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Americas 14,000mph secret transit system

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posted on Mar, 24 2008 @ 06:21 PM
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Maybe the sonic booms are used to help propel the trains to higher speeds. Using a natural form of energy unto itself..??hmm??




posted on Mar, 24 2008 @ 06:24 PM
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Yea I see where your coming from,but that is unlikely-keep in mind it is in a vaccum-meaning no air,meaning no sonic boom.



posted on Mar, 24 2008 @ 06:32 PM
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reply to post by jkrog08
 


If the train can go 14,000 mph and the distance between LA and NY is only 2,778 miles, the train can do 2,778 in 21 minutes, then by multiplying the distance between LA and NY by 3, it should come out to be, roughly, 14,000 mph. Which, it isn't its only 8,334 mph.

A train that can move at 14,000 mph would be able to go from LA to NY in much shorter time.



posted on Mar, 24 2008 @ 06:40 PM
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how would they maintain a constant vacuum without having the tunnel crack in certain areas due to the earth shifting?

A tunnel within a tunnel supported on pistons and such?


I would imagine in a vacuum with magnets positioned around the cars to prevent them from contacting any surfaces essentially having the cars float inside the tube, extreme speeds would be possible.



posted on Mar, 24 2008 @ 06:49 PM
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Reading the OP's post I feed in my gut this could possibly happen. But, geology and mechanical stability could be a devestating factor here. Any sismic activity, even in milimeters or microns would turn it into a 14,000 mph hamburger grinder. All it would take would be one minor miscalculation for a horrific accident. Imagine hitting a water spot at those speeds. I feel sorry for the chimps on that ride!



posted on Mar, 24 2008 @ 06:51 PM
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Not to mention,
the math does not add up.



posted on Mar, 24 2008 @ 06:59 PM
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[edit on 3/24/2008 by jkrog08]



posted on Mar, 24 2008 @ 07:07 PM
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if anyone believes this, I have some land I want to sell you. Come on people on 14000mph why not 1000000



posted on Mar, 24 2008 @ 07:20 PM
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reply to post by The Lizard King
 


Where did you get the "multiply by 3 from?"Also keep in mind that the 8,000 some odd mph is ts avg. speed,it will never reach the 14000 mark for more than a second,if you read my earlier posts you would know that,its like a short burst than a decel.



posted on Mar, 24 2008 @ 07:26 PM
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Check out this youtube video:Here

[edit on 3/24/2008 by jkrog08]



posted on Mar, 24 2008 @ 07:34 PM
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reply to post by jkrog08
 


If this is true, then think back the past couple years, I remember some earthquake/tremors reports that popped up in national news for a couple days, and thier locations are not in what we would consider typical. This might be some serious work going on deep down there. [Inject 2012 governmental secret survival system concept]

Then one could place thier locations in reference to that map with the supposed tunnel directions. I would "imagine" it would show some "expansion work".

If this was been stated before my post posted, "oops".



posted on Mar, 24 2008 @ 07:36 PM
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Originally posted by The Lizard King
Not to mention,
the math does not add up.


Your math isn't taking into account the rate of acceleration, or deceleration. The alleged "train" wouldn't start out at 14,000 mph, nor would it come to an instantaneous stop when it reached its destination.

Also, just because a VHST may be able to reach 14,000 mph (in a vacuum) doesn't mean it necessarily would. Do cars always travel at "top speed"? Do jets always fly with full afterburners on? Just because a vehicle has a "max capability" doesn't mean that the alleged capability is always, or ever, used. My car's speedometer goes to 140 mph, but I've never tested that mark.

I'm no stranger to the tales of underground U.S. VHSTs. The main problem in the theory, that I see, is in maintaining a vacuum. From what I've read, they purportedly use a heating system (laser tech?) to "melt & polish" the tube's walls to a "glass like" finish; however, the slightest seismic activity could/would severely hamper that factor.

There's also the issue of gaps and crevices beneath the surface of the earth. In some places there's simply nothing there to "melt & polish". The only way, that I see, to overcome this would be to bore a larger space, and construct a smaller diameter "tube" within it. That would leave a gap to help buffer the tube from any minor seismic occurances.



posted on Mar, 24 2008 @ 07:42 PM
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Originally posted by The Lizard King
reply to post by jkrog08
 


If the train can go 14,000 mph and the distance between LA and NY is only 2,778 miles, the train can do 2,778 in 21 minutes, then by multiplying the distance between LA and NY by 3, it should come out to be, roughly, 14,000 mph. Which, it isn't its only 8,334 mph.

A train that can move at 14,000 mph would be able to go from LA to NY in much shorter time.


Your premise would only hold true if the train could instantly accelerate to 14000 mph. This is quite impossible since it would turn any passengers on the train into a red sticky puddle on the back wall of the train car.
However, as pointed out earlier in the thread, and I just finished redoing the math myself, if you accelerate at a fairly sedate acceleration of 1G or 9.8 Meter per second, you could reach 14000 mph (or 22530 km/hr) in approximately 10.5 minutes. By that time you'd need to start slowing down, again at 1G negative acceleration so that by the time you reached your destination, your velocity would be zero.

