Did the Mayan Calandar have leap years?

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posted on Mar, 27 2008 @ 03:19 AM
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I was just wondering if the Mayab Calendar had leap years. Cause if not over like 2000 years isnt that alota days and it could throw off the timing by i dont know havent bothered to do the math. But it could drastically change the year of our supposed 2012




posted on Mar, 27 2008 @ 10:58 AM
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No worries. A year is a year and in a "Leap Year" it's no different. I may be wrong but no one has actually come out and mentioned exactly what day all these earth shattering events will occur in 2012. Might be a good excuse though if (like I believe) nothing actually happens! "Oh, we forgot to implement the leap year equation"!!!! The 503 day variable, plus or minus, more or less. Of course if it happens 503 days before, it probably won't matter as no one will be around to say I told you so!



posted on Mar, 27 2008 @ 11:41 AM
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Leap years only apply in the Gregorian calender where the actual year is longer than that portrayed on the calender, about 1/4 of a day in fact. so every 4 years, we add another day on our calender to make up the difference.

The Mayan calender, presumably, is accurate in measuring the correct length of a year, so it has no need for leap years....



posted on Mar, 27 2008 @ 12:14 PM
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No the Mayan calander did not have a leap year Their calander was designed with 13 months and 28 days a month,that comes out to be 364 days. they went from full moon to full moon as one month.

By using the calander we have now is what is throwing off the cycle because we do have a leap year.It was started in 1912.So anding all the leap years in we are 24 days off schedule with our internal clock.

Time on a clock doesn't really matter.The Higher-ups started using it so they could control their slaves.They knew as long as they kept it they would be in control,and here we are still slaves for the higher-ups today.

We need to figure out a way to free ourselves from the bondage so we as a race can move on with peace in our hearts and on the planet.Until we do then this reality we see will be our races downfall.



posted on Mar, 27 2008 @ 12:34 PM
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Originally posted by GeneralLee
No worries. A year is a year and in a "Leap Year" it's no different. I may be wrong but no one has actually come out and mentioned exactly what day all these earth shattering events will occur in 2012. Might be a good excuse though if (like I believe) nothing actually happens! "Oh, we forgot to implement the leap year equation"!!!! The 503 day variable, plus or minus, more or less. Of course if it happens 503 days before, it probably won't matter as no one will be around to say I told you so!


The date archeology is going with is december 21 2012.



posted on Mar, 27 2008 @ 12:35 PM
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reply to post by rtcctr
 


Absolutely.

The lunar calendar keeps track naturally, while the Gregorian one is like shoving a square peg into a round hole.



posted on Mar, 27 2008 @ 12:57 PM
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reply to post by rtcctr
 


From what I've read, that isn't true. The Maya had various calenders for measuring different lengths of time, from the 260 day Tzolkin to the Long count which worked over millenia.

It was using a different numbering form than we had in the West, so I do not think just scrubbing it down to a "lunar" calendar does it justice:



The most important of these calendars is one with a period of 260 days. This 260-day calendar was prevalent across all Mesoamerican societies, and is of great antiquity (almost certainly the oldest of the calendars). It is still used in some regions of Oaxaca, and amongst the Maya communities of the Guatemalan highlands. The Maya version is commonly known to scholars as the Tzolkin, or Tzolk'in in the revised orthography of the Academia de las Lenguas Mayas de Guatemala.[2] The Tzolk'in is combined with another 365-day calendar (known as the Haab, or Haab' ), to form a synchronized cycle lasting for 52 Haabs, called the Calendar Round. Smaller cycles of 13 days (the trecena) and 20 days (the veintena) were important components of the Tzolk'in and Haab' cycles, respectively.


Mayan Calendar



posted on Mar, 27 2008 @ 12:59 PM
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reply to post by groingrinder
 


Not true, a Lunar calendar, from one full moon to the next, is out of step with the seasons and will drift by 10-13 days a year. Saying it is in synch is a complete fabrication.



posted on Jul, 17 2008 @ 05:51 PM
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The answer is yes; please, visit this 2 sites:

www.famsi.org...

maya.leapyear.googlepages.com...



posted on Jul, 17 2008 @ 06:23 PM
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Excellent sources, Anonymous, and thank you. Yes, they did adjust for Leap Years, and yes the calendar runs out in 2012. If they'd still been carving in stone, they would be carving a new one.



posted on Jul, 17 2008 @ 06:29 PM
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If they'd still been carving in stone, they would be carving a new one.



SSSSHHHHHHH!

Not so loud

If the rest of ATS hears that half the threads about 2012 and the end of the world would dry up
SSSSHHH

Keep that on the downlow


[edit on 17-7-2008 by SLAYER69]



posted on Jul, 18 2008 @ 11:05 AM
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Not to worry we have four and half years more of this to go thru - and after the non event at least a year of people insisting something did happen it's just being hidden by the "governments" or insert your favorite Macro conspiracy secret society here { }.

I wonder what the next date is that the fringe world can get all worked up about?



[edit on 18/7/08 by Hanslune]



posted on Jul, 21 2008 @ 07:21 AM
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The mayan calendar has no end; it never stops.

2012 is the end of the GMT (european) correlation.

Not even the end of a mayan cycle.



posted on Jul, 24 2008 @ 07:36 PM
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reply to post by Byrd
 


2012 is the end of a "mayan" era, established by GMT (Goodman, Matinez, Thompson), creators of the GMT correlation between the mayan calendar and the julian-gregorian's.

The mayan calendar has no end. It never stops.

Wiseman, July 24, 2008



posted on Jul, 24 2008 @ 07:50 PM
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reply to post by ParanoidKid
 



Awwweee... Isn't that cute?! You're trying to think! How sweet. You should really try thinking alot more about the topic before posting as this is too simple to answer.




posted on Oct, 27 2008 @ 09:17 PM
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posted on Mar, 6 2012 @ 12:04 AM
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I did a debate about it ages ago here: www.abovetopsecret.com...

In short, they don't have leap days. So their major calendar has an error rate of 1 day every 4 years. This is because the Mayan's didn't calculate decimal points at the end of 365 days. While that's not a leap 'year' it's still significant level of inaccuracy.

There's some good sources in that debate regarding 2012. I'm sure when the world doesn't end this year, many will use excuses such as the lack of decimal points to justify the lack of end of universe to keep this one limping along for another tenish years until something else becomes vogue.



posted on Mar, 6 2012 @ 07:57 PM
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edit on 6-3-2012 by godfather420 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 7 2012 @ 09:54 PM
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Astronomy doesn't need to take 'leap year' into consideration because a year is a year.

Mayans calculated from shortest day to shortest day (Dec 21st-ish).

It just so happens that the shortest day of what we know contemporarily as 2012 is also the last shortest day before another astrological event marking the beginning of a new cycle.



posted on Mar, 8 2012 @ 10:11 AM
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Originally posted by stumason
Leap years only apply in the Gregorian calender where the actual year is longer than that portrayed on the calender, about 1/4 of a day in fact. so every 4 years, we add another day on our calender to make up the difference.

The Mayan calender, presumably, is accurate in measuring the correct length of a year, so it has no need for leap years....

The Mayan calendar only counts days, not years.

This is why it has no leap days added to it.

Of course, as was pointed out, it depends on which Mayan calendar you're talking about.

The long count is the result of the intermeshing of several shorter cyclical counts, each with a set number of days, and each one different.

The LC counts the cycles of the shorter calendars.

Harte
edit on 3/8/2012 by Harte because: (no reason given)





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