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F18 shows how not to do it

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posted on Mar, 27 2008 @ 01:44 PM
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Midland Air Show, Texas USA. F18 departure over rotates whilst in reheat.

www.richard-seaman.com...

A timely reminder as we enter the airshow season of the fine line between looking good, and being a dork.

Photo: Richard Seaman




posted on Mar, 27 2008 @ 03:35 PM
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That's gonna cost
.

Hmm... I wonder what the difference would be between a tailstrike on those nozzles and nozzles equipped for pitch TVC? How much stress could the servos take?



posted on Mar, 28 2008 @ 07:41 AM
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reply to post by Harlequin
 


ouch! He'll be in for one serious ear bending from airfield crews too, that's a lot of burnt tarmac!

I remember being at Warton (BAE) a few years back during the Typhoon testing. The test pilots were constantly being screamed at by management for scorching the runway, never actually tail striking though, too much power for that!


Cheers

Robbie



posted on Mar, 29 2008 @ 08:19 PM
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do you know if he is taking off or landing when he struck? it may be that as this is a show plane the avionics may permit this to happen. most planes have antirotation built into the avionics to limit the angle the plane can reach when close to the ground. I know for a fact that the commercial 747, 777 and concorde have (had) that safeguard as they all have long rear overhangs prone to tail striking. I also know that the sr71 had it built in. i would imagine that the vast majority of normal production aircraft would have this!

(all of this info is widely available on various websites and via discovery channel!)



posted on Mar, 29 2008 @ 08:21 PM
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Taking off. He wouldn't be in afterburner if he was landing. He also wouldn't be at such a steep angle of attack.


[edit on 3/29/2008 by Zaphod58]



posted on Mar, 29 2008 @ 08:35 PM
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duhhh... i should have realised... but hey it is nearly 3am UK!

i still stand by my previous point of having an over rotation safeguard switched off in the avionics for show use - it wouldn't be any good to do a low pass and then not be able to pull up!



posted on Mar, 30 2008 @ 05:36 AM
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Commercial aircraft only. Fighter pilots tend not to enjoy having limits placed on their manoeuverability, whatever the altitude...



posted on Mar, 30 2008 @ 07:57 AM
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reply to post by rat256
 


im sorry but your wrong on commercial aircraft - there has been many MANY video`s let alone pictures of civilian airliners taistriking on take off

www.jetphotos.net...

^^ Btrip7 on take off

www.youtube.com...#

www.youtube.com...#

and was that or wasn`t that a strike - too close to call



posted on Mar, 30 2008 @ 01:38 PM
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reply to post by Harlequin
 


I may not be entirely correct, but i am 100% certain the aircraft i mentioned, the 747, the long 777 and concorde have overrotation protection.

it may be only on more recent planes.



posted on Mar, 30 2008 @ 09:22 PM
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Old pic...Not only is it a B model, it doesn't even have the fences added to the top of the LEX. I'd bet this was a pre-1990 pic.



posted on Mar, 30 2008 @ 09:25 PM
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Try again. It's an F model. It has square intakes. The A-D model had round intakes. The E model was the first to have square intakes.



posted on Mar, 31 2008 @ 01:52 AM
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reply to post by EBJet
 


well the aircraft pictured Malaysia Airlines 9M-MRJ is a Boeing 777-200ER which is 209ft long and definatly does not have anything to stop teh tail crashing down!

upload.wikimedia.org...

and thats a boeing 747-400 fully set up on final`s - and again there is no tailstrike protection device

www.jetphotos.net...

a moment after a tailstrike on take off

sorry but 747`s do not have nything to stop the tailhitting the deck


www.ualberta.ca...

but concord does



posted on Mar, 31 2008 @ 09:13 AM
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Originally posted by rat256
reply to post by Harlequin
 


I may not be entirely correct, but i am 100% certain the aircraft i mentioned, the 747, the long 777 and concorde have overrotation protection.

it may be only on more recent planes.


The 747 is not a fly by wire aircraft, it has no limitations on what the pilots can command the aircraft to do.

The 777-300 does have rotation protection limits, but you can still carry out an overrotation and a tail strike.

Concorde has no limit, thats why it had a tail wheel.



posted on Mar, 31 2008 @ 10:01 AM
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reply to post by EBJet
 


www.richard-seaman.com...

scroll down for 2 photo`s of this aircraft - and 2 more photo`s from different days of 2 of the VFA-106`s F/A18F

in comparison , as mentioned above

www.dpdproductions.com...

thats an F/A18D - notice the airintakes are rounded and smaller and mounted on teh side of the fuselage , whilst the F models are bigger , square and very much below the fuselage!



posted on Apr, 2 2008 @ 09:01 PM
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The 18 isn't the only one doing this at shows it seems. Last year during a display of the Mig-29OVT this one was caught too doing a bit of "grinding". Ouch and again not the most cost effective practise.



Just a quick post to keep things balanced


[edit on 2-4-2008 by Canada_EH]



posted on Apr, 2 2008 @ 09:05 PM
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Originally posted by EBJet
Old pic...Not only is it a B model, it doesn't even have the fences added to the top of the LEX. I'd bet this was a pre-1990 pic.


Other then the fact it comes from a site that says at the top "Highlights of the 2007 Midland CAF/FINA Airshow". Simple mistake though and it pays not to jump the gun too much with some of the things that "we" think we know

[edit on 2-4-2008 by Canada_EH]



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