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Will there be a run on grocery stores?

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posted on Mar, 22 2008 @ 01:48 PM
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reply to post by forestlady
 


If the Indy's strike, they'll never work independent again. And I hate to say it, but I think that is exactly what "they" want. The same way all the Mom & Pop businesses across the country have closed up, so too now the truckers. Everything will be corporate, the better to control you with.




posted on Mar, 22 2008 @ 01:50 PM
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reply to post by Zaphod58
 


You seem to know your stuff about trucking. I was seriously considering a much needed career change this Spring, and thought that driving a rig would be just the thing. Am I mistaken?



posted on Mar, 22 2008 @ 03:06 PM
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Originally posted by jackinthebox
reply to post by forestlady
 


If the Indy's strike, they'll never work independent again. And I hate to say it, but I think that is exactly what "they" want. The same way all the Mom & Pop businesses across the country have closed up, so too now the truckers. Everything will be corporate, the better to control you with.



It almost seems planned
F



posted on Mar, 22 2008 @ 05:41 PM
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Jumping right in with both feet (so to speak)....... Truckers have always worked hard to make a decent living. They're those more or less invisible folks that we all depend on but might tend to forget about. I've wondered how indies have been able to make it this long, with the increased costs of fuel, up keep and the like, to keep their rigs rolling.

If (and I hope there isn't a strike) there was a fairly organized truckers strike for even a week; yes, the shelves would be bare and depending on the area, I think that it could be..... unpleasant.

The overall lack of health in the economy is hitting every level. A fair sized segment of our society (American; I can't speak to other nations) is stressed and stretched to the max and maybe little more. People who are stressed tend to not always behave in a rational manner; making a dicey situation worse.

Looking around my area I think most of my neighbors are more aware of what the bingo jackpot is than they are about the overall picture of our economy. Few I think buy for more than a couple days at a time; not so much because of extreme lack of funds as they're rather eldery and don't seem inclined to have extra 'stuff' sitting around. Evidenced by how they tend to wait to till just hours before a hurricane hits and then decide to head to the market for a case of bottled water and maybe some batteries (only to complain that they aren't any and why didn't the stores plan better)

I think urban areas would fare worse (Think NYC where many apartment dwellers don't have much room to store a lot of 'supplies' and or depend on the local deli or small grocer for day to day needs), rural areas better and the sprawling 'burbs would be a toss up; depending on whether a strike kept them from being able to keep their vehicles fueled up to get to and from work.



posted on Mar, 22 2008 @ 05:49 PM
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reply to post by jackinthebox
 


I was a driver for awhile, now I work in a terminal teaching Orientation classes, and doing Safety. Truck driving can be a very rewarding career, and it's an awesome job. Research for yourself into each company before making a choice, and don't listen to the horror stories coming out of the companies. You're going to hear them from every company. As I like to tell my classes, you're going to get out of this job what you put into it. If you work hard, stay out when you can, work with your dispatcher and help him when he needs it, you'll find it's a good career. You're not going to start out making a ton of money, because you have to show that you're going to work hard, and go through training etc, but in time you can do pretty decent. I was working on an account where I brought home about 8-900 a week before taxes.



posted on Mar, 22 2008 @ 05:54 PM
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reply to post by Zaphod58
 


Thanks for the input. I'm looking at doing 2-5 years to save up some money, then try to step back to some sort of local route wherever I settle. Like driving a soda truck or a bus or something, maybe.



posted on Mar, 22 2008 @ 06:09 PM
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This store has 75 lbs of dried beans and 60 lbs of dried grain in glass jars; a garden full of fresh vegatables, 600 seeds sprouting, and fruit and nut trees a growing...

only customers:

the wife and I

It doesn't have to be "your" land; plant a seed!

buffered,

Sri Oracle



posted on Mar, 22 2008 @ 06:10 PM
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You may get out there and find that OTR is what you love. When I was doing my 48 state runs, I was amazed that they were paying me for it. I saw some amazing things out there, and had a blast. Just make sure that you look at every aspect of each company and don't just jump in with one because you like one aspect of them. You want to find the company that fits you best.



posted on Mar, 22 2008 @ 06:14 PM
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reply to post by Zaphod58
 


I really do think I'll love it. I'm just trying to reconcile that with my plans to have a family. I know most drivers do have a family, but I think that's the real tough part in the equation.



posted on Mar, 22 2008 @ 06:46 PM
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We have cats and a bird and will be stocking up on dried cat food and bird seed. We can not forget our animals they are part of the family. Many of us drink bottled water, sodas, beverages and beer of which the cost to ship is expensive like most things. It might not be a bad idea to purchase a water purifier at this time. Now is the time to stock up just in case a strike happens and I hope for the sake of our nation it does not happen. Rik Riley



posted on Mar, 22 2008 @ 07:28 PM
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If a strike is said to be on April 1st that gives us a week to stock up on the essentials. Baby formula and diapers will be in high demand as well as baby food. Rik Riley



posted on Mar, 22 2008 @ 07:59 PM
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If some are afraid of a gas shortage if a truckers strike happens here is a couple of ideas that could save you on your next fill up at your nearest gas station. Fill your gas tank in the early morning when it is cooler the gas expands in the holding tanks during the day usually, and when the gasoline heats up during the day it expands therefore giving you less gas for the buck when you fill up.