Someone also mentioned that 1G of acceleration would be highly uncomfortable. In general, I think it would be fine. It would feel no different than lying down on your bed with a lot of pillows behind your knees to hold your legs up. I would imagine you could also construct the chairs so that they could swivel and make the ride much more comfortable. Or, instead of seats, you could have vertical, padded walls that basically would turn into beds while under acceleration since the acceleration would push you into the wall with the same force as gravity pushes you into your bed when you lie down.

I agree with a previous poster that the 2 bigget obstacles would be keeping the system in a vacuum and seismic activity. One tremor and the tunnel could collapse, or at the least, loose it's vacuum. Without a vacuum, the shockwave of a 14000 mph vehicle moving in a tunnel (and moving that volume of air) would tear the tunnel and the vehicle to pieces.



[edit on 24-3-2008 by BomSquad]



posted on Mar, 24 2008 @ 07:46 PM
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reply to post by redmage
 


Bah, you beat me to it!


Well said



posted on Mar, 24 2008 @ 07:52 PM
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reply to post by jcavs88
 


You might wana quote Bill Clinton on that one.If you read all my post I do support this claim with evidence.



posted on Mar, 24 2008 @ 07:55 PM
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Originally posted by redmage

Originally posted by The Lizard King
Not to mention,
the math does not add up.


Your math isn't taking into account the rate of acceleration, or deceleration. The alleged "train" wouldn't start out at 14,000 mph, nor would it come to an instantaneous stop when it reached its destination.

Also, just because a VHST may be able to reach 14,000 mph (in a vacuum) doesn't mean it necessarily would. Do cars always travel at "top speed"? Do jets always fly with full afterburners on? Just because a vehicle has a "max capability" doesn't mean that the alleged capability is always, or ever, used. My car's speedometer goes to 140 mph, but I've never tested that mark.

I'm no stranger to the tales of underground U.S. VHSTs. The main problem in the theory, that I see, is in maintaining a vacuum. From what I've read, they purportedly use a heating system (laser tech?) to "melt & polish" the tube's walls to a "glass like" finish; however, the slightest seismic activity could/would severely hamper that factor.

There's also the issue of gaps and crevices beneath the surface of the earth. In some places there's simply nothing there to "melt & polish". The only way, that I see, to overcome this would be to bore a larger space, and construct a smaller diameter "tube" within it. That would leave a gap to help buffer the tube from any minor seismic occurances.

Excellent post,stared.I agree w/ you on all of your points,but I believe they have worked past this,of course there is risks w/ anything incorporating such high speeds.



posted on Mar, 24 2008 @ 07:57 PM
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reply to post by BomSquad
 


Just like I told the poster above you,excellent post,stared.Yea it would be bad if the vaccum collapsed but I am sure they took mearsures against that and siesmic activity.Also the article said that it would have special swiveling chairs to make the ride more tolerable.



posted on Mar, 24 2008 @ 08:00 PM
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I wonder if there is speed limits to what magnetic propulsion can achieve(in a vaccum)I understand it wouldnt be logical for it to go any faster for the rail way purpose-even for a cross-global trip,but if this tech. was employed in space(which many ufologist believe is et's propulsion than I would see only energy input being a hurdle.



posted on Mar, 24 2008 @ 08:07 PM
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Originally posted by jcavs88
Come on people on 14000mph why not 1000000


Quite simply... distance. Sure, with enough energy, you could accelerate to 1,000,000 mph; however, you can only accelerate at a rate that the human body can handle/survive, and by the time you reach 1,000,000 mph you would have long since passed your desired destination.


Originally posted by BomSquad
Well said


You too
, and I think your "red sticky puddle" description is quite fitting when it comes to jcavs88's concern.


[edit on 3/25/08 by redmage]



posted on Mar, 24 2008 @ 08:10 PM
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reply to post by jkrog08
 


Theoretically, there is almost no limit on the speed a maglev in a vacuum can go.
Practically...there are a few considerations.
1. Not that we'd get close to it, but there is the universal speed limit of light. Nothing with mass can accelerate to the speed of light.
2. Getting something as heavy as a train to start accelerating is no small feat. It takes a lot of energy to get something that heavy to start moving, and just as much energy to get it to stop.
3. The amount of acceleration your passengers can take is also a limiting factor. You really don't want to push people more than 1 or 2Gs at the most. More than that and you could start having health problems with people who aren't in good physical condition. Also, as pointed out before, accelerations of more than 1G start to get rather uncomfortable after a bit. And, accelerating at 1G gets you moving pretty quickly in a short amount of time, therefore you'd have to take into the consideration that you'll need to slow down. The faster you're going, the longer it will take you to slow down, and again, you don't want to use more than 1 or 2Gs of negative acceleration for the same reasons as mentioned before.

I hope I'm making sense...




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