again...




Rice Jumps to Record on Philippine Imports, Curbs on Exports

April 8 (Bloomberg) -- Rice climbed to a record for a fourth day as the Philippines, the biggest importer, announced plans to buy 1 million tons and some of the world's largest exporters cut sales to ensure they can feed their own people.

...

``We're in for a tough time,'' Roland Jansen, chief executive officer of Pfaffikon, Switzerland-based Mother Earth Investments AG, said in an interview with Bloomberg Television from Zurich today. Unless prices decline, ``you will have huge problems of daily nutrition for half the planet.''

...

China, Egypt, Vietnam and India, accounting for more than a third of global rice exports, curbed sales this year to protect domestic stockpiles. The World Bank in Washington says 33 nations from Mexico to Yemen may face ``social unrest'' after food and energy costs increased for six consecutive years.

More...



and...




Philippines threatens rice hoarders with life imprisonment

Filipinos face life in prison if they're caught hoarding rice.

"The Department of Justice is preparing economic sabotage or plunder charges that carry a life sentence against traders found to be hoarding rice, the price of which has risen sharply amid a tight global supply," The Inquirer reports. "Although the country has yet to experience a shortage, Justice Secretary Raul Gonzalez Thursday vowed to hale to court hoarders and other unscrupulous rice traders for acts 'inimical to the public interest.'"

...

More...



This situation continues to be very serious.

[edit on 10-4-2008 by loam]



posted on Apr, 10 2008 @ 07:52 AM
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reply to post by Karlhungis
 


It feels that way. I find it hard to believe with all of our technology and resources that so many events of the world today are happening. It seems very contrived.

It's just pretty unbelievable that this is 2008 and we are facing world economic meltdown, food shortages, endless war and environmental catastrophe and NO ONE has any answers or a plan to fix this crap. I really think Mckenna is right about his Novelty theory. Things are moving and changing just way too fast for anyone to be able to keep up much less alter the course. It really is a crazy train.



posted on Apr, 10 2008 @ 08:02 AM
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reply to post by deltaboy
 


spot on deltaboy!




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