When filling your gas tank fill it slowly less fumes escape from evaporation from the gasoline, less chance of spillage and the gas will not recirculate back into the holding tank as to when you are pumping to fast. These all contribute to loss of gasoline that I did not think about. Remember to check the air in the tires this will help you save on gas, of course if you keep them filled to recommended air pressure levels.

Only a suggestion be careful when a gasoline tanker truck is filling the holding tanks at any gas station when you are pumping your gas at the same time. The pressure and weight of the new gasoline stirs up the sediment on the bottom of the holding tank therefore bringing up the possibilities of unwanted particles in your gasoline even if filters from the pump and your vehicle are in place. Rik Riley






[edit on 22-3-2008 by rikriley]



posted on Mar, 22 2008 @ 08:59 PM
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I used to drive OTR until my wife got so sick of it I had to go back to school. That was back in 1996 and I was doing pretty well. I liked it a lot but it is hard if you have a wife and kids. If you just have a wife you are a bit more flexible... If you are single and looking for a career change I highly recommend the OTR life. Just be safe and ready to work hard for the first year. After that you can pick who you work for.

I will pull into a truck stop once in a while… There is no smell like a diesel truck idling, getting fueled up and ready to roll. I see drivers doing their pre-trips or eating and doing their log books and I envy them. I do miss it & I keep my CDL current just in case... I will never give that up.

As far as the food running out I am prepared for about 60 days... After that all bets are off...
I suspect that before my 60 days are up the FEMA camps will be in full swing and the new order of things will have started to progress... I may get lucky and be able to meld back into society...

I am still stocking up though... In fact I just went out today and bought 12 cans of propane for my camping grill so I can heat up my bland canned food... That makes about 18 bottles... I do still need more ammo so that is a mission for next payday.



posted on Mar, 22 2008 @ 11:59 PM
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a strike will kill OTR trucking....Railroads will pick up much of the slack, and then keep it when the strike ends. At first there might be a lack of some food items....Stock up on canned food and freezer meat. I am stocking up on Copenhagen, steaks, and stew.



posted on Mar, 23 2008 @ 07:59 AM
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reply to post by Zaphod58
 


I don't understand it...it's alright for trucking companies to have contracts for gasoline but it's not ok to have contracts with drivers??? hmmm...



posted on Mar, 23 2008 @ 08:14 AM
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reply to post by skyshow
 


Uh WHAT? I have no idea what you're talking about there.



posted on Mar, 23 2008 @ 08:35 AM
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When I was a child our family used Carnations brand or an off brand instant powdered milk and all you do is add water. Yes the taste of the instant powdered milk does not taste as good as whole milk but it is the difference of having milk or not especially if supplies can not make it to your local grocery store. I do understand soy milk is available without refrigeration but still has to be shipped like milk and in most cases just as expensive.

Canned foods as suggested earlier in the thread are easy to prepare. When working in the field looking for oil and natural gas with seismograph crews I used to heat my soup and beans on the engine manifold of my truck. Many canned foods come with pop top easy to open lids on the container and very convenient if you do not have a can opener.




[edit on 23-3-2008 by rikriley]



posted on Mar, 23 2008 @ 09:43 AM
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ok where did you guys read that there was going to be a strike from truck drivers?
I'm originaly from france where strikes are a seasonal thing, usualy spring time and i can assure you that in 20years we never had to rush the stores. Now i live in Texas, which is about the size of France (slightly bigger actualy) and even in the case of a strike, which most likely won't happen, there is still plenty of local farm to go get your food from. A strike from the indies won't affect much, i worked shipping and receiving for whole foods, and the amount of indies vs majors was rather small. wholefoods had enough in stock for a 5day period for durable goods. Now i work in a hotel and even there shipping is done mostly by majors.
In the event of a strike, i can bet you that someone like UPS, FEDEx or even USPS could get contracted to do the deliveries. There is always a loop around things and major corporation WILL find a way to make it work.



posted on Mar, 23 2008 @ 09:46 AM
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If a truck drivers strike comes to pass it could get ugly. The National Guard would try to escort others with trucks to get thru picket lines and also use their own tucks to haul in food and bottled water.

If the strike goes on for one week that is bad enough if it goes on 2 weeks or more it will totally cripple our already ailing economy. Again we hope this will not occur but be sure to stock up on dried cereals that can be eaten with water and especially oatmeal that is very cheap.

Remember if you do not prepare and a strike does happen prices will go through the roof for food stuffs and everything else. Shortages of most all goods will drive the demand and price out of sight if a strike of any length occurs. Rik Riley



posted on Mar, 23 2008 @ 10:11 AM
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reply to post by jcjace
 


You are correct on your assumption others will pick up the load if independent truck drivers go on strike but this will not happen overnight it will take some time to reroute many goods. Prices and shortages of those goods will escalate if a strike happens for any length of time no matter what.

France you say is the size of Texas, but we in Florida receive many goods from California 3,000 miles away including, Michigan, Texas and etc. In Florida we would fare better then most because of the abundance of produce from farmers markets across the state and year around growing season but many states would not fare as well. Yes I do realize you receive in France many goods from the Euro countries and just not from France.

Yes things will be disrupted if a trucker strike happens, and in America we are very resilient and will survive. All I am saying if a major or minor disruption of goods happens stock up on extra goods now not later. Rik Riley



[edit on 23-3-2008 by rikriley]



